PRELIMINARY PROGRAM

,
SHORT COURSES: february / seven – eight
CONFERENCE: february / nine – eleven
EXHIBITION: february / eight – ten
Register by October 31 for deepest discounts
PRELIMINARY PROGRAM
SLAS2015.ORG
Premier Sponsor:
1
TABLE
OF
CONTENTS
2
3
What’s New
4
Short Courses
8
Keynotes
9
Alliances
10
Government Focus
11
Special Sessions
12
2015 SLAS
Leadership Forum
17
Schedule
25
SLAS SIGs
28
Awards
29
Networking
31
Journal Activities
33
Career Connections
34
Exhibition
36
Registration and
Hotel Accommodations
38
Board and Committees
40
Sponsors
42
Registration Form
WHAT’S NEW
AT SLAS2015
SLAS strives to continually improve the quality of all
the Society’s programs. SLAS2015 is no exception.
Check out these new and improved aspects on tap
for SLAS2015:
WASHINGTON, DC, LOCATION:
NEW SIG - AUTOMATED SAMPLE PREPARATION OF
PHARMACEUTICAL DOSAGE FORMS:
SLAS2015 marks the first time SLAS convenes in
Washington, DC. In addition to the conveniently accessible
location and cultural attractions, DC enables a truly
unique roster of high-profile presenters and participants,
including NIH Director Francis Collins and NCATS
Director Chris Austin. For more details on programming
geared specifically towards scientists from government
laboratories and agencies, see page 10.
Get in on the ground floor with this new SLAS Special
Interest Group dedicated to those interested in the current
and future state of automation platforms used in sample
preparation of pharmaceutical dosage forms. See pages
25-27 for a list of SLAS2015 SIGs.
2015 SLAS LEADERSHIP FORUM:
SLAS will host its first Leadership Forum at SLAS2015.
This unique program, tailored to the needs and interests
of executive-level professionals, features a distinguished
collection of participants and attendees discussing
strategic-caliber issues in life science R&D. A highlight
of this forum is a panel discussion on “Rescuing US
Biomedical Research From Its Systemic Flaws.” See
page 12 for details on this inaugural, invite-only
program offering.
SPECIAL SESSIONS:
Program planners have curated several special
sessions, each comprised of multiple presentations.
These include European Government/Foundation Drug
Discovery Initiatives, An Evening With NIH, and The
Commercialization of Laboratory Technologies: From
Ideas to Reality (presented by the Journal of Laboratory
Automation). See page 11 for additional details on
these sessions.
CELEBRATE 20 YEARS OF JOURNAL PUBLISHING:
REVAMPED SHORT COURSES:
2015 marks 20 years of publishing for SLAS’s
two peer-reviewed, MEDLINE-indexed
scientific journals, JALA and JBS. Join in the
festivities with a number of author meetand-greets, instruction on how to improve
the quality and discoverability of your own
research, and other special programming. See details on
page 31.
SLAS2015 features a completely updated lineup of
Short Courses, including seven brand new offerings.
See pages 4 - 7 for a listing and descriptions of SLAS2015
Short Courses.
CAREER CONNECTIONS AND STUDENT PROGRAMMING:
A host of career services and educational workshops are
offered to help you set or redirect your career trajectory.
See details on page 33.
SLAS2015 Conference App
Use your smartphone or tablet to stay on top of the latest SLAS2015
news, plan your itinerary, review session abstracts, take notes, visit
the e-poster gallery, view a virtual exhibition floor map and exhibitor
listing, and more with the SLAS2015 conference app for iOS and
Android devices, available as a free download in early 2015. Watch
SLAS2015.org for information.
3
Sponsored by
SHORT COURSES
17 Short Courses will kick-off SLAS2015 on Saturday-Sunday, February 7-8. This completely revamped lineup is sure to
help your research proficiency, increase your understanding of prevalent automation techniques, and improve your value
to your organization. SLAS2015 Short Course attendance is limited and requires an additional registration fee. For costs
and other details, visit SLAS2015.org.
saturday, february seventh
Liquid Handling Essentials – A Hands-On Workshop
Bridging Fundamental Concepts to Practice [NEW]
8:30 am - 4:30 pm
This course is designed with the new and experienced
liquid handling user in mind. With a balanced mix of
lecture and hands-on activities, the course focuses on
understanding and applying key liquid handling concepts
while measuring the outcome on live systems. Best
practices and guidance for assessing and maintaining
quality pipetting performance are emphasized.
Establishing Cell-Based Assays for Screening
This course describes developing standard procedures
for handling cultured cells to set up cell-based assays,
techniques for measuring cell health and the pathways
leading to cytotoxicity, developing siRNA screening assays,
and an overview of various GPCR screening methods.
Instructors:
Nathaniel Hentz
North Carolina State University
Instructors:
Eric Johnson
Wuxi AppTee
Keith Albert
ARTEL
Terry Riss
Promega
Dana Campbell
ARTEL
Lisa Minor
In Vitro Strategies, LLC
Geoffrey Bartholomeusz
UT M.D. Anderson Cancer Center
Lab-on-a-Chip: From Technology to
Bioanalysis on Chip [NEW]
This course is aimed at researchers who are interested in
learning more about new developments in the technology
behind lab-on-a-chip systems. This course is a “how-to”
primer that could form the basis for the development
of prototypes having integrated functions for a variety
of purposes.
Instructors:
Sabeth Verpoorte
University of Groningen
Johan Nilsson
Lund University
SLAS2015 Short Courses
offer a deep dive into key
scientific topics.
Jörg P. Kutter
University of Copenhagen
4
Digital Image Processing and Analysis for the
Laboratory Scientist: Theory and Application [NEW]
sunday, february eighth
8:30 am - 4:30 pm
Laptop Required
This course takes a practical, hands-on approach to
the application of digital image processing and analysis
in a life-sciences laboratory. Diverse techniques and
applications are covered. This course prepares the
attendees to apply learned methodologies to their own
experimental images and to summarize results.
3D Cell-Based Assays for Drug De-Risking
The continually rising numbers of compound failures and
increasing costs of drug and substance development are
fostering the use of biologically more complex cell models.
Physiological relevance is a key parameter to improve the
predictive power of cell-based assays. The course covers
advanced 3D cell culture technologies and their use in
substance testing.
Instructors:
Matthew Fronheiser
Mark F. Russo
Rowan University
Instructors:
Ursula Graf-Hausner
University of Applied Sciences Zurich
High Content Screening: Instrumentation, Assay
Development, Screening, Image and Data Analysis
Jens M. Kelm
InSphero AG
High-content screening is a powerful technology platform
for implementing functional cell-based assays that allow
truly multi-parametric analysis in the physiological context
of intact cells. This course provides a state-of-the-art
overview of the components of HCS (instrumentation,
reagents, HC assay development, automated image
analysis and multi-parametric data analysis, and data
standards) together with some showcases of small
molecule and RNAi high-content screens in industry
and academia.
Cross Functional Project Management for
Technical Professionals [NEW]
The course reviews the art and science involved in running
successful cross-functional project teams. Course work
stresses the planning activities required for success as
well as the keys for project execution. This course exposes
attendees to the key activities required in planning and
managing successful cross-functional projects.
Instructor:
Barry Weinstein
Barry M. Weinstein and Associates
Instructors:
Eberhard Krausz
ChemBioCon
Marc Bickle
Max Planck Institute of Molecular Cell Biology and Genetics,
Technology Development Studio
Data Management in the Age of Big Data, Mobile, and
the Cloud [NEW]
This course provides decision makers and practitioners
from bio-pharma, health care, and academia with a
comprehensive overview of IT trends in laboratory
automation, data management and systems integration.
It highlights the current hot fields in the area of data
management, big data, cloud computing and mobile
technologies. This course provides crucial guidance
for assessing how these new technologies fit into your
laboratory data landscape.
Instructor:
Burkhard Schaefer
BSSN Software
5
Lab-on-a-Chip: Biomedical Case Studies [NEW]
sunday, february eighth (cont’d)
This course focuses on the fundamentals of statistics and
simple statistical methods that are routinely applied in the
bioanalytical laboratory. Topics include review of statistical
terms and concepts; study design; assessing bioanalytical
measurement quality; fitting equations to bioanalytical
data, HTS data normalization and statistical testing.
This course is aimed at researchers who already have a
good basis in lab-chip technologies and are interested
in exploring biomedical applications, in particular how
lab-chip systems have been or could be developed for
researchers in cutting-edge drug development and
the life sciences. Lectures are presented using a casestudy approach, using a number of selected examples to
emphasize which aspects and issues play a deciding role in
how a particular system is developed.
Instructors:
Liming Shi
Eli Lilly and Company
Instructors:
Sabeth Verpoorte
University of Groningen
Robert Nadon
McGill University and Genome Quebec Innovation Centre
Johan Nilsson
Lund University
Introduction to Laboratory Automation
Jörg P. Kutter
University of Copenhagen
Introduction of Quantitative Treatment of Biological
Assays in the Bioanalytical Laboratory [NEW]
This course presents a broad introduction to laboratory
automation in the R&D laboratory environment (i.e.
non-clinical). A general understanding of a laboratory
environment is helpful.
Label-Free/Biophysics Methods for Screening
Gain an overview on the most relevant biochemical
biophysics/ label-free technologies for screening and lead
finding. Learn how this novel technologies toolbox helps
drug discovery projects. Focus is on biophysics assay
applications that allow the detection, quantification and
qualification of ligand/protein binding events with suitability
for screening and hit follow-up. Learn the strategies of the
technologies, key applications in drug discovery projects
and usage regarding impact and limitations.
Instructors:
Steven D. Hamilton
SLAS Director of Education
James M. Gill II
Introduction to the Derivation and Maintenance of
Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells
Instructors:
Christine Genick
Novartis
This course provides an overview of the basic biology and
laboratory techniques required to derive and maintain
human induced pluripotent stem cell (iPS) lines from skin
fibroblasts. Additional topics include characterization
assays for iPS and embryonic stem cells (ES) with
emphasis on the use of fluorescence activated cell sorting
(FACS) and flow cytometry (FCM) and protocols for the
derivation of neural lineage cell lines.
Instructors:
David J. Kahler
NYU Langone Medical Center
Justin Ichida
University of Southern California
Delphine Collin
Boehringer Ingelheim
Learn More in ELN
View Here
Kelvin Lam
Simplex Pharma Advisors
6
Next Generation Sequencing Technology
Fundamentals and Applications
Two-Day Short Courses
Next generation sequencing (NGS) technologies allow
laboratories to do genome-wide research that was
previously only possible at large genome centers. This
course teaches key concepts and applications of major
sequencing technologies (Illumina, 454, SOLiD, Ion Torrent
& PacBio) including their technology basics, sample preps,
data analysis and associated IT supports.
saturday, february seventh &
sunday, february eighth
Instructors:
Dawei Lin
National Institutes of Health (NIH)
Excel is widely used in scientific laboratories to
automate tedious data manipulation and presentation
tasks. This course reviews many of the tools built in to
Excel for handling problems commonly encountered in
the laboratory. It also introduces the Visual Basic for
Applications scripting language as a way to customize
Excel and expand upon its functionality.
8:30 am - 4:30 pm
Getting Started With Excel & VBA
Laptop Required
Ryan Kim
University of California, Davis Genome Center
Sample Management: Best Practice, Trends
and Challenges
Instructors:
William Neil
Martin Echols
PRESENTED IN PARTNERSHIP WITH THE INTERNATIONAL SOCIETY FOR
BIOLOGICAL AND ENVIRONMENTAL REPOSITORIES (ISBER)
Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics in
Drug Discovery
This course is designed to equip biologists and chemists
with an understanding of the principles of pharmacology
as applied to the drug discovery process. Specifically, the
two days are centered on Pharmacokinetics (day one) and
Pharmacodynamics (day two). This can be considered as
being loosely based on the dose-response relationship
as knowledge of both of these variables is needed in the
assessment of therapeutic value.
This course provides current status and considered
best practice in the discipline of sample management.
It focuses on the traditional aspects of compound
management (including how to maintain and measure
quality of compounds) but covers the synergies and
differences in managing biologics. Consideration is given to
key challenges and future directions. With the growth and
interest in biological sample management the course has
been expanded to cover this discipline.
Instructors:
Sue Holland Crimmin
GlaxoSmithKline
Learn More in ELN
Katheryn Shea
Precision for Medicine
View Here
Instructor:
Terry Kenakin
University of North Carolina School of Medicine
7
KEYNOTE
PRESENTATIONS
Donald E. Ingber, M.D., Ph.D.
Founding Director, Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard University
monday, february ninth, 9 - 10 am
Donald Ingber is a pioneer of the emerging field of biologically inspired engineering. At the Wyss
Institute, he oversees a multifaceted effort to identify the mechanisms that living organisms use to
self-assemble from molecules and cells, and to apply these design principles to develop advanced
materials and devices for healthcare and to improve sustainability. Ingber has made major
contributions to mechanobiology, tissue engineering, tumor angiogenesis, systems biology, and
nanobiotechnology. He has also authored more than 375 publications and 85 patents.
Francis Collins, M.D., Ph.D.
Director, National Institutes of Health (NIH)
wednesday, february eleventh, 8:30 - 9:30 am
As Director of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), Francis S. Collins oversees the work of
the largest supporter of biomedical research in the world, spanning the spectrum from basic to
clinical research. He is a physician-geneticist noted for his landmark discoveries of disease genes
and his leadership of the international Human Genome Project, which culminated in April 2003
with the completion of a finished sequence of the human DNA instruction book. He is also an
elected member of the Institute of Medicine and the National Academy of Sciences, was awarded
the Presidential Medal of Freedom in November 2007, and received the National Medal of Science
in 2009.
Laurie Garrett
Author, journalist and authority on global health issues
wednesday, february eleventh, 3:45 - 4:45 pm
Laurie Garrett is one of America’s leading commentators on global health issues. She is the
only person to win the three P’s of journalism: the Pulitzer Prize, the Peabody Award, and the
Polk Award. She is a Senior Fellow for Global Health at the Council on Foreign Relations, and
is the bestselling author of The Coming Plague and Betrayal of Trust. Garrett also served as a
script consultant to Contagion, the film directed by Steven Soderbergh and starring Matt Damon.
Garrett’s long-awaited third book, now in stores, is called I HEARD THE SIRENS SCREAM: How
Americans Responded to the 9/11 and Anthrax Attacks.
8
ALLIED ORGANIZATIONS AT SLAS2015:
TRANSFORM YOUR ACCESS
SLAS2015 features sessions, news, networking, innovation and unique access made possible by partnerships with other
organizations whose missions are complementary to SLAS’s charter of serving the scientific community:
American Chemical
Society (ACS)
monday and tuesday
february ninth and tenth
Washington-area members of the
American Chemical Society (ACS) will
provide one-on-one mentoring and
career advice to SLAS2015 attendees.
Laboratory Products
Association (LPA)
monday, february ninth, 7 - 8 am
LPA and SLAS host a special session
to announce the preliminary results of
the annual North American Survey of
Laboratory Purchasing Trends.
Association for
Molecular Pathology
(AMP)
AMP representatives deliver
presentations on special diagnostics
and biomarkers. Presenters include:
Reid Robison, Tute Genomics, and
Roger Lebo, Akron Children’s Hospital.
LRIG
monday, february ninth, 6:30 - 8:30 pm
Late Night With LRIG – Rapid Fire
Innovation Session: Sponsored by LRIG,
ELRIG and local LRIG chapters; an
interactive forum featuring an
overview, discussion and open
question-and-answer session about
new technologies.
International Society
for Biological and
Environmental
Repositories (ISBER)
sunday, february eighth
ISBER partners with SLAS to deliver
the short course Sample Management:
Best Practice, Trends and Challenges.
Instructors include Sue Holland
Crimmin, GlaxoSmithKline, and
Katheryn Shea, Precision for Medicine.
Society of
Biomolecular Imaging
and Informatics (SBI2)
tuesday, february tenth, 8 - 9:15 am
The HCS/HCA Data and Informatics
SIG is presented in partnership with
the Society of Biomolecular Imaging
and Informatics (SBI2). The SIG
actively addresses issues in the area
of information technology and fosters
discussions, information sharing and
meetings among group members and
SIG participants at SLAS2015.
For details on these sessions and other strategic alliances at SLAS2015, visit SLAS2015.org.
9
Podium Presentations
YOUR PUBLIC SERVICE
Researchers from prominent government labs and
agencies deliver several presentations as part of the
scientific podium program. A partial listing of these
presentations includes:
Government Focus At SLAS2015
Assay Development & Screening Track
Presentation: Pattern Recognition for Imaging Assays in High
Content Screens
In connection with the DC meeting location, SLAS
has assembled a series of presenters and conference
activities geared especially towards scientists from
government laboratories and agencies. This special
lineup of programming includes:
Presenter: Ilya Goldberg, Laboratory of Genetics, NIH/NIA-IRP
Drug Target Strategies Track
Presentation: Strategies for the Discovery and Evaluation
of Non-Inhibitory Small Molecule Chaperones of
Glucocerebrosidase with Therapeutic Potential for the
Treatment of Gaucher and Parkinson’s Disorders
SPECIAL SESSION: European Government/
Presenter: Juan Marugan, NIH/National Center for Advancing
Translational Sciences (NCATS)
Foundation Drug Discovery Initiatives
monday, february ninth, 10:30 am - 12:30 pm
Informatics Track
(See description on page 11.)
Presentation: The Challenges of Managing Big Data and New
Platforms for Quantitating Biology
SPECIAL SESSION: An Evening With NIH
Presenter: Susan Gregurick, National Institute of General
Medical Sciences, National Institutes of Health (NIH)
moderated by
Chris Austin, Director, NCATS
monday, february ninth, 6:30 - 8:30 pm
Micro/Nano Technologies Track
(See description on page 11.)
Presentation: SpinDx: A Deployable Syndromic-Based
Diagnostic System for Detection of Proteins, Nucleic Acids,
and Cells
Keynote Presentation
Presenter: Chung-Yan Koh, Sandia National Laboratories
by Francis Collins, Director, National Institutes
of Health (NIH)
Check out the SLAS2015 Event Scheduler, available early
November 2014, for complete information on these and
other presentations.
wednesday, february eleventh, 8:30 - 9:30 am
10
The Commercialization of Laboratory Technologies:
From Ideas to Reality (presented by the Journal of
Laboratory Automation)
SPECIAL SESSIONS
AT SLAS2015
Session Chairs:
Dean Ho, University of California,
Los Angeles and Edward Chow,
National University of Singapore
monday, february ninth, 3 - 5 pm
SLAS2015 is pleased to host a series of special sessions,
each comprised of multiple presentations,
dedicated to timely and relevant topical areas.
Topics covered in this session include the process of
commercialization and challenges that, when overcome,
catalyze the ability to transition a product or technology
from benchtop innovation to lasting commercial impact.
European Government/Foundation Drug
Discovery Initiatives
• Creativity Beyond the Science: Innovative Ways to
Commercialize an Idea in the Global Industry
Presenter: Katherine Wang, BRIM Technology
Session Chair:
Steven Rees, AstraZeneca
monday, february ninth,
10:30 am - 12:30 pm
• Moving Research Innovations to the Market
Presenter: Alicia Löffler, Innovation and New Ventures
Office, Northwestern University
European governmental and charity agencies are
enabling translation of academic discovery into health
benefits of economic value by funding the creation of
several novel models and approaches to drug discovery.
These initiatives have included the development of new
compound libraries, the establishment of academic
screening centers and the formation of innovative
partnerships with industry. Speakers in this special
session explore the interaction of these initiatives with
academia and pharma, and describe the anticipated
benefit of these programs in terms of bringing novel
projects into the clinic.
• Opportunities and Challenges in Life Sciences R&D
Presenter: Jeremy Caldwell, Third Rock Ventures
• Minding the Gaps in Biomedical Technology Translation
Presenter: Megan Frisk, Science Translational
Medicine/AAAS
An Evening With NIH
monday, february ninth, 6:30 - 8:30 pm
Join Chris Austin, Director, National Center
for Advancing Translational Sciences (NCATS)
as he chairs a special evening event focused
on the array of programs, services and
capabilities of the National Institutes of
Health and how to best navigate the organization.
• Chemical Biology Consortium Sweden – Deliveries
Including Scientific Highlights After Five Years
Presenter: Annika Jenmalm Jensen, Chemical
Biology Consortium
• Facilitated Translation Within NCATS’ TRND and
BrIDGs Programs
Presenter: John McKew, National Institutes of
Health (NIH)
• EU-OPENSCREEN: Chemical Tools for the Life Sciences
Presenter: Philip Gribbon, ScreeningPort Hamburg
• The European Lead Factory: Game Changing for
Innovative Medicine
Presenter: Steven van Helden, Pivot Park
Screening Centre
• NIH-Industry Partnership to Discover New Therapeutic
Uses for Existing Molecules
Presenter: Christine Colvis, National Institutes of Health
(NIH) Learn more in ELN
• Opening “The Box of Delights” – Accessing Pharma to
Enhance Academic Drug Discovery
Presenter: Justin Bryans, MRC Technology
• National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences
(NCATS) SBIR and STTR Programs: Valuable Resources
for Small Businesses
Presenter: Lili Portilla, National Institutes of Health (NIH)
• NCI Experimental Therapeutics Program
Presenter: Barbara Mroczkowski, National Institutes of
Health (NIH)
11
SLAS INAUGURAL LEADERSHIP FORUM
On Sunday and Monday, February 8-9, SLAS is hosting
the Society’s first Leadership Forum dedicated to key,
strategic-caliber issues related to life science R&D. This
is an invitation-only event for executive- and other c-level
professionals in the SLAS community. Among the
invitees will be past and current leaders of SLAS and
its legacy organizations, the Society for Biomolecular
Sciences (SBS) and the Association for Laboratory
Automation (ALA).
This inaugural program features a panel discussion
focusing on the recent publication in the Proceedings
of the National Academy of Sciences – “Rescuing US
Biomedical Research From Its Systemic Flaws”:
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
[2014 111 (26) E2632-E2633]
Bruce Alberts, Marc W. Kirschner, Shirley Tilghman, and Harold Varmus, University of
California, San Francisco; Harvard Medical School; Princeton University; and National
Cancer Institute
The long-held but erroneous assumption of never-ending rapid growth in biomedical
science has created an unsustainable hypercompetitive system that is discouraging
even the most outstanding prospective students from entering our profession – and
making it difficult for seasoned investigators to produce their best work. This is a recipe
for long-term decline, and the problems cannot be solved with simplistic approaches.
Instead, it is time to confront the dangers at hand and rethink some fundamental
features of the US biomedical research ecosystem. Read the paper, here.
2015 SLAS Leadership Forum
At-A-Glance
sunday, february eighth
• Leadership Forum Welcome Reception
Scheduled panelists include:
• Panel Discussion “Rescuing US Biomedical Research
From Its Systemic Flaws”
Donald E. Ingber
Founding Director, Wyss Institute for Biologically
Inspired Engineering at Harvard University
• SLAS2015 Welcome Reception in Exhibition
• SLAS President’s Reception
Alicia Löffler
Associate Vice President, Innovation and New
Ventures, Northwestern University
monday, february ninth
• Leadership Forum Breakfast
• SLAS2015 Welcome and Opening Keynote Address
(8:30 – 10 am)
Rob Nail
Co-founder of Velocity 11 and associate founder of
Singularity University
Donald E. Ingber
Founding Director, Wyss Institute for Biologically
Inspired Engineering at Harvard University
James D. Sterling
Interim Dean of the College of Natural Sciences;
Director of Minerva Labs, Minerva Schools at KGI
• Access to the SLAS2015 Exhibition Hall
Admission to the 2015 SLAS Leadership Forum is by invitation only and requires a separate registration fee of $299.
For more information, or to request an invitation to attend, please contact Suanne Determan of the SLAS Professional
Team at sdeterman@slas.org.
12
CONFERENCE-AT-A-GLANCE
(Schedule Subject to Change)
Saturday, February 7, 2015
7:30 am - 5 pm
8:30 am - 4:30 pm
Registration Open
Short Courses: Establishing Cell-Based Assays for Screening; Lab-on-a-Chip: From Technology to Bioanalysis on Chip [NEW]; Liquid
Handling Essentials - A Hands-On Workshop Bridging Fundamental Concepts to Practice [NEW]
Two-Day Courses: Getting Started With Excel & VBA Laptop Required ; Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics in Drug Discovery
Sunday, February 8, 2015
7:30 am - 7 pm
8:30 am - 4:30 pm
Registration Open
Short Courses: 3D Cell-Based Assays for Drug De-Risking; Cross Funtional Project Management for Technical Professionals [NEW];
Data Management in the Age of Big Data, Mobile, and the Cloud [NEW]; Digital Image Processing and Analysis for the Laboratory
Scientist: Theorgy and Application [NEW] Laptop Required ; High Content Screening: Instrumentation, Assay Development, Screening,
Image and Data Analysis; Introduction of Quantitative Treatment of Biological Assays in the Bioanalytical Laboratory [NEW];
Introduction to Laboratory Automation; Introduction to the Derivation and Maintenance of Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells;
Lab-on-a-Chip: Biomedical Case Studies [NEW]; Label-Free/Biophysics Methods for Screening; Next Generation Sequencing
Technology Fundamentals and Applications; Sample Management: Best Practice, Trends and Challenges
Two-Day Courses: Getting Started With Excel & VBA Laptop Required ; Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics in Drug Discovery
2 - 4:30 pm
2015 SLAS Leadership Forum
4:30 - 7 pm
Exhibition Open
5 - 6 pm
Member Center Special Event: Meet JALA Editor-in-Chief Ed Chow
5 - 6 pm
Member Center Special Event: Meet JBS Editor-in-Chief Bob Campbell
5:30 - 7 pm
7:30 - 9:30 pm
Welcome Reception in Exhibit Hall / Student and Early Career Professional Mixer in Member Center
SLAS Student and Early Career Professionals Event at Lucky Strike
Monday, February 9, 2015
6:30 am
Promega Sunrise Run
7 - 8 am
Laboratory Products Association (LPA) Special Session
7 - 8 am
Career Connections: Joanne Kamens Session - Not Networking 101: Building Professional Relationships for Success
(Breakfast served)
7:30 am - 6 pm
8 - 8:30 am
Sponsored By:
Registration Open
Morning Beverage Break
Join the SLAS Social Media Communities
#SLAS2015
Our online communities are growing every day. Stay up-to-date
and join in the discussions. Sign-up now!
13
Monday, February 9 continued
8:30 - 9 am
9 - 10 am
10 - 10:30 am
Keynote Session: Welcome and Opening Remarks
Keynote Speaker: Donald E. Ingber, Founding Director, Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard University
Beverage Break in the Exhibit Hall
10 am - 6:30 pm
Career Connections: ACS Mentoring Sessions / One-on-One Career Counseling Sessions / Job Boards
10 am - 6:30 pm
Exhibition Open
10 am - 6:30 pm
Poster Viewing in Exhibit Hall
Session 1
10:30 am - 12:30 pm
Assay
Development and
Screening
Biochemical
and Biophysical
Methods in
Screening
Automation and
High-Throughput
Technologies
Bioanalytical
Techniques
Machine-Learning
Advances in the Life
Sciencess
Recent Advances in
Membrane Protein
Characterization
Micro/Nano
Technologies
Informatics
Data Analysis
Approaches
for Cellular,
Phenotypic, and
High Content
Screening
Microphysiological
Systems
Special Session
European
Government/
Foundation Drug
Discovery Initiatives
12:30 - 1:15 pm
Exhibitor Tutorials: Agilent Technologies; ARTEL; Cisbio Bioassays; Festo; IntelliCyt; MaxCyte; TTP Labtech
12:30 - 1:30 pm
Career Connections: Joanne Kamens Session - Smooth Transitions - Top 10 List: Things Scientists Ask About Finding an Industry Job
(Bring a box Lunch.)
12:30 - 1:30 pm
Lunch in the Exhibit Hall
12:30 - 1:45 pm
Exhibitor Tutorials: Brooks Automation; DiscoveRx; Labcyte; Thermo Scientific
1 - 3 pm
Poster Presentations (Even Numbered Posters)
2 - 2:45 pm
Exhibitor Tutorials: Genedata; Promega
2:30 - 3 pm
Beverage Break in the Exhibit Hall
2:30 - 4:30 pm
Session 2
3 - 5 pm
5 pm
Clinical Chemistry Trainee Council Info Session
Assay
Development and
Screening
Emerging Trends
in High Content
Screening
Automation and
High-Throughput
Technologies
Emerging
Approaches to
High-Throughput
Screening of
Membrane Bound
Targets
Bioanalytical
Techniques
Targeted
Proteomics
Micro/Nano
Technologies
Informatics
The Challenges of
Managing Big Data
and New Platforms
for Quantitating
Biology
Diagnostics and
Point-of-Care
Microdevices
Student Poster Award Announcement
5:30 - 6:30 pm
Reception in Exhibit Hall Celebrating the 2015 SLAS Journal Achievement Award Honorees
6:30 - 8:30 pm
Late Night with LRIG - Rapid-Fire Innovation Session
6:30 - 8:30 pm
Special Session: An Evening With NIH
14
Special Session
The
Commercialization
of Laboratory
Technologies:
From Ideas to
Reality (presented
by the Journal
of Laboratory
Automation)
Tuesday, February 10, 2015
7 - 8:15 am
Career Connections: Dan Eustace Session - Mock Interviews: Preparation and Practice for Getting the Jobs You Want
(Breakfast served)
7:15 - 9 am
Analytical, Life Science and Diagnostic Association Special Session (Invitation Only)
7:30 - 8 am
Morning Beverage Break
7:30 am - 5:30 pm
8 - 9:15 am
Sponsored By:
Registration Open
Special Interest Groups: Academic Drug Discovery and Drug Repurposing (Joint Session); ADMET; Automation Quality Control; HCS/
HCA Data and Informatics; Screen Design and Assay Technology; Technology Transfer and CRO/CMO Project Management; Women
Professionals in Science and Technology
9:30 - 10:15 am
Exhibitor Tutorials: CYTOO, Genedata, Promega
9:30 am - 6 pm
Career Connections: ACS Mentoring Sessions / One-on-One Career Counseling Sessions / Job Boards
9:30 am - 6 pm
Exhibition Open
9:30 am - 6 pm
Poster Viewing in the Exhibit Hall
10 - 10:30 am
Beverage Break in the Exhibit Hall
Session 3
10:30 am - 12:30 pm
Assay
Development and
Screening
The Importance
of Medicinal
Chemistry in
Screening
Automation and
High-Throughput
Technologies
Bioanalytical
Techniques
Automating
Phenotypic vs.
Target Based
Discovery: The Past,
The Present, The
Future
Advances in
Analysis in
Biological Matrices
Biomarker
Discovery and
Applications
Biomarkers for
Personalized
Medicine
Informatics
Facing the
Challenges of
Data Quality and
Reproducibility
12:30 - 1:15 pm
Exhibitor Tutorials: Agilent Technologies, ARTEL, Cisbio Bioassays, Essen BioScience, Festo; TTP Labtech
12:30 - 1:30 pm
Career Connections: Joanne Kamens Session - How to Choose Your Next Lab (Bring a box lunch)
12:30 - 1:30 pm
Lunch Break in the Exhibit Hall
12:30 - 1:45 pm
Exhibitor Tutorial: BioTek Instruments, Brook Automation, Cellular Dynamics International, Labcyte
1 - 3 pm
New Product Award Announcement in Exhibit Hall
2:30 - 3 pm
Beverage Break in the Exhibit Hall
Session 4
3 - 5 pm
5 - 5:30 pm
Digital and Droplet
Microfluidics
Poster Presentations (Odd Numbered Posters)
2 - 2:15 pm
2:30 - 4:30 pm
Micro/Nano
Technologies
Member Center Event: ORCID Learn About This New Tool for Journal Authors
Assay Development
and Screening
Natural Products in
Screening
Automation and
High-Throughput
Technologies
Flow Based
Approaches to
High-Throughput
Chemistry,
Assaying, and
Formulation
Biomarker
Discovery and
Applications
Biomarker
Discovery
Technologies
Drug Target
Strategies
Chemical Biology
Approaches to
Understanding
Mechanism of
Action
Informatics
Micro/Nano
Technologies
Open and Public
Sources of Data
Micro and
Nanofluidics for
Bioanalytical
Systems
Passport to Prizes Winners Announced in Exhibit Hall
5 - 6 pm
Exhibition Closing Reception
7 - 10 pm
SLAS2015 Reception at Smithsonian National Air & Space Museum
15
Sponsored By:
Wednesday, February 11, 2015
8 - 8:30 am
Morning Beverage Break
8 am - 1:30 pm
Registration Open
8:30 - 9:30 am
Keynote: Francis Collins, Director National Institutes of Health (NIH)
Session 5
9:45 - 11:45 am
11:30 am - 12 pm
11:45 am - 1:15 pm
12 - 1:15 pm
Session 6
Assay Development
and Screening
Assay Platforms for
Biologics
Automation and
High-Throughput
Technologies
Non-Traditional
Automated
Technologies for
HTS
Biomarker
Discovery and
Applications
Translational
Medicine
Drug Target
Strategies
Physiologically
Relevant Target
Strategies
Micro/Nano
Technologies
Informatics
Using Mobile,
Web, and Cloud
Technologies
to Improve the
Process and
Communication of
Research
Overcoming
Nanotechnologies
Challenges
Lunch for Full Conference Participants
JALA & JBS Author Workshop: How to Get Your Work Published
Special Interest Groups: Automated Sample Preparation of Pharmaceutical Dosage Forms; Informatics; Labware Leachables;
Phenotypic Drug Discovery; Sample Management; Standards Initiatives; Stem Cells and 3D Microtissues
Assay Development
and Screening
1:30 - 3:30 pm
Cell Based Assays
and Screening
3:30 - 3:45 pm
Beverage Break
Automation and
High-Throughput
Technologies
Advances in
High-Throughput
Analytics and
Automation
Drug Target
Strategies
New Approaches for
Interrogating High
Value Targets
Informatics
Enhancing Lab
Automation Via
Software
Micro/Nano
Technologies
Commericialization Strategies
for Micro and Nanofluidic Devies
3:45 - 5 pm
Closing Remarks, Keynote Presenter: Laurie Garrett, Author, journalist and authority on global health issues
Announcement of the SLAS Innovation Award Winner
5 - 5:30 pm
Book Signing with Keynote Speaker Laurie Garrett
SLAS Point-to-Point E-News Brief
This mobile-friendly weekly e-mail news brief keeps you
up to date with SLAS news announcements, deadline
reminders and selected industry headlines. Visit
SLAS.org to sign up for a free subscription
and browse the archives.
16
CONFERENCE SCHEDULE
(Schedule Subject to Change)
Short Course Program is held on Saturday, February 7 and Sunday, February 8. For complete listing
see pages 4-7.
Sunday, February 8, 2015
7:30 am - 7 pm
Registration Open
2 - 4:30 pm
2015 SLAS Leadership Forum
4:30 - 7 pm
Exhibition Open
5 - 6 pm
Member Center Special Event: Meet JALA Editor-in-Chief Ed Chow
5 - 6 pm
Member Center Special Event: Meet JBS Editor-in-Chief Bob Campbell
5:30 - 7 pm
7:30 - 9:30 pm
Welcome Reception in Exhibit Hall / Student and Early Career Professionals Mixer in Member Center
SLAS Student and Early Career Professionals Event at Lucky Strike
Monday, February 9, 2015
6:30 am
Promega Sunrise Run
7 - 8 am
Laboratory Products Association (LPA) Special Session
7 - 8 am
Career Connections: Joanne Kamens Session - Not Networking 101: Building Professional Relationships for Success
(Breakfast served)
7:30 am - 6 pm
Registration Open
8 - 8:30 am
Morning Beverage Break
8:30 - 9 am
Keynote Session: Welcome and Opening Remarks
9 - 10 am
10 - 10:30 am
Keynote Speaker: Donald E. Ingber, Founding Director, Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard University
Beverage Break in the Exhibit Hall
10 am - 6:30 pm
Career Connections: ACS Mentoring Sessions / One-on-One Career Counseling Sessions / Job Boards
10 am - 6:30 pm
Exhibition Open
10 am - 6:30 pm
Poster Viewing in Exhibit Hall
10:30 am - 12:30 pm
10:30 am
Sponsored By:
Assay Development and Screening
Biochemical and Biophysical Methods in Screening; Session Chair: J. Fraser Glickman, The Rockefeller University
Monitoring Protein:Protein Interactions in Living Cells Using Bioluminescence Resonance Energy Transfer (BRET) – Novel Applications
of NanoBRET™ Technology; Graeme Walker, AstraZeneca
11 am
Assay Development and Screening for Difficult Targets Using High-Throughput SPE/ESI/Mass Spectrometry; J. Fraser Glickman,
The Rockefeller University
11:30 am
The Use of Virtual Screening, DSF and MicroScale Thermophoresis for the Rapid Identification of Fragments Active Against MEK1;
Alexey Rak, Sanofi-Aventis, R&D
12 pm
Screening for Novel Inhibitors of Thymidylate Synthase Using CETSA – A High-Throughput Target Engagement Assay;
Thomas Lundbäck, Karolinska Institutet
JALA & JBS Author Workshop: How to Get Your Work Published
Wednesday, February 11, 11:45 am - 1:15 pm
There are important tips that every prospective author should know before submitting a scientific manuscript for consideration by a
peer-reviewed journal. Edward Chow, Ph.D., of National University of Singapore (editor-in-chief of the Journal of Laboratory Automation)
shares step-by-step advice on how to design and write scientific research papers more clearly and effectively to improve their chances
for successful publication.
17
Monday, February 9 continued
10:30 am - 12:30 pm
Automation and High-Throughput Technologies
Machine-Learning Advances in the Life Sciencess; Session Chair: Robert Murphy, Carnegie Mellon University
10:30 am
Machine Learning and Neural Representations of Language Meaning; Tom Mitchell, Carnegie Mellon University
11 am
11:30 am
12 pm
10:30 am - 12:30 pm
A Machine Learning Analysis of Somatic Variants for Identifying Genes and Protein Domains That Influence Breast Cancer
Progression; Thomas Peterson, University of Maryland Baltimore County
Multitask Learning of Signaling and Regulatory Networks With Application to Studying Human Response to Flu; Siddhartha Jain,
Carnegie Mellon University
Protein Multi-Location Prediction: Using Bayesian Networks for Location Inter-Dependencies, and a Mixture Model; Ramanuja Simha,
University of Delaware
Bioanalytical Techniques
Recent Advances in Membrane Protein Characterization; Session Chair: Phoebe Stewart, Case Western Reserve University
10:30 am
Conformational Dynamics of GPCRs – Insights for the Rhodopsin System From X-Ray Crystallography and Site-Directed Spin Labeling;
Oliver Ernst, University of Toronto
11 am
Novel Technology Combination Dedicated to GPCR Allosteric and Biased Ligand Discovery; Nathalie Rouleau, Domain Therapeutics NA
11:30 am
12 pm
Parallel Screening of Multiple Muscarinic Receptors Using Multiparametric Cell-Based Assays; Emery Smith,
Scripps Research Institute
Crystallization of Membrane Proteins From Native Sources for X-Ray Crystallography and CryoEM Imaging of Membrane Proteins;
Phoebe Stewart, Case Western Reserve University
10:30 am - 12:30 pm
Informatics
Data Analysis Approaches for Cellular, Phenotypic, and High Content Screening; Session Chair: Marc Bickle
10:30 am
Uncovering Genetic and Chemical Relationships Using Image-Based Profiling; Anne Carpenter, Broad Institute
11 am
11:30 am
12 pm
10:30 am - 12:30 pm
10:30 am
11 am
11:30 am
12 pm
10:30 am - 12:30 pm
10:30 am
11 am
11:30 am
12 pm
Novel High Content Analytical Pipeline Without Positive Controls for Discovering Unknown Phenotypes; Marc Bickle, Max Planck
Institute of Molecular Cell Biology and Genetics
Standardizing Secondary Image Analysis With PerkinElmer’s High Content Profiler; Christopher Hale, Amgen
Man Versus Machine: Validating, Optimizing, and Predicting Outcomes in a Pipelined Analysis of a Clinical Flow Cytometry Study;
Michael Stadnisky, FlowJo, LLC
Micro/Nano Technologies
Microphysiological Systems; Session Chair: David Eddington, University of Illinois at Chicago
Precision Measurements of Neutrophil Migration in Health and Disease; Daniel Irimia, Massachusetts General Hospital,
Harvard Medical School
3-D Printed Microfluidic Devices and a New Approach to Drug and Biomarker Discovery; Dana Spence, Michigan State University
Skin Printer: Microfluidic Approach for Skin Regeneration and Wound Dressings; Lian Leng, University of Toronto
Microtissues Meet Microfluidics: A Body on a Chip Platform Technology Based on a Highly Parallel Standard SBS Layout;
Jens Kelm, InSphero
Special Session
European Government/Foundation Drug Discovery Initiatives; Session Chair: Steve Rees, AstraZeneca
Chemical Biology Consortium Sweden – Deliveries Including Scientific Highlights After Five Years; Annika Jenmalm Jensen,
Karolinska Institutet, ScilifeLab
EU-OPENSCREEN: Chemical Tools for the Life Sciences; Philip Gribbon, ScreeningPort Hamburg
The European Lead Factory: Game Changing for Innovative Medicine; Steven van Helden, Pivot Park Screening Centre
Opening “The Box of Delights” - Accessing Pharma to Enhance Academic Drug Discovery; Justin Bryans, MRC Technology
12:30 - 1:15 pm
Exhibitor Tutorials: Agilent Technologies; ARTEL; Cisbio Bioassays; Festo; IntelliCyt; MaxCyte; TTP Labtech
12:30 - 1:30 pm
Career Connections: Joanne Kamens Session - Smooth Transitions - Top 10 List: Things Scientists Ask About Finding an Industry Job
(Bring a box lunch)
12:30 - 1:30 pm
Lunch in the Exhibit Hall
12:30 - 1:45 pm
Exhibitor Tutorials: Brooks Automation; DiscoveRx; Labcyte; Thermo Scientific
12:45 - 1:45 pm
Special Update: SLAS in Europe
12:45 - 1:45 pm
Special Update: SLAS in Asia
1 - 3 pm
Poster Presentations (Even Numbered Posters)
2 - 2:45 pm
Exhibitor Tutorials: Genedata; Promega
2:30 - 3 pm
Beverage Break in the Exhibit Hall
18
Monday, February 9 continued
2:30 - 4:30 pm
3 - 5 pm
3 pm
3:30 pm
4 pm
Clinical Chemistry Trainee Council Info Session
Assay Development and Screening
Emerging Trends in High Content Screening; Session Chair: Shawn Burgess, NHGRI, National Institutes of Health (NIH)
Pattern Recognition for Imaging Assays in High Content Screens; Ilya Goldberg, Laboratory of Genetics,
National Institutes of Health (NIH)/NIA-IRP
A New Platform for High-Throughput Discovery of Autophogy Modulators That Does Not Require Engineered Cell Lines;
Robbie Narang, IntelliCyt
Convenient and Reliable HCS Screening With Distinct 3D Tumor Spheroids; Sebastien Degot, Cytoo
4:30 pm
High-Speed Acquisition of Sensitized Emission FRET in a High Content Imaging Assay; Matthias Fassler, PerkinElmer
3 - 5 pm
Automation and High-Throughput Technologies
Emerging Approaches to High-Throughput Screening of Membrane Bound Targets; Session Chair: Andrew Alt,
Bristol-Myers Squibb
3 pm
3:30 pm
4 pm
Regulation of GPCR Trafficking as a Therapeutic Target; P. Michael Conn, TTUHSC
New Technologies for Discovery, Characterization, and Development of G-Protein-Coupled Receptor and Ion Channel Probes and
Therapeutics; C. David Weaver, Vanderbilt University
Shining Light Into HTS Applications; Michela Stucchi, Axxam
4:30 pm
Application of Enzyme Fragment Complementation-Based Receptor Dimerization Assays to the Characterization and Optimization of
Biologics; Jane Lamerdin, DiscoveRx
3 - 5 pm
Bionalytical Techniques
Targeted Proteomics; Session Chair: Jacob Jaffe, Broad Institute
3 pm
3:30 pm
4 pm
Going Wide With Targeted MS Quantification of PTMs: Proteomic Connectivity Maps of Drugs, Genomics, and Disease;
Jacob Jaffe, Broad Institute
High-Throughput and Reproducible Workflows to Prepare Human Plasma Samples for Proteomic Analysis; Jenny Van Eyk,
Cedar-Sinai Medical Center
Automation of Apoptotic Protein Quantification for Selection of Combination Chemotherapy; John Koomen, Moffitt Cancer Center
4:30 pm
Translational Medicine Through Targeted Protein Quantitation: A Novel Automated Workflow for Biomarker Validation and Screening
and for Clinical Implementation; Selena Larkin, SISCAPA Assay Technologies
3 - 5 pm
Informatics
The Challenges of Managing Big Data and New Platforms for Quantitating Biology; Session Chair: Susan Gregurick,
National Institute of General Medical Sciences, National Institutes of Health
3 pm
3:30 pm
4 pm
The Challenges of Managing Big Data and New Platforms for Quantitating Biology, Susan Gregurick, National Institutes of Health (NIH)
Advantages of Visual Data Exploration Tools in the Analysis of qPCR, Microarray and Other OMICS Based Big Data,
Philip Skinner, PerkinElmer
Image-Based Label-Free Evaluation of Micro- and Macro-Movement of Cultured Cells; A Promising New Approach for Phenotypic
Screening, Shiori Oshima, Sony Corporation
4:30 pm
Tute Genomics: A Cloud-Based Platform for Genetic Diagnosis and Biomarker Discovery, Reid Robison, Tute Genomics
3 - 5 pm
Micro/Nano Technologies
Diagnostics and Point-of-Care Microdevices; Session Chair: Bobak Mosadegh, Cornell (Weil College of Medicine)
3 pm
3:30 pm
4 pm
Paper-Based Diagnostics: Meeting Healthcare Needs Across the Globe; Barbara Smith, Arizona State University
SpinDx: A Deployable Syndromic-Based Diagnostic System for Detection of Proteins, Nucleic Acids, and Cells; Chung-Yan Koh,
Sandia National Laboratories
A Universal Microfluidic Immunofiltration System for POC Diagnostic Applications; Claudia Gärtner, microfluidic ChipShop
4:30 pm
Bioinspired Spleen-on-a-Chip for Sepsis Therapy; Joo Hun Kang, Wyss Institute/Harvard University
3 - 5 pm
Special Session
The Commercialization of Laboratory Technologies: From Ideas to Reality (presented by the Journal of Laboratory Automation);
Session Chairs: Dean Ho, Division of Oral Biology and Medicine; The Jane and Jerry Weintraub Center for Reconstructive
Biotechnology; Department of Bioengineering; California NanoSystems Institute; Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center; and
Edward Chow, National University of Singapore
3 pm
3:30 pm
4 pm
4:30 pm
5 pm
Creativity Beyond the Science: Innovative Ways to Commercialize an Idea in the Global Industry;
Katherine Wang, BRIM Biotechnology, Inc.
Moving Research Innovations to the Market; Alicia Löffler, Northwestern University
Opportunities and Challenges in Life Sciences R&D; Jeremy Caldwell, Third Rock Ventures
MInding the Gaps in Biomedical Technology Translation; Megan Frisk, Science Translational Medicine/AAAS
Student Poster Award Announcement
19
Monday, February 9 continued
5:30 - 6:30 pm
Reception in Exhibit Hall Celebrating the 2015 SLAS Journal Achievement Award Honorees
6:30 - 8:30 pm
Late Night with LRIG - Rapid-Fire Innovation Session
6:30 - 8:30 pm
Special Session
An Evening With NIH; Session Chair: Christopher Austin, National Center for Advancing Translational
Sciences (NCATS)
Facilitated Translation Within NCATS’ TRND and BrIDGs Programs; John McKew, National Institutes of Health (NIH)/National Center
for Advancing Translational Sciences (NCATS)
NCI Experimental Therapeutics Program; Barbara Mroczkowski, National Cancer Institute
National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences (NCATS) SBIR and STTR Programs: Valuable Resources for Small Businesses;
Lili Portilla, National Center For Advancing Translational Sciences (NCATS)
NIH-Industry Partnership to Discover New Therapeutic Uses for Existing Molecules; Christine Colvis, National Center for Advancing
Translational Sciences (NCATS)
Tuesday, February 10, 2015
7 - 8:15 am
Career Connections: Dan Eustace Session - Mock Interviews: Preparation and Practice for Getting the Jobs You Want
(Breakfast served)
7:15 - 9 am
Analytical, Life Science and Diagnostic Association Special Session (Invitation Only)
7:30 - 8 am
Morning Beverage Break
7:30 am - 5:30 pm
8 - 9:15 am
Registration Open
Special Interest Groups: Academic Drug Discovery and Drug Repurposing(Joint Session); ADMET; Automation Quality Control; HCS/
HCA Data and Informatics; Screen Design and Assay Technology; Technology Transfer and CRO/CMO Project Management; Women
Professionals in Science and Technology
9:30 - 10:15 am
Exhibitor Tutorials: CYTOO, Genedata, Promega
9:30 am - 6 pm
Career Connections: ACS Mentoring Sessions / One-on-One Career Counseling Sessions / Job Boards
9:30 am - 6 pm
Exhibition Open
9:30 am - 6 pm
Poster Viewing in the Exhibit Hall
10 - 10:30 am
Beverage Break in the Exhibit Hall
10:30 am - 12:30 pm
10:30 am
11 am
11:30 am
12 pm
Sponsored By:
Assay Development and Screening
The Importance of Medicinal Chemistry in Screening; Session Chair: Michael Walters, University of Minnesota
Physicochemical Properties and HTS Triage; Philip Cox, AbbVie Inc.
PAINS in the Assays: ALARM NMR and Apparent Structure Activity Relationships as Useful Tools for Investigating the Basis of
Promiscuous Bioactivity in Real and Virtual High-Throughput Screens; Jayme Dahlin, Medical Scientist Training Program,
Mayo Clinic College of Medicine
Increasing the Success of AstraZeneca’s Hit ID Cascades; Mark Wigglesworth, AstraZeneca
HES – A Novel Approach to the Automated Discovery of New Drug Leads; Alan Katz, Hudson Robotics, Inc.
10:30 am - 12:30 pm
Automation and High-Throughput Technologies
Automating Phenotypic vs. Target Based Discovery: The Past, The Present, The Future; Session Chair: Ralf Schwander, Amgen
10:30 am
Flow Cytometry-Based Phenotypic Screening Combined With Smart Compound Selection Applied to the Identification of Cell Cycle
Perturbators; Daniela Brodbeck, Exquiron Biotech AG
11 am
11:30 am
12 pm
10:30 am - 12:30 pm
10:30 am
11 am
11:30 am
Integrated Phenotypic Screening and Untargeted Metabolomics for Natural Products Discovery; Roger Linington,
University of California, Santa Cruz
An Automated High-Throughput Imaging Screen for the Identification of Anti-Wolbachia Agents (Open Innovation in Practice);
Roger Clark, AstraZeneca
The Phenotypic Screening “Rule of 3”: Developing More Predictive Assays; Fabien Vincent, Pfizer
Bioanalytical Techniques
Advances in Analysis in Biological Matrices; Session Chair: Art Morales, Wilson Shou, Bristol-Myers Squibb
Affinity Capture Workflows for Novel Target Deconvolution; Shaun McLoughlin, AbbVie Laboratories
Strategies to Automating the Preparation of Samples for Quantitative Liquid Chromatography Tandem Mass Spectrometry in Discovery
and Clinical Research; Bernard Choi, Merck Research Laboratories
Acoustic Sample Deposition Coupled with LDTD-MS/MS Takes High-Throughput MS to the Next Level;
Zuzana Haarhoff, Bristol-Myers Squibb
20
Tuesday, February 10 continued
12 pm
10:30 am - 12:30 pm
10:30 am
Novel Acoustic Loading of a Mass Spectrometer – Towards Next Generation High-Throughput MS Screening;
Jonathan Wingfield, AstraZeneca
Biomarker Discovery and Applications
Biomarkers for Personalized Medicine; Session Chair: Mary Savage, Merck
The Simoa HD-1 Analyzer: A Fully-Automated, Multiplexed Immunoanalyzer With Single Molecule Sensitivity; David Duffy,
Quanterix Corporation
11 am
Zero Background in Homogeneous Proximity Assays Using Thermofluorimetric Analysis (TFA) for Quantitation of Attomole Protein
Levels in Serum; Joonyul Kim, Auburn University
11:30 am
An Automated Open Platform for Exclusion-Based Sample Preparation: Getting More Information From Limited Patient Samples;
David Guckenberger, University of Wisconsin - Madison
12 pm
Rapid Detection of Human Leukocyte Antigen Cancer Biomarkers Using Label-Free Photonic Biosensor Technology; Jon Weidanz,
Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center
10:30 am - 12:30 pm
10:30 am
11 am
11:30 am
12 pm
10:30 am - 12:30 pm
10:30 am
11 am
11:30 am
12 pm
Informatics
Facing the Challenges of Data Quality and Reproducibility; Session Chair: Leonard Freedman, Global Biological Standards Institute
Reproducibility and Standards in Preclinical Life Science Research; Leonard Freedman, Global Biological Standards Institute
The Role of Academic Drug Discovery in De-risking Public Data Mining, Emily Hull-Ryde, Center for Integrative Chemical Biology and
Drug Discovery; University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
What is the Current State of RNAi Screening?; Scott Martin, NIH/National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences (NCATS)
Presentation Title TBD; Brian Murphy, Bristol-Myers Squibb
Micro/Nano Technologies
Digital and Droplet Microfluidics; Session Chair: Amar Basu, Wayne State University
Digital Microfluidic Immunocytochemistry in Single Cells (DISC); Aaron Wheeler, University of Toronto
Rapid Detection of Bacteria and Antimicrobial Resistance in Unprocessed Blood Using the Integrated Comprehensive Droplet Digital
Detection (IC 3D) System; Weian Zhao, University of California, Irvine
Droplet-Based Three Dimensional Cell Migration Assay With Flow Cytometry Based Automated Analysis; Marie-Elena Brett,
University of Minnesota
Droplet-Based Microfluidics: Towards Massively Parallel Biological Experimentation; Andrew De Mello, ETH Zürich
12:30 - 1:15 pm
Exhibitor Tutorials: Agilent Technologies, ARTEL, Cisbio Bioassays, Essen BioScience, Festo; TTP Labtech
12:30 - 1:30 pm
Career Connections: Joanne Kamens Session - How to Choose Your Next Lab (Bring a box lunch)
12:30 - 1:30 pm
Lunch Break in the Exhibit Hall
12:30 - 1:45 pm
Exhibitor Tutorial: BioTek Instruments, Brook Automation, Cellular Dynamics International, Labcyte
1 - 3 pm
Poster Presentation (Odd Numbered Posters)
2 - 2:15 pm
New Product Award Announcement in Exhibt Hall
2:30 - 3 pm
Beverage Break in the Exhibit Hall
2:30 - 4:30 pm
3 - 5 pm
3 pm
3:30 pm
Member Center Event: ORCID Learn About This New Tool for Journal Authors
Assay Development and Screening
Natural Products in Screening; Session Chair: John Beutler, National Cancer Institute (NCI), NIH
Natural Product Screening Studies on Disease and Development Signaling Pathways; Masami Ishibashi, Chiba University
Meeting the Challenges of Identifying Novel Natural Products and Their Cancer-Related Targets Using Natural Products Chemistry,
High-Throughput Phenotypic Screening, and Functional Signature Ontology (FuSiOn); Bruce Posner, UT Southwestern Medical Center
4 pm
Combining Targeted Cell-Based Assays With Sample Processing to Identify Natural Product Modulators of Cancer-Related Targets;
Curtis Henrich, Leidos Biomedical Research/National Cancer Institute
4:30 pm
Development a Screening Method for Echinocandin Antifungal Drugs by Capillary Electrophoresis and Laser Induced Fluorescence;
Chaohui Sun, Tianjin University
3 – 5 pm
Automation and High-Throughput Technologies
Flow Based Approaches to High-Throughput Chemistry, Assaying, and Formulation; Session Chair: Ferenc Darvas,
Institute of Innovations
3 pm
3:30 pm
4 pm
High-Throughput Approaches in Medicinal Chemistry; Aaron Beeler, Boston University
Qualitative and Quantitative Analysis of ADC Payload by CESI-MS; Andras Guttman, Northeastern University
Flow Technology for Improving Bioavailability and ADME Properties of API’s and Drug Candidates by Nanoparticle Formation;
Ferenc Darvas, Institute of Innovations
21
Tuesday, February 10 continued
4:30 pm
Fast Flow Peptide Synthesis; Bradley Pentelute, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
3 - 5 pm
Biomarker Discovery and Applications
Biomarker Discovery Technologies; Session Chair: David Hirschberg, University of Washington Tacoma, and Geneva Institute
3 pm
3:30 pm
4 pm
Biomarkers for Environmental Surveillance; David Hirschberg, University of Washington Tacoma, and Geneva Institute
Using Protein Domain Arrays to Screen for Peptide and Chemical Ligands; Mark Bedford, University of Texas
High Content Image Based Screening of a Small Molecule Library Against Host Cellular Pathways Identifies Novel Antivirals Targeting
Rift Valley Fever Virus and Several Highly Pathogenic RNA Viruses; Krishna Kota, United States Army Medical Research Institute of
Infectious Diseases
4:30 pm
Synthesis and Cell-Free Cloning of DNA Using Programmable Microfluidics; Tuval Ben Yehezkel, SynVaccine and the Weizmann
Institute of Science
3 - 5 pm
Drug Target Strategies
Chemical Biology Approaches to Understanding Mechanism of Action; Session Chair: Terry Riss, Promega
3 pm
Interrogating Intracellular Drug Affinity and Residence Time to Characterize the Mode of Action of HDAC Inhibitors;
Keith Wood, Promega
3:30 pm
Annotating Biological Activities of Compounds by High-Content Pathway Profiling Assays; Sergei Makarov, Attagene
4 pm
Large-Scale Kinase Profiling for Drug Discovery; Jeffrey Peterson, Fox Chase Cancer Center
4:30 pm
New Target Prediction and Visualization Tools Incorporating Open Source Molecular Fingerprints For TB Mobile 2.0; Sean Ekins,
Collaborative Drug Discovery
3 - 5 pm
Informatics
Open and Public Sources of Data; Session Chair: John Overington, EMBL-EBI
3 pm
Open Data to Support Screening Library Design, Target Deorphanisation and Lead Optimisation; John Overington, EMBL-EBI
3:30 pm
The Open PHACTS Discovery Platform – Semantic Data Integration for Life Sciences; Bryn Williams-Jones, The Open PHACTS
Foundation
4 pm
The Allotrope Framework: An Innovative Approach to Improve Data Interchange, Increase Research Efficiency and Maximize the Value
of Your Data; James Roberts, GlaxoSmithKline
4:30 pm
Help Maximize the Impact of Your Research: Make Your Data Public!; Benjamin Shoemaker, National Institutes of Health
3 - 5 pm
Micro/Nano Technologies
Micro and Nanofluidics for Bioanalytical Systems; Session Chair: Christopher Easley, Auburn University
3 pm
3:30 pm
4 pm
4:30 pm
5 - 5:30 pm
Droplet Microfluidics for High-Throughput Analysis and Sensing; Robert Kennedy, University of Michigan
High-Throughput Dynamic Single-Cell Gene Expression Analysis in 3D Organoids and Tissues; Pak Kin Wong, The University of Arizona
Integrated Microfluidic Systems for In Vivo Monitoring of Neurotransmitters; Maojun Gong, Wichita State University
Tailor-Made Nanoliter Protein Quantitation Through Microfluidics, Proximity Assays, and Thermal Control; Christopher Easley, Auburn
University, Chemistry and Biochemistry
Passport to Prizes Winners Announced in Exhibit Hall
5 - 6 pm
Exhibition Closing Reception
7 - 10 pm
SLAS2015 Reception at Smithsonian National Air & Space Museum
Sponsored By:
Wednesday, February 11, 2015
8 - 8:30 am
Morning Beverage Break
8 am - 1:30 pm
Registration Open
8:30 - 9:30 am
Keynote: Francis Collins, Director National Institutes of Health (NIH)
9:45 - 11:45 am
Assay Development and Screening
Assay Platforms for Biologics; Session Chair: Torben Straight Nissen, Pfizer CTI
9:45 am
Antibodies With Optimal Biotherapeutic Properties From Deep Microfludic Screening; Will Somers, Pfizer
10:15 am
Automated High-Throughput Generation of Bispecific Antibodies Via Controlled Fab-Arm Exchange; Arnout Gerritsen, Genmab bv
10:45 am
Cell Based Assays for Biologics Drug Discovery; Caroline Colley, MedImmune
11:15 am
Developing Functional Monoclonal Antibodies for Beta3 Adrenergic Receptor; Helena Mancebo, Multispan
9:45 - 11:45 am
9:45 am
Automation and High-Throughput Technologies
Non-Traditional Automated Technologies for HTS; Session Chair: Louis Scampavia, The Scripps Research Institute Florida
Automation of Label-Free Analytical Technologies for Hit Identification and Optimization: An Overview; Thomas Roddy, Beryllium
22
Wednesday, February 11 continued
10:15 am
Application of High-Throughput Mass Spectrometry to Enable Challenging Targets and Reduce False Positives From uHTS Screens;
Gregory Adam, Merck
10:45 am
Qube – 384 Well, Automated Patch Clamp; Richard Kondo, Biolin Scientific
11:15 am
96-Well Nanoplasmonic Microplate for Surface Plasmon Resonance Molecular Screening in Regular Microplate Readers;
Logan Liu, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
9:45 - 11:45 am
Biomarker Discovery and Applications
Translational Medicine; Session Chair: Daniel Chelsky, Caprion Proteomics
9:45 am
Quantifying 190 Proteins in a Single Assay Without Antibodies Using MRM Mass Spectrometry; Daniel Chelsky, Caprion Proteomics
10:15 am
Analyzing the Most Frequent Disease Loci in Targeted Patient Categories Optimizes Disease Gene Identification and Test Accuracy
Worldwide; Roger Lebo, Akron Children’s Hospital/Northeast Ohio College of Medicine
10:45 am
Replication of 50 High Impact Preclinical Cancer Studies to Examine Rates of Reproducibility; Tim Errington, Center for Open Science
11:15 am
Biomarker Qualification at CDER, FDA; Shashi Amur, OTS/CDER/FDA
9:45 - 11:45 am
Drug Target Strategies
Physiologically Relevant Target Strategies; Session Chair: G. Sitta Sittampalam, National Institutes of Health (NIH)/National Center
for Advancing Translational Sciences (NCATS)
9:45 am
A Chemical Biology Approach Using Primary Human Cell Systems and Co-Cultures for Understanding Target Biology; Ellen Berg,
BioSeek, a division of DiscoveRx
10:15 am
Combinatorial Approach of Cell and Small Animal Models for Target Validation; Satish Srinivas Kitambi, Karolinska Institutet
10:45 am
Precise Genome Editing and Stem Cell Technologies - Novel Tools for Novel Medicines; Lorenz Mayr, AstraZeneca
11:15 am
Repurposing “Failed” Drugs to Treat Pediatric Sarcomas; Andrew Napper, Nemours Center for Childhood Cancer Research
9:45 - 11:45 am
Informatics
Using Mobile, Web, and Cloud Technologies to Improve the Process and Communication of Research;
Session Chair: Lenny Teytelman, ZappyLab
9:45 am
Creating a Marketplace for Scientific Collaboration; Elizabeth Iorns, Science Exchange
10:15 am
10 Years Securely Hosting Collaborative Drug Discovery CDD Vault in a Single, Privately Managed “Cloud”; Barry Bunin, Collaborative
Drug Discovery (CDD, Inc.)
10:45 am
Getting Credit for All Your Research With figshare; Mark Hahnel, figshare
11:15 am
Protocols.io: Central Repository for the Knowledge That Perishes Because We Do Not Publish It; Lenny Teytelman, ZappyLab
9:45 - 11:45 am
Micro/Nano Technologies
Overcoming Nanotechnologies Challenges; Session Chair: Andrew De Mello, ETH Zürich
9:45 am
Tissue-Like Materials From Communicating Droplet Networks; Hagan Bayley
10:15 am
Rapid Detection of Single Bacteria in Unprocessed Blood Using the Integrated Comprehensive Droplet Digital Detection (IC 3D)
System; Dong-Ku Kang, University of California, Irvine
10:45 am
In Situ SERS Imaging of Surfactants in Emulsion Interfaces Using Amphiphilic Gold Nanoparticles; Lili He,
University of Massachusetts Amherst
11:15 am
Reversible Aptamer-Au Plasmon Rulers for Single-Molecule Detection of Secreted Matrix Metalloproteinases;
Somin Eunice Lee, University of Michigan
11:30 am - 12 pm
11:45 am - 1:15 pm
12 - 1:15 pm
1:30 - 3:30 pm
1:30 pm
2 pm
2:30 pm
Lunch for Full Conference Participants
JALA & JBS Author Workshop: How to Get Your Work Published
Special Interest Groups: Automated Sample Preparation of Pharmaceutical Dosage Forms; Informatics; Labware Leachables;
Phenotypic Drug Discovery; Sample Management; Standards Initiatives; Stem Cells and 3D Microtissues
Assay Development and Screening
Cell Based Assays and Screening; Session Chair: Andrew Napper, Nemours Center for Childhood Cancer Research
Spheroid Culture Screening in Anti-Cancer Drug Discovery; David Evans, Frederick National Lab for Cancer Research, Leidos Biomed
Rapid In Vivo Chemical Screening Identifies Anti-Metastatic Drugs; Viviana Gallardo, NHGRI/National Institutes of Health (NIH)
Identification of Novel Small-Molecule Modulators of CRMP2 Phosphorylation as Lithium Mimetics Using High-Throughput Screening
in Human iPSC-Derived Neurons; Wendy Zhao, Massachusetts General Hospital
23
Wednesday, February 11 continued
3 pm
Multi-Phenotype Compound Screening for Cardiac Hypertrophy Using Patient Specific Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Derived
Cardiomyocytes; Ulrich Broeckel, Medical College of Wisconsin
1:30 - 3:30 pm
Automation and High-Throughput Technologies
Advances in High-Throughput Analytics and Automation; Session Chair: Roger Bosse, PerkinElmer Life Sciences & Technology
1:30 pm
Spectral High Content Screening of Small Molecules in Live Cells Using Novel Dyes; Jarkko Ylanko, Sunnybrook Research Institute
2 pm
2:30 pm
3 pm
1:30 - 3:30 pm
Pushing the Limits in High-Throughput; Thomas Lade, DuPont Pioneer Research Automation
From Brackets to Body Parts - How 3D Printing is Changing the Way We Work; Stephen Trowbridge, GlaxoSmithKline
Automated Native Sample Preparation for Proteome Analysis in 384-Well Microplates – Fast, Comprehensive and Precise; Heidrun
Rhode, Institute of Biochemistry I, University Hospital Jena
Drug Target Strategies
New Approaches for Interrogating High Value Targets; Session Chair: Marcie Glicksman, Brigham and Women’s Hospital
and Harvard Medical School
1:30 pm
The Future of Kinase Irreversible Inhibitors in Neurodegenerative Diseases; Min Liu, Brigham and Women's Hospital
2 pm
Strategies for the Discovery and Evaluation of Non-Inhibitory Small Molecule Chaperones of Glucocerebrosidase With
Therapeutic Potential for the Treatment of Gaucher and Parkinson’s Disorders; Juan Marugan, National Center for
Advancing Translational Sciences
2:30 pm
Discovery of an Allosteric JAK Inhibitor Through Primary T Cell High-Throughput Screening; Atli Thorarensen, Pfizer
3 pm
1:30 - 3:30 pm
1:30 pm
2 pm
2:30 pm
3 pm
Kinetics of Activity Enhancement by the NSD2 E1099K and T1150A Mutations and Identification of Selective Inhibitor Compounds;
Konrad Howitz, Reaction Biology Corp.
Informatics
Enhancing Lab Automation Via Software; Session Chair: Jamie McQuay, Scimatic Software
Data Driven Automation: Integrating Automation with Informatics Systems; David Dambman, BioSero
MSITES: A Powerful Informatics Solution for High-Throughput Screening Centers; Renju Jacob, Center for Chemical Genomics,
University of Michigan
Escaping Digital Dementia in Lab Automation: A Perspective on Closed Loop Electronic Laboratory Notebooks; Martin Koch,
Fraunhofer IPA
Real Time Predictive Modeling of Clinical Samples in Transit to Ensure Sample Viability; Jarie Bolander, Lab Sensor Solutions
1:30 - 3:30 pm
Micro/Nano Technologies
Commericialization Strategies for Micro and Nanofluidic Devices; Session Chair: Rajiv Bharadwaj, 10x
1:30 pm
Mainstreaming Microfluidics: Keys to Navigating Commercialization; Josh Molho, Zephyrus Biosciences
2 pm
2:30 pm
3 pm
3:30 - 3:45 pm
Automation of Droplet Manipulation Using Electrowetting On Film, Thomas Perroud, Tecan Systems
All-in-One Microfluidics Automated Platform for Synthetic Biology; Gregory Linshiz, Lawerence Berkeley National Laboratory
Immediate Drop on Demand Technology – A Novel Technology for Cell Dispensing in Nanoliter Range; Lena Schober,
Fraunhofer Institute for Manufacturing Engineering and Automation IPA
Beverage Break
3:45 - 5 pm
Closing Keynote Speaker Laurie Garrett, Author, journalist and authority on global health issues
Announcement of the SLAS Innovation Award Winner
5 - 5:30 pm
Book Signing with Keynote Speaker Laurie Garrett
SLAS Membership Has its Privileges
> Significant savings on registration to SLAS conferences CLICK HERE
> Unlimited access to SLAS Webinars CLICK HERE
> Online access and print subscriptions to JALA and/or JBS CLICK HERE
> Exclusive access to the Annual North American Survey of Laboratory Trends CLICK HERE
24
Join, renew or
update your SLAS
membership online.
View Here
SPECIAL INTEREST
GROUPS (SIGS)
SLAS SIGs allow you to connect directly with peers who
share similar interests and expertise in specific areas
of scientific technology. SIGs are a great way to discuss
leading-edge trends, meet recognized experts, and
collaborate with like-minded peers. Following is a listing of
SLAS SIGs scheduled to meet at SLAS2015.
tuesday, february tenth, 8 - 9:15 am
Academic Drug Discovery and
Drug Repurposing (Joint Session)
Andrew Napper, Chair
The mission of the Academic Drug Discovery SIG
is to enable greater interaction between academia,
pharmaceutical research companies, suppliers and other
technical companies. Through a range of unique programs
and events, the Academic Drug Discovery SIG builds
bridges between academia and applied sciences. These
ties result in better skilled candidates for industry as well
as enhanced support for academic centers with programs
focused on drug discovery, screening, automation and
related disciplines.
Roger Bosse, Chair
The SIG on Drug Repurposing is a broad-based
Biomolecular Sciences Section initiative allowing its
members to proactively address the specific challenges
pertaining to their respective fields of expertise (technical,
operational, legal, etc.) in relation to needs and benefits of
repurposing drugs.
ADMET
integration of higher throughput technologies with
methods for determining toxicity, pharmacokinetics and
metabolism. The goal is to accelerate the drug discovery
pipeline and shorten the time of the development of new
drugs that cure illnesses and improve quality of life.
This special interest group creates a bridge and network
between scientists working in the fields of preclinical
research, pharmacology, pharmacokinetics and those who
are the producers of combinatorial libraries.
Automation Quality Control
John Thomas Bradshaw and Craig Schulz, Chairs
The Automation Quality Control SIG provides a forum for
discussing topics relating to optimizing performances of
laboratory instrumentation. The objective is to encourage
development of procedures that should be of interest to
instrument vendors and practitioners alike. Specific
topics include:
• Developing best practices for assessing performance of
liquid handlers, microplate readers and integrated systems
with a view toward making it easier to compare instruments
between vendors and to correlate results across platforms.
• Promoting the sharing of experiences and ideas on data
formatting during acquisition and export. Techniques
and strategies that ease the task of integrating new
instrumentation into automated environments are of
special interest.
HCS/HCA Data and Informatics
Paul Johnston, Chair
This SIG is dedicated to sharing best practices, experiences
and expertise, and to encouraging collaboration. The
group actively addresses issues in the area of information
technology and strategies to foster discussions,
information sharing and meetings among group members.
This SIG is presented in partnership with the Society of
Biomolecular Imaging and Informatics (SBI2).
David M. Stresser, Chair
Visit the SLAS SIGs
LinkedIn Groups
The mission of the Absorption, Distribution, Metabolism
and Toxicology SIG is to advance drug discovery
and development by promoting the discussion and
dissemination of principles, topics and ideas for the
View Here
25
Screen Design and
Assay Technology
wednesday, february eleventh, 12 - 1:15 pm
Automated Sample Preparation of
Pharmaceutical Dosage Forms
Kenda Evans and Jim Beasley, Chairs
The goals of the Screen Design and Assay SIG are to:
Brian Kozlowski and Khanh Ha, Chairs
• Share current best practices and experiences in the
design of screens for high- and ultra high-throughput
screening programs.
This SIG is dedicated to the discussion of current and
future automation platforms used in sample preparation
of pharmaceutical dosage forms (tablets, capsules,
injectables, blends) for a variety of tests conducted in
the industry, including dissolution, composite assay, and
content uniformity analysis. A variety of topics are covered,
such as establishing equivalency between automated
and non-automated methods, handling equipment bias,
equipment validation, automation tools used to support
formulation development, risk analysis, QbD principles,
real-time analytics, stability and release testing, and
overall best practices in use of automation. This SIG’s
goals are to achieve an industry benchmark for use of
automated techniques in drug development and to
garner input from key representatives from
automation companies.
• Provide a platform to encourage an open discussion of any
new screening technologies that can be beneficial to the
screening community.
• Encourage academic and industrial members to actively
contribute to the SIG.
• Identify any gaps in reagent(s) and instrumentation and/
or in the screening environment, and seek to influence the
appropriate supplier(s).
• Evaluate new technologies and instruments on a voluntary
basis and share findings at technology-based user group
meetings on a more frequent basis.
Technology Transfer and CRO/
CMO Project Management
Informatics
Liming Shi and Raymond Price, Chairs
As biopharmaceutical companies seek to increase capacity,
free up resources, accelerate clinical timelines, and meet
business continuity requirements, technology transfer
to contract research organizations (CROs) or contract
manufacturing organizations (CMOs) has increased
dramatically. This special interest group (SIG) provides a
platform for industry colleagues to address and discuss the
challenges and key factors considered to be important for
achieving successful transfer.
Women Professionals in Science
and Technology
Viral Vyas and Dawei Lin, Chairs
The SLAS Informatics SIG provides software developers an
opportunity to better understand and influence the state
of informatics in the laboratory. The focus of this SIG is on
systems architecture from the board to the user interface
and thus includes topics such as hardware/software
interfaces, data management, metadata management,
asynchronous coding and operating systems, networking
and “big data issues.” The SIG welcomes participation
by developers from academia, industry and the
vendor community.
Robyn Rourick, Chair
The purpose of this group is to establish a collaborative
forum for Women Professionals in Science and Technology
to connect and create a diverse network for sharing
experiences and tools for development and success.
Learn More in ELN
View Here
26
Labware Leachables
Sample Management
Lynn Rasmussen, Chair
Paul Calvin and Timothy Dawes, Chairs
You know what you added to your assay plate, but do you
know what the plate added to your assay? We tend to think
of plastics as inert, but they are not. Plastics can bind
components from the assay cocktail. This characteristic
is exploited for assays like ELISA where the binding of
proteins from the solution is required. It can also interfere
with the assay if components that need to be in solution
bind to the plastic labware. Another phenomena associated
with plastic labware is the leaching of chemical entities
from the labware into the liquid reagents dispensed to
them. Unpolymerized monomers, mold release agents
and plasticizers are some of the things that can leach out
of the plastic and into your reagents and assays. Higher
density plates, with a larger wetted surface area to liquid
volume ratio, and new plastics like COC have increased the
probability that the labware chemistry could be affecting
the assay results.
The Sample Management SIG provides a forum for
discussing sample library management issues in the
modern drug-discovery high-throughput screening
laboratory. Sample libraries include discrete compounds,
defined compound mixtures, natural product extracts, and
biologics (tissues, cells, DNA, RNA, and antibodies). Topics
of critical importance include issues involved in:
Phenotypic Drug Discovery
Jonathan Lee, Chair
The Phenotypic Drug Discovery (PDD) SIG serves as a
discussion forum for the global research community to
share/discuss/debate topics related to PDD research.
Participants will share their experiences, perceptions,
and thoughts on the advantages/disadvantages of PDD
and whether/how PDD complements targeted drug
discovery (TDD) strategies. Related topics such as target
identification/validation, chemical diversity, chemical
genomics, chemo-informatics, poly-pharmacology,
translational pharmacology, biological model systems and
patient tailoring are also in scope.
• Sample Collection: sample acquisition, structural diversity,
physical storage, physical manipulation, sample purity and
stability.
• Materials Management: logistics, information technology,
customer support, quality control and systems integration.
• Instrumentation and Laboratory Automation: sample
preparation, sample retrieval, screening set creation,
non-scale technologies, and analytical methodologies.
Standards Initiatives
Burkhard Schaefer and Dana Vanderwall, Chairs
The Standards Initiatives SIG promotes standardization
and interoperability of instruments and data systems
in the laboratory. The purpose of this session is to raise
awareness of community-driven standardization efforts
currently underway. It also provides a forum to foster
collaboration between standards initiatives to
ensure greater impact and better utilization of
community resources.
Stem Cells and 3D Microtissues
Marcie Glicksman and Sitta Sittampalam, Chairs
The mission of the Stem Cells and 3D Microtissues in
Drug Discovery SIG is to promote the discussion and
dissemination of information on new enabling technologies
related to the use of stem cells and primary cells in drug
discovery. This group discusses current developments
in stem cell biology, human and mouse pluripotent stem
cells, and reprogrammed stem cells. This SIG functions to
create a bridge between the network of scientists working
in the fields of regenerative medicine, stem cell biology,
chemical biology and drug discovery.
27
TRANSFORM
INNOVATION
CELEBRATE EXCELLENCE
The Society’s highest honors recognize significant
contributions to the field of laboratory science and
technology by SLAS members, students, conference
participants and companies.
Student Poster Competition
This cash award of $500 is awarded to the top three
student poster winners at SLAS2015. The winning posters
are showcased in the SLAS Member Center and on
SLAS2015.org. Additionally, the winners are interviewed by
The Lab Man for his blog and podcast. The poster award
ceremony takes place Monday, February 9, at 5 pm.
The SLAS Student
Poster Competition
$10,000 SLAS Innovation Award
is a launching pad for the work of
the next generation of scientists.
Read the SLAS ELN feature where
SLAS2014 Student Poster Award
Winners share their stories.
This $10,000 cash prize award
recognizes the work behind one
SLAS2015 scientific podium
presentation that is exceedingly innovative and contributes
to the exploration of technologies in the laboratory. Last
year’s winner was Patrick P. Beattie, Diagnostics for All,
for his award winning presentation: Paper-Based Sensors
for Low-Cost Diagnostics. The Innovation Award winner
is named during the closing session of SLAS2015 on
Wednesday afternoon, February 11.
SLAS Young Scientist Award
SLAS partners with the Institute of Food Technologists
(IFT), ELRIG and MipTec to recognize and award the top
student poster presenters at their annual conferences.
Winners of this prestigious award receive a $500 cash
prize, as well as complimentary registration and roundtrip
travel and lodging at SLAS2015, where they present
their posters.
Tony B. Academic Travel Awards
The Tony B. Academic Travel Award
Program recognizes up-and-coming
researchers from across the globe who
demonstrate outstanding achievement and
potential in laboratory science and technology. 56 students
are attending SLAS2015 as Tony B. awardees. The Tony B.
Academic Travel Awards include roundtrip coach airfare,
conference registration and hotel accommodations. Each
scholarship recipient actively participates in the conference
by delivering a podium presentation or a poster.
See list of SLAS2015 Tony B. Scholarship winners.
View Here
The 2014 SLAS Young Scientist Award delegates are:
Institute of Food Technologists (IFT)
Kang Pan, University of Tennessee, Knoxville
ph-Driven Encapsulation of Curcumin in Self-Assembled
Casein Nanoparticles for Enhanced Dispersibility
and Bioactivity
ELRIG
George Burslem, University of Leeds
The Design, Synthesis and Evaluation of Inhibitors of the
HIF-1α/p300 Protein-Protein Interaction
MipTec
Katja-Emilia Lillsunde, University of Helsinki, Finland
An Advanced Cellular Assay for Replicon-Based Antiviral
Screening of Marine Natural Product
28
TRANSFORM
YOUR NETWORK
With more than 5,000 attendees from across the globe
and a diverse set of industry backgrounds, SLAS2015 is
an ideal venue to meet fellow researchers, share “tales
from the front,” learn from others’ experiences and build
a network of professional contacts that can be counted
on year-round. From hallway conversations to evening
receptions, SLAS2015 is a great way to build both personal
and professional relationships. Be sure to bring a healthy
supply of business cards.
sunday, february eighth
Reception in Exhibit Hall (5:30 - 7 pm)
Student and Early Career Professional Reception
(7:30 - 9:30 pm)
monday, february ninth
Promega Sunrise Run (6:30 am)
Reception in Exhibit Hall (5:30 - 6:30 pm)
tuesday, february tenth
Reception in Exhibit Hall, with Passport to Prizes awards
announcement (5 - 6 pm)
SLAS2015 Reception at Smithsonian National Air &
Space Museum (7 - 10 pm)
For Runners and Early Morning Sightseers
On Monday, February 9, get an early start to your day by
participating in the Promega Sunrise Run. Join fellow
runners (or walkers) for a 4.2mi/6.8km route that passes
by the US Capitol, the Washington Monument, the Lincoln
Memorial, and the White House as the sun comes up over
the city. The Promega Sunrise Run departs from
the Marriott Marquis lobby at 6:30 am. Note: The
Sunrise Run is an optional event and is not an official
SLAS2015 function.
For Students and Early Career Professionals
On the evening of Sunday, February 8, all students and
early career professionals attending SLAS2015 are invited
to Lucky Strike] where you can relax and mingle with your
peers while enjoying an evening of bowling! This evening
is FREE to all student and early career attendees, and
designed to help you connect and network in an informal
setting. The evening includes lane rental, as well as
appetizers and non-alcoholic beverages. A cash bar
is available.
For International Attendees
To help make international attendees feel welcome, the
SLAS2015 exhibition area features a Global Village. This
venue hosts members of the SLAS professional team from
the Society’s Europe and Asia offices. In addition, attendees
can use the Global Village as a meeting point to connect
with other conference attendees from their home region.
DISCOVER SLAS THROUGH
OUR MEMBERS
SLAS assists members in advancing their knowledge
and careers. Meet SLAS members – and hear their
personal stories of success enabled by the Society –
in a new video series. Watch the series at
www.ourmembers.slas.org
29
SLAS2015 RECEPTION
AT THE SMITHSONIAN
NATIONAL AIR AND
SPACE MUSEUM
tuesday, february tenth, 7 - 10 pm
Join your fellow SLAS2015 attendees for food and drinks to
explore the Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum
on the evening of Tuesday, February 10. The Smithsonian
National Air and Space Museum maintains the world’s
largest and most significant collection of aviation and
space artifacts, encompassing all aspects of human flight,
as well as related works of art and archival materials.
Included among the thousands of exhibits and displays
are the 1903 Wright Flyer, Charles Lindbergh’s Spirit of St.
Louis, the Apollo 11 Command Module Columbia, and a
lunar rock that you can touch.
Complimentary and continuous shuttle bus service for
SLAS2015 attendees is provided between the Marriott Marquis
and the Museum for this event. Access to this event is free-ofcharge to SLAS2015 registrants.
Generously sponsored by
30
Schedule of Special Events
and Appearances
Meet JALA Editor-in-Chief Ed Chow
sunday, february eighth, 5 - 6 pm
Talk one-on-one with the new JALA editor-inchief, Edward Kai-Hua Chow, Ph.D., of the
Centre for Translational Medicine at the
National University of Singapore. Find out how
the Journal of Laboratory Automation can
further the discoverability and success of your
scientific achievements.
SLAS SCIENTIFIC
JOURNALS AT SLAS2015
Meet JBS Editor-in-Chief Bob Campbell
sunday, february eighth, 5 - 6 pm
Visit with the editor-in-chief of the Journal of
Biomolecular Screening, Robert M. Campbell,
Ph.D., of Eli Lilly and Company, Indianapolis, IN,
and find out how you can use JBS to inform and
advance your drug discovery research.
SLAS publishes two rigorously peer-reviewed, MEDLINEindexed scientific journals in partnership with SAGE
Publications — the Journal of Biomolecular Screening
(JBS) and the Journal of Laboratory Automation (JALA).
Both journals are celebrating 20 years of publication in
2015. To commemorate this anniversary,
a series of special activities is planned
throughout SLAS2015.
Clinical Chemistry Trainee Council
Info Session
monday, february ninth, 2:30 - 4:30 pm
Meet the Clinical Chemistry journal’s Managing
Editor Sheehan Misko to learn about the Clinical
Chemistry Trainee Council and what it offers
young professionals.
Visit the SLAS Journals Information Station
(located in the SLAS Member Center on
the Exhibit Floor) to meet members of the
publishing team, learn more about each journal’s editorial
scope and find out:
ORCID: Learn About this New Tool for
Journal Authors
tuesday, Feb. 10 from 2:30 - 4:30 pm
Meet ORCID Executive Director Laure Haak
and find out first-hand what the ORCID (Open
Researcher and Contributor ID) system is and how
you can benefit from it. Plus, register on-the-spot
for your own persistent identifier.
• How to search, secure and manage information via JALA
Online and JBS Online
• How to submit an original scientific manuscript
• How to increase awareness, discoverability and citations of
your published manuscripts
• How to vote for your favorite finalist in the 2015 JALA & JBS
Art of Science Contest
SLAS Author Meet & Greets
monday and tuesday, february ninth and
tenth (times TBD)
Visit the SLAS Member Center to say hello, ask
questions and get to know authors of some of
JALA and JBS’s most innovative research. Enjoy
face-to-face conversations about their work, your
work and the new ideas shaping some of today’s
most promising research. More information
including author names and appearance times
to follow.
SLAS journal activities at SLAS2015 also include a
Special Session on The Commercialization of Laboratory
Technologies: From Ideas to Reality (SEE PAGE 11) and the
JALA & JBS Author Workshop: How to Get Your Work
Published (SEE PAGE 17)
31
SLAS MEMBER CENTER
The SLAS Member Center is THE place for members – and nonmembers – to learn everything there is to know about the
many year-round benefits and services available through SLAS. Conveniently located in the SLAS2015 Exhibit Hall, the
Member Center is central hub for SLAS information and activity, including:
Career Services
Passport to Prizes
Take advantage of FREE career services, see page 33 for
additional details.
Play the Passport to Prizes game, and you could win
fabulous prizes. To play, simply visit some of the many
exhibitors participating in the SLAS2015 Exhibition and
have your passport card stamped at their booth. Submit
your completed passport to the SLAS Member Center and
return for the prize drawing on Tuesday, February 10,
at 5 pm. (Only those present at the prize drawing will be
eligible to win.)
Live Podcasts
With The Lab Man
monday, february ninth
5 pm – Interview with the Student Poster
Competition Winners
Washington DC Area’s Top
F.I.R.S.T. Robotics Teams
tuesday, february tenth
10:30 am – Interview with new SLAS Board members
11 am – Interview with JBS and JALA Editors in Chief Bob Campbell and Ed Chow
4 pm – Interview with the New Product Award winners
The Lab Man Schedule is tentative and subject to change.
Award Announcements
Student Poster Competition Award winners are announced
at 5 pm on Monday, February 9. The SLAS Journal
Achievement Awards are announced at the Monday evening
reception in the Exhibit Hall. The SLAS2015 New Product
Award (NPA) winners are annouced Tuesday, February 10,
at 2 pm.
F.I.R.S.T. (For Inspiration and
Recognition of Science and
Technology) was founded in
1989 by inventor Dean Kamen
to inspire an appreciation
of science and technology
in young people. The F.I.R.S.T. Robotics Competition is
a global experience that helps young scientists see the
value of education and careers in science, technology,
engineering, and math. SLAS is once again proud to
welcome F.I.R.S.T. as a partner at SLAS2015.
In addition, in the Member Center you can receive a guided tour of SLAS.org, a review of your SLAS member benefits,
and some great giveaways. Members of the SLAS leadership and the Society’s professional team are available to answer
questions and point out all that SLAS has to offer to benefit you not only at SLAS2015, but year-round.
32
YOUR CAREER
Career Workshops
SLAS2015 provides unique access and resources to help
you accelerate your career and distinguish yourself in a
competitive job market.
Not Networking 101 – Building Professional
Relationships for Success
Career Services
Monday, February 9, 7 - 8 am (breakfast served)
Review job postings in the newly redesigned Career
Connections section of the SLAS Member Center. Post
your résumé for prospective employers. Participate in an
individual career coaching session, or have your résumé
reviewed by a recognized scientific career expert.
This workshop is designed to reintroduce you to how strong
professional relationships can be necessary for most
people to succeed in their careers. It provides practical
tools for meeting people and for nurturing new and
established connections.
Mentoring
Smooth Transitions – Top 10 List: Things Scientists
Ask About Finding an Industry Job
Benefit from a mentoring session with an established
professional scientist local to DC. Members of American
Chemical Society (ACS) will provide complimentary
mentoring and career advice. Advance sign-up will be
offered through SLAS2015.org.
Monday, February 9, 12:30 - 1:30 pm (bring a box lunch)
This presentation provides criteria to consider in deciding
if embarking on an industry science career is right for
you and then provides concrete tools and resources for
preparing for this transition.
Workshops
Mock Interviews: Preparation and Practice for
Getting the Jobs You Want
Tuesday, February 10, 7 - 8:15 am (breakfast served)
Dan Eustace
University of
Connecticut
Joanne Kamens
Addgene
Four different workshops, led by recognized scientific
career experts Professor Dan Eustace, University of
Connecticut, and Joanne Kamens, Addgene, are offered
to hone your credentials, polish your skills and to help
you stand out in today’s job market. These workshops are
free-of-charge to SLAS2015 attendees, and available on a
first-come, first-served basis.
This interactive workshop invites audience members to
play active roles participating in, providing feedback for
and perhaps coaching how to manage different kinds of
interview scenarios.
How to Choose Your Next Lab
Tuesday, February 10, 12:30 - 1:30 pm (bring a box lunch)
This presentation gives you practical tips on what to look
for and how to find it when choosing a new lab for your
research. A must-hear for all young scientists.
33
TRANSFORM YOUR
APPRECIATION OF
NEW TECHNOLOGIES
EXHIBITOR TUTORIALS
Learn About the Science Behind the Technology
As of press time, the following companies are presenting
tutorials that offer an in-depth look at topics of ongoing
practical interest. Visit SLAS2015.org for the latest list of
participating companies and schedule of tutorials.
THE EXHIBITION
monday, february ninth
The exhibition at SLAS2015 features more than 300
leading scientific technology providers showcasing the
latest products and services. This venue is a great way
to see the latest technologies firsthand, ask questions of
expert developers and product managers, and compare
offerings that best fit the needs and business objectives of
your laboratory. The SLAS2015 Exhibition offers a friendly,
welcoming environment where a spirit of collaboration
precedes sales pitches. You will leave the SLAS2015
Exhibition better prepared to recommend new products,
services and technologies to take your organization to the
next level.
Agilent Technologies
ARTEL
Brooks Automation
Cisbio Bioassays
DiscoveRx
Festo
Genedata
tuesday, february tenth
Exhibition Hours
Sunday, February 8 Monday, February 9 Tuesday, February 10 IntelliCyt
Labcyte
MaxCyte
Promega
Thermo Scientific
TTP Labtech
4:30 - 7 pm
10 am - 6:30 pm
9:30 am - 6 pm
SLAS2015 Exhibit Only passes are available free-of-charge.
Register for yours at SLAS2015.org.
Agilent Technologies
ARTEL
BioTek Instruments
Brooks Automation
Cellular Dynamics
International
Cisbio Bioassays
Corning
CYTOO
Essen BioScience
The SLAS2015 Exhibition includes:
• Exhibitor-led tutorials that provide technical education by
exhibiting companies
• Innovation AveNEW, a dedicated area of the floor that hosts
a select group of emerging companies offering impressive
new technologies
• The SLAS New Product Award (NPA) designation that
recognizes up to three new-and-notable products being
showcased in the exhibition
• The SLAS Member Center, where you can relax with other
attendees, meet SLAS leaders and professional team
members, participate in SLAS Journal activities, and
sign-up for career services offered at SLAS2015
34
Festo
Genedata
Labcyte
Nanion Technologies
PerkinElmer
Promega
Roche Diagnostics
Tecan
TTP Labtech
EXHIBITOR LISTING
For additional information on participating companies and to access the exhibition map, View Here
4titude Ltd
Accel Biotech, Inc.
ACEA Biosciences, Inc.
Advanced Analytical
Technologies, Inc.
Cellular Dynamics
International
Cetoni GmbH
ChemBridge Corporation
Chemglass Life Sciences
Agilent Technologies Inc.
Chemspeed Technologies AG
AllMotion
Chieftek Precision Co., Ltd.
Alpaqua Engineering LLC
Cisbio US, Inc.
AMRI
Cognex Corporation
amsbio LLC
Collaborative Drug Discovery
Analytical Sales and
Services, Inc.
Computype, Inc.
Greiner Bio-One
microfluidic ChipShop GmbH
Grenova LLC
Micronic America
Hamamatsu Corporation
Micronit Microfluidics BV
Hamilton Company
Microsonic Systems Inc.
Helix Linear Technologies
Miltenyi Biotec GmbH
Hettich Instruments
MiniFab
HighRes Biosolutions, Inc.
Minitubes
HIWIN Corporation
MK Fluidic Systems
HNP Mikrosysteme GmbH
Moeller Medical
Horizon Discovery Ltd
Molecular Devices, Inc.
Hudson Robotics, Inc.
Multispan, Inc.
IDBS
Nanion Technologies
Analyticon Discovery LLC
Confluence Discovery
Technologies
Andrew Alliance S.A
Core Informatics
IDEA Bio-Medical Ltd
NanoScreen, LLC
Angelantoni Life Science SRL
Corning Incorporated
IDEX Health & Science
NanoTemper Technologies, Inc.
Anton Paar GmbH/USA
Cosmo Biosciences Inc.
Igus, Inc.
Applied BioPhysics, Inc.
Covaris, Inc.
IKO International, Inc.
New England Small Tube
Corporation
Apricot Designs
Creoptix AG
ILS
Arc-Tronics
CSEM SA
ImmunoSite Technologies
Art Robbins Instruments
CyBio US Inc.
infoteam Software AG
ARTEL
Cyprotex
INHECO GmbH
Astech Projects Ltd.
DDNews
InSphero AG
Aurora Biomed, Inc.
De Novo Software
INTEGRA Biosciences
Axion Biosystems, Inc.
DiscoveRx Corporation
IntelliCyt Corporation
Axxam SpA
Douglas Scientific
IonField Systems LLC
Beckman Coulter, Inc.
Drug Discovery World
J-Kem Scientific
Bigneat Ltd
Dynamic Devices
J.G. Finneran Associates, Inc.
BINDER, Inc.
E&K Scientific Products Inc.
JoVE
BioAscent Discovery Ltd
Elmo Motion Control, Inc.
JSR Life Sciences
Biodirect Inc.
emp Biotech
Kawator
BioDot, Inc.
Eppendorf
KBiosystems Ltd
BioFocus
EPSON Robots
KMC Systems, Inc.
BioIT Solutions, Inc.
Essen BioScience
KNF Neuberger Inc.
BioMedTech Laboratories, Inc.
Evotec (UK) Ltd
Lab Services B.V.
BioMicroLab, Inc.
Excel Scientific, Inc.
Labcon
BioNex Solutions, Inc.
Exquiron Biotech AG
Labcyte, Inc.
BioSero, LLC
Festo Corporation
LabSmith, Inc.
BioTek Instruments, Inc.
FluidX
LABVANTAGE Solutions, Inc.
Biotix, Inc.
Fluotics, Ltd
LabWare, Inc.
BlueCatBio
Formulatrix, Inc.
Lathrop Engineering Inc.
BMG Labtech, Inc.
Freeslate, Inc.
LEAP Technologies
BPS Bioscience Inc.
Frontier Scientific Services
The Lee Company
Brady Corporation
GenCell Biosystems Ltd
LiCONiC
BrandTech Scientific, Inc.
Genedata, Inc.
Lin Engineering, Inc.
Brookline Scientific Ltd
Genetic Engineering &
Biotechnology News
LVL Technologies GmbH
& CoKG
Gilson, Inc.
MaxCyte, Inc.
Schaeffler Group USA
GNF Systems
Maxon Precision Motors, Inc.
Schneider Electric Motion USA
MeCour Temperature Control
SCIENION AG
Brooks Automation
BSSN Software
Burkert Fluid Control Systems
35
Scientific Device
Laboratory, Inc.
Scigilian Software, Inc.
Scinomix, Inc.
Seahorse Bioscience
SelectScience
Seyonic SA
Sias AG
Sigma-Aldrich
SiLA Consortium
SMC Corporation of America
Solid State Cooling Systems
Sophion Bioscience A/S
Sparton
Specs
Spectial Instruments
Nippon Pulse America, Inc.
SPEX SamplePrep LLC
Nova Biostorage Plus, LLC
STACS DNA, Inc.
Omega Bio-Tek, Inc.
STRATEC Biomedical AG
Omni International, Inc.
TAP Biosystems
Opticon, Inc.
Tecan
Oriental Motor USA Corp.
Technology Networks Ltd
Panasonic Healthcare
Tek-Matic, Inc.
Panasonic Industrial Devices
Thermo Scientific
Parker
Thorlabs
Peak Analysis and Automation
Titian Software
PerkinElmer
TOMTEC
PHENIX Research Products
Torrey Pines Scientific, Inc.
Plastic Design Corporation
TriContinent
Precise Automation
Trinean
Precision Bioservices
TTP LabTech
Prior Scientific, Inc.
TubeWriter
Pro-Dex OMS
TWD TradeWinds, Inc.
Promega Corporation
UNIConnect
ProQinase GmbH
Union Biometrica, Inc.
PSS (Precision System Science)
USA Scientific, Inc.
QIAGEN Sciences, Inc.
V&P Scientific, Inc.
Quantifoil Instruments GmbH
VICI Valco Instruments
Reaction Biology Corp
Wako Automation
Renishaw, Inc.
Weidmann Plastics
Technology AG
Retisoft, Inc.
Roche
RURO, Inc.
SAMDI Tech, Inc.
Sarstedt, Inc.
Wyatt Technology Corporation
Xavo Systems AG
Zinsser Analytic
REGISTRATION AND HOTEL ACCOMMODATIONS
Registration
SLAS2015 is pleased to offer significant registration
discounts to advance registrants, for groups of registrants
from the same industry organization, for professionals
from academic institutions and government agencies, and
for students. Deepest early-bird discounts are available
for SLAS members who register by October 31, 2014.
(Become an SLAS member to take advantage of these
discounts, plus receive year-round benefits through the
end of 2015 for just one year’s dues.) Advance discounts
are available through January 9, 2015.
Group discounts are offered for organizations that send
at least five (5) employees who register in advance and
at the same time. Student registrants are not eligible for
SLAS2015 Group Discounts. See terms and conditions for
Group Registration discounts at SLAS2015.org.
Hotel Accommodations
SLAS2015 takes place at the Walter E. Washington
Convention Center, 801 Mt Vernon Place NW, Washington,
DC 20001. SLAS2015 has negotiated discounted rates
for conference attendees at two of Washington’s premier
hotels, the Marriott Marquis Washington, DC [SLAS2015
Headquarters, located closest to the Walter E. Washington
Convention Center and connected to the convention
center via an indoor underground walkway] and the
Renaissance Washington, DC, Downtown.
Marriott Marquis Washington, DC
(Headquarters Hotel)
901 Massachusetts Avenue NW, Washington, DC, 20001
Telephone Reservations: +1.800.393.2505
(reference SLAS2015 when calling)
To reserve your room online using official SLAS2015
channels, visit the Housing and Travel page of
SLAS2015.org. The deadline for booking hotel
accommodations at the negotiated SLAS2015 rate is
January 7, 2015.
The Benefits of Using Official
SLAS2015 Reservation Systems
and Hotels
SLAS2015 has negotiated special rates and benefits
for conference attendees at two of Washington, DC’s
premier hotels, including the brand new Marriott
Marquis Washington, DC, and the Renaissance
Washington, DC Downtown.
Not only are these hotels conveniently located adjacent
to the convention center, but SLAS2015 attendees
benefit in several other ways:
• Significant discounts off standard guest room rates
• Complimentary guest room Internet service
(value of up to $12.95 + tax per night)
• Flexible booking policies
• Simplified ability to make reservation changes, if required
By staying in the SLAS block of guest rooms, SLAS is able to
contract premier facilities such as the Walter E. Washington
Convention Center. Additionally, you are helping the Society
meet its contractual obligations to the hotels, avoid penalties
and help to underwrite the cost of convention center rental,
therefore keeping conference registration fees as affordable
as possible. Your support of booking your room within the
SLAS2015 guest room block is greatly appreciated. For
additional information and to reserve a room through
official SLAS reservation channels, View Here.
Renaissance Washington, DC Downtown
999 Ninth Street NW, Washington, DC, 20001
Telephone Reservations: +1.800.393.2505
(reference SLAS2015 when calling)
36
TRAVEL INFORMATION
Air Travel Information
Amtrak Information
You may book your air travel directly with SLAS2015’s
official travel agent, National Travel at:
Amtrak offers SLAS2015 participants a 10% discount
on fares to/from Washington, DC, over the travel dates
of February 4 - 14, 2015. To book your reservation,
call Amtrak at +1.800.872.7245 and be sure to refer
to Convention Fare Code X28T-908 when making your
reservation to ensure the 10% discount is applied.
vipservices@nationaltravel.com;
+1.800.557.0842 (toll free);
+1.304.357.0808 (international)
There are three international airports serving the
Washington, DC, area:
• Reagan National Airport (DCA)
• Dulles International Airport (IAD)
• Baltimore-Washington International Thurgood Marshall
Airport (BWI)
Airport Transportation
Information
From Reagan National Airport (DCA)
Reagan National Airport is the closest airport to the
convention center and official SLAS2015 hotels and is also
the only airport with Metro access.
Metrorail Stop: Yellow line to Mt Vernon stop
Taxi Cab: Approximately 20 min (w/o traffic); approximately
$45 one way
Union Station in Washington, DC is approximately 1.3 miles
from the Walter E. Washington Convention Center and
official hotels.
Metrorail Stop: Red line toward Shady Grove/Grosvenor;
Change trains at Gallery Place then Yellow line to
Mt Vernon stop
Taxi Cab: Approximately 5 min (w/o traffic); approximately
$8 one-way
Rental Car Information
National Travel can also assist you in adding a rental car
to your existing reservation or in booking a rental car as a
stand-alone reservation:
vipservices@nationaltravel.com;
+1.800.557.0842 (toll free);
+1.304.357.0808 (international)
From Baltimore/Washington International Thurgood
Marshall Airport (BWI)
Taxi Cab: Approximately 60 min (w/o traffic); approximately
$90 one-way
From Dulles International Airport (IAD)
Taxi Cab: Approximately 45 min (w/o traffic); approximately
$64 one-way
37
SLAS BOARD OF DIRECTORS AND
CONFERENCE COMMITTEES
SLAS2015 Scientific Program
Planning Committee
SLAS Scientific Program
Advisory Committee
SLAS2015
Conference
Chairs
Jim Inglese
National Institutes
of Health (NIH)
Elliot Hui
University of
California, Irvine
Assay Development
and Screening Track
Biomarker Discovery
and Applications Track
Anton Simeonov, Chair
National Institutes of Health
(NIH)
Daniel Chelsky, Chair
Caprion Proteomics
J. Fraser Glickman,
Associate Chair
Rockefeller University
Automation and
High-Throughput
Technologies Track
Alex Godfrey, Chair
Eli Lilly and Company
Timothy Spicer,
Associate Chair
Scripps Research Institute
Bioanalytical
Techniques Track
Peter Grandsard, Chair
Amgen
Wilson Shou,
Associate Chair
Bristol-Myers Squibb
Jonathan O’Connell, Chair
Forma Therapeutics
David Eddington
University of Illinois at Chicago
Doug Auld
Novartis
Elliot Hui
University of California, Irvine
Josh Bittker
Broad Institute
Jim Inglese
National Institutes
of Health (NIH)
Michele Cleary
Merck
Dino DiCarlo
University of California,
Los Angeles
Aaron Wheeler
University of Toronto
Short Course and
SIG Coordinators
David Hirschberg,
Associate Chair
Columbia University
Sue Holland-Crimmin, Chair
GlaxoSmithKline
Drug Target
Strategies Track
Burkhard Schaefer
BSSN Software
Andrew Napper
Martin Valler
Nemours Center for Childhood Boehringer Ingelheim
Cancer Research
Pharma GmbH & Co. KG
Marcie Glicksman, Chair
Harvard NeuroDiscovery
Michelle Arkin,
Associate Chair
University of California,
San Francisco
SLAS Board of Directors
Daniel G. Sipes,
2014-15 SLAS President
Genomics Institute of the
Novartis Research Foundation
Informatics Track
Dana Vanderwall, Chair
Bristol-Myers Squibb
Alastair Binnie
Bristol Myers-Squibb
Ellen Berg, Associate Chair
Bioseek
Joshua Bittker
Broad Institute
Micro/Nano
Technologies Track
Richard Eglen
Corning Life Sciences
Sumita Pennathur, Chair
University of California,
Santa Barbara
Richard Ellson
Labcyte
Daniel Huh, Associate Chair
University of Pennsylvania
38
Frank Fan
Promega
Dean Ho
University of California,
Los Angeles
Robyn Rourick
Genentech
Mike Snowden
AstraZeneca
PENNATHUR
The SLAS Electronic Laboratory Neighborhood ...
... is a place for laboratory science and technology professionals to learn more about like-minded
colleagues and their personal and professional achievements. It brings the SLAS scientific community
to life with real stories by and about real people. From Singapore to Seattle to Stockholm, eager postdocs, seasoned Nobel Laureates, and those who work diligently at benchtops and in classrooms
share their ideas, hopes and fears in this friendly and informative international neighborhood.
Meet Your Neighbors:
•
Lynn Rasmussen: Labware Leachables
•
Josh Kangas: Building an Engine for a Start-up Business
•
John Joslin: Flow Cytometry Powers HTS Advances
•
Lorenz Mayr: Listen to the Data
•
Eric Pei-Yu Chiou and Hideaki Tsutsui: JALA Guest Editors
•
Cynthia Yin: Greeting a Bright Future in Science
•
Roger Bosse and Mathieu Arcand: Drug Repurposing
•
Small Molecule Profiling: Dealing with the Data
Sharing experience and perspective on science-related topics, this open access membership e-zine is
an official publication of the Society for Laboratory Automation and Screening (SLAS). Visit eln.slas.org.
If you have story suggestions,
please e-mail eln@slas.org.
39
FU
eln.slas.org
ARCAND
BRIDEAU
Welcome to
the Neighborhood!
Exclusive Premier Sponsor:
SLAS gratefully thanks Hamilton
for underwriting many of this year’s
conference activities.
Diamond Sponsors:
Platinum Sponsors:
Gold Sponsors:
Silver Sponsor:
TM
To reserve your sponsorship or for more information please contact:
Mary Michalik, Sponsorship Manager; mmichalik@SLAS.org; +1.312.265.9650
40
SLAS2015 MEDIA PARTNERS
41
,
SHORT COURSES: february / seven – eight
CONFERENCE:
february / nine – eleven
EXHIBITION:
february / eight – ten
CONFERENCE AND SHORT COURSE REGISTRATION FORM
Register online at SLAS2015.org or complete this form. A $50 cancellation fee will be charged on cancellations received on or before
December 19, 2014. No refunds will be given on cancellations received after December 19, 2014.
First Name
Last Name
Job Title/Year Hired
Company Name
q Work q Home
Preferred Mailing Address
Street Address
City
State/Province
Telephone
Fax
Zip/Postal Code
Country
Email
q Check this box if you do not wish to be included in promotional mailings from SLAS2015 Exhibitors.
Your Organization’s Primary Sector: (check one only)
q Academia/University
q Agriculture Sciences
q Chemical Industry
q Clinical Diagnostics
q Consultancy
q Consumer Products
q Contract Service Provider
q Energy/Fuel
q Food Science
q Government
q Hospital/Clinic/Healthcare
q Medical/Diagnostic Devices
q Non-profit
q Pharmaceutical/Biopharmaceutical/
Therapeutics
q Technology/Instruments Provider
q None of the above
q Not involved in purchasing decisions
q Specify products/releases
Indicate Role in Purchasing Process: (check one only)
q Approver/Final Decision Maker
q Influencer
q None of the above
Indicate Your Primary Job Function: (check one only)
q Academic Administration
Dean, Dept. Head)
q Academic Faculty/Researcher
(Professor, Instructor, PI)
q Academic Post-Doctoral
q Academic Graduate Student
q Academic Undergraduate
q Administrative
q Consultant
q Legal
q Licensing/Tech Transfer
q Management (Director, Manager,
Department Head)
q Media
q Purchasing
q Retired
q Sales/Marketing/Business
Development
q Senior Management (CEO, VP)
q Scientist/Researcher/Engineer/
Technician
q None of the above
Indicate Your Primary Interest Area: (check one only)
q Analytical Chemistry/Quantitative
Biology
q Basic Research
q Diagnostics
q Drug Development
q Drug Discovery
q Genomics
q Healthcare
q Informatics/Bioinformatics/
Computational Science
q Laboratory Instrumentation/
Technology
q Medical Devices
q Micro/Nano Technology
q Synthetic Chemistry
q Tech Transfer
Conference Track in Which You Are Most Interested: (check one only)
q Assay Development and Screening
q Automation and High-Throughput
Technologies
q Bioanalytical Techniques
q Drug Target Strategies
q Informatics
q Micro/Nano Technologies
q Biomarker Discovery and Applications
Levels of Membership: (For additional membership information visit: www.slas.org/membership)
Individual
q
Biomolecular Sciences Section (BSS) - $120
q
Laboratory Automation Section (LAS) - $120
q
Combined Section - $200
Early Career Professionals
q
Biomolecular Sciences Section (BSS) - $60
q
Laboratory Automation Section (LAS) - $60
q
Combined Section - $100
Emerging Economies
q
Biomolecular Sciences Section (BSS) - $60
q
Laboratory Automation Section (LAS) - $60
q
Combined Section - $100
Retired
q
Biomolecular Sciences Section (BSS) - $60
q
Laboratory Automation Section (LAS) - $60
q
Combined Section - $100
Student
q
Biomolecular Sciences Section (BSS) - $25
q
Laboratory Automation Section (LAS) - $25
q
Combined Section - $50
continued on next page.
CONFERENCE AND SHORT COURSE REGISTRATION FORM CONT.
Conference Registration
Between November 1, 2014
and January 9, 2015
On or Before October 31, 2014
(Registration Fees)
After January 9, 2015
SLAS Member
SLAS Non-Member
SLAS Member
SLAS Non-Member
SLAS Member
SLAS Non-Member
q Industry Participant
$810
$1,050
$900
$1,050
$1,100
$1,250
q Academic/Government Participant
$540
$750
$600
$750
$700
$850
q Student Participant
$75
$100
$75
$100
$75
$100
FREE
FREE
FREE
FREE
FREE
FREE
q Exhibition Only Participant
(Registration is required. Those without badges
will not be allowed access to the Exhibition.)
Short Courses
Check box of selected course. (Short Course only registration is available and includes entrance into the Exhibition.)
IMPORTANT NOTE: Courses below listed as “Laptop Required” require registrants to bring their own computer. Internet and charging stations are provided free of charge
in each course room. Software specifics are included at www.slas2015.org.
Course Hours
Industry
Member
Industry
Non-Member
Academic/
Government
Member
Academic/
Government
Non-Member
Student
q Establishing Cell-Based Assays for Screening
8:30 am - 4:30 pm
$650
$750
$400
$500
$75
q Lab-on-a-Chip: From Technology to Bioanalysis
on Chip (NEW!)
8:30 am - 4:30 pm
$650
$750
$400
$500
$75
q Liquid Handling Essentials (Hands On) (NEW!)
8:30 am - 4:30 pm
$850
$950
$550
$650
N/A
q 3D Cell-Based Assays for Drug De-Risking
8:30 am - 4:30 pm
$650
$750
$400
$500
$75
q Cross Functional Project Management for
Technical Professional (NEW!)
8:30 am - 4:30 pm
$650
$750
$400
$500
$75
q Data Management in the Age of Big Data, Mobile,
and the Cloud (NEW!)
8:30 am - 4:30 pm
$650
$750
$400
$500
$75
q Digital Image Processing and Analysis for the
Laboratory Scientist: Theory and Application
(Laptop Required) (NEW!)
8:30 am - 4:30 pm
$650
$750
$400
$500
$75
q High Content Screening: Instrumentation, Assay
Development, Screening, Image and Data Analysis
8:30 am - 4:30 pm
$650
$750
$400
$500
$75
q Introduction of Quantitative Treatment of Biological
Assays in the Bioanalytical Laboratory (NEW!)
8:30 am - 4:30 pm
$650
$750
$400
$500
$75
q Introduction to Laboratory Automation
8:30 am - 4:30 pm
$650
$750
$400
$500
$75
q Introduction to the Derivation and Maintenance of
Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells
8:30 am - 4:30 pm
$650
$750
$400
$500
$75
q Lab-on-a-Chip: Biomedical Case Studies (NEW!)
8:30 am - 4:30 pm
$650
$750
$400
$500
$75
q Label-Free/Biophysical Methods for Screening
8:30 am - 4:30 pm
$650
$750
$400
$500
$75
q Next Generation Sequencing Technology
Fundamentals and Applications
8:30 am - 4:30 pm
$650
$750
$400
$500
$75
q Sample Management: Best Practice, Trends
and Challenges
8:30 am - 4:30 pm
$650
$750
$400
$500
$75
COURSE TITLE
ONE DAY COURSE: DATE: Saturday, February 7, 2015
ONE DAY COURSE: DATE: Sunday, February 8, 2015
TWO DAY COURSE: DATE: Saturday, February 7 & Sunday, February 8, 2015
q Getting Started with Excel & VBA (Laptop Required)
8:30 am - 4:30 pm
$1,300
$1,500
$800
$1,000
$150
q Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics in
Drug Discovery
8:30 am - 4:30 pm
$1,300
$1,500
$800
$1,000
$150
Questions? +1.866.878.0747 (toll free in US Only) or +1.708.486.0747 • Send to: SLAS2015 Registration, P.O. Box 6271, Broadview, IL 60155-6271 or +1.708.344.4444 [fax]
CONFERENCE PAYMENT:
Enter conference registration amount $________ Enter short course amount $________ Enter membership amount $________ Total amount $________ Please include payment for the total amount.
q Check enclosed (U.S. funds, payable through U.S. bank). Please make checks payable to SLAS2015.
q Credit Card:
MasterCard, Visa, American Express, Discover number
Exp. Date
Authorized Signature
Name as it Appears on Card
Terms and Conditions: By signing this SLAS2015 registration form, I “the conferee” acknowledge and agree to the terms and conditions as posted on the SLAS2015 website (SLAS2015.org).
Signature
Should you require special assistance due to a medical disability, please contact SLAS Headquarters at +1.877.990.SLAS (7527)