Book of Abstracts - Quantum Optics VII - Universidad de Buenos Aires

O
Q
Quantum
7
Optics VII
Book of Abstracts
27-31 October 2014
Mar del Plata - ARGENTINA
C ONTENTS
A BOUT THE L ATIN A MERICAN C ONFERENCES IN Q UANTUM O PTICS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . iii
O RGANIZERS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . iv
S PONSORS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . v
C ONFERENCE S CHEDULE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . vi
C ONFERENCE P ROGRAM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
L IST OF TALKS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
P OSTER C ONTRIBUTIONS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29
L IST OF PARTICIPANTS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37
Quantum Optics VII, 27-31 October 2014, Mar del Plata, ARGENTINA
A BOUT THE L ATIN A MERICAN C ONFERENCES
IN Q UANTUM O PTICS
The "Quantum Optics" conferences started in 2000. That year, "Quantum
Optics I" was organized by Miguel Orszag in Santiago de Chile. This was
a very timely event that was followed by many others. These conferences
combine a rather strong community of researchers working in the region and
attracted a large number of participants working in other parts of the world.
The "Quantum Optics" series includes: "Quantum Optics II" (organized in 2004 in Cozumel, Mexico), "Quantum Optics III" (organized in 2006 in Pucon, Chile), "Quantum Optics IV" (organized in
2008 in Jurere, Brazil), "Quantum Optics V" (organized in 2010 in Cozumel, Mexico) and "Quantum
Optics VI" (organized in 2012 in Piriapolis, Uruguay). "Quantum Optics VII" will be organized in
2014 in Mar del Plata (Argentina).
The "Quantum Optics" conferences have provided a very good forum that enables discussing recent
developments in Quantum Optics and Quantum Information, including topics such as: Non-Linear
Optics, Atom Optics, Laser cooling, Atom and Ion trapping, Bose-Einstein Condensation, Quantum
Interference, Entanglement, Atom Laser, Quantum Information Processing, etc.
iii
Quantum Optics VII, 27-31 October 2014, Mar del Plata, ARGENTINA
O RGANIZERS
Scientific Commitee
Luiz Davidovich (UFRJ)
Serge Haroche (Collège de France)
H. Jeff Kimble (CALTECH)
Luis Orozco (UMD, JQI)
Miguel Orszag (PUC,Chile)
Wolfgang Schleich (UULM)
Organizing Commitee
Arturo Lezama (Uruguay)
Daniel Felinto (Brazil)
Carlos H. Monken (Brazil)
Paulo Nussensveig (Brazil)
Sebastião de Pádua (Brazil)
Antonio Zelaquett Khoury (Brazil)
Carlos Saavedra (Chile)
Stephen Walborn (Brazil)
Local Commitee
Ignacio García-Mata
Miguel Larotonda
Juan Pablo Paz
Augusto Roncaglia
iv
Quantum Optics VII, 27-31 October 2014, Mar del Plata, ARGENTINA
S PONSORS
Sponsoring Institutions and Companies
v
Quantum Optics VII, 27-31 October 2014, Mar del Plata, ARGENTINA
P ROGRAM
Monday 27
Tuesday 28
Wednesday 29
Friday 31
Thursday 30
8:30
Plenio
9:00
9:00
Wisniacki
9:15
9:20
MMJMSánchez
Acín
Pfister
JiménezbFarías
9:40
Osenda
10:00
Khoury
10:00
10:00
Delgado
White
10:20
BarretotLemos
COFFEEtBREAK
10:35
10:45
11:00
COFFEEtBREAK
11:00
Anders
Schütz
11:20
Ferraro
Lester
10:55
Sangouardt
Bergou
9:40
Fanchini
10:00
TerratCunha
10:20
Petruccionet
Cabello
9:00
Toscano
SchmidtbKaler
Spehner
Pattanayak
9:45
Cormick
Carvalho
COFFEEtBREAK
10:35
Oriá
Fonseca
Pádua
10:30
10:50
11:05
11:15
França
Santos
PascualbWinter
12:00
9:20
Schmidt
Leuchs
11:40
Klimov
Maniscalco
10:55
Solano
11:40
12:00
VillasbBoas
9:00
HMPastawski
COFFEEtBREAK
Escher
11:25
Calarco
Steinberg
12:00
12:10
Zoller
12:30
LUNCH
LUNCH
13:00
12:55
LUNCH
LUNCH
14:00
14:00
14:00
Lezama
Mitchell
14:15
Kimble
U-Ren
FMPastawski
14:45
15:00
14:45
Eschner
Walborn
15:00
Zeilinger
Monroe
15:30
Aolita
Wallentowitz
15:50
16:00
Galvao
Hradil
16:10
15:30
15:45
Furusawa
[email protected]
COFFEEtBREAK
16:15
16:30
OPENING
17:00
16:35
17:00
Valencia
Davidovich
McCutcheon
17:15
Nussenzveig
18:00
17:45
POSTER
SESSION
k
POSTER
SESSION
J
COFFEEtBREAK
18:00
18:00
Orszag
19:00
[email protected]
Lett
SanchezbSoto
16:55
Eisert
18:45
Blatt
19:30
COCKTAIL
Plenarytandtparalleltsessionstatt
SalóntPeraltatRamostWleveltkn
Paralleltsessionstatt
SalóntRealtWleveltbkn
21:00
PostertsessionstktutJtatt
SalóntJuantdetGaraytWleveltkn
vi
CONFERENCEtDINNER
Quantum Optics VII, 27-31 October 2014, Mar del Plata, ARGENTINA
DAY- BY-DAY C ONFERENCE P ROGRAM
Monday
Conference Opening - 16:30 hs
Plenary Talk 1 - 17:00 hs
9
Luiz Davidovich
Towards the Ultimate Precision Limit in Parameter Estimation: Recent Results in Quantum Metrology
Coffee Break - 17:45 hs
Plenary Session 2 - 18:00 hs
9
Miguel Orszag
Propagation, distribution and criticality of correlations in a cavity QED network
9
Rainer Blatt
Quantum Information Science with Trapped Ca+ Ions
Welcome Cocktail - 19:30 hs
Tuesday
Plenary Session 3 - 8:30 hs
9
Martin Plenio
Diamond Quantum Devices for Biology and Simulation
10
Antonio Acín
Setups for device-independent quantum key distribution
10
Andrew White
Physics above and below the Bell horizon
Coffee Break - 10:45 hs
1
Quantum Optics VII, 27-31 October 2014, Mar del Plata, ARGENTINA
Semi-Plenary Session 1A - 11:00 hs (Salón Peralta Ramos)
10
Janet Anders
Nanoscale temperature measurements using non-equilibrium Brownian dynamics of a levitated nanosphere
10
Alessandro Ferraro
Coherent extraction and entanglement engineering of confined continuous-variable systems
11
Andrei Klimov
Equilibration and thermalization in the space of symmetric measurements
Semi-Plenary Session 1B - 11:00 hs (Salón Real)
11
Stefan Schütz
Dynamics of self-organization of atoms in cavities
11
Pablo Solano
Advances on a hybrid quantum system of neutral atoms coupled to a superconducting circuit: the atomic
and optical side
12
Florencia Pascual-Winter
Optical clock transition in a rare-earth-ion-doped crystal: coherence lifetime extension for quantum storage applications
Lunch - 12:00 hs
Plenary Session 4A - 14:00 hs (Salón Peralta Ramos)
12
Arturo Lezama
Squeezing and entanglement using atomic vapor
12
Jürgen Eschner
High-fidelity heralded single-photon to single-atom quantum state transfer
Plenary Session 4B - 14:00 hs (Salón Real)
13
Morgan Mitchell
Experiments to observe the entangled particles inside squeezed states
13
Stephen Walborn
Ancilla-assisted measurement of photonic spatial correlations and entanglement
Semi-Plenary Session 2A - 15:30 hs (Salón Peralta Ramos)
13
Leandro Aolita
Reliable quantum certification for photonic quantum technologies
13
Ernesto Galvão
Boson Sampling in photonic chips
2
Quantum Optics VII, 27-31 October 2014, Mar del Plata, ARGENTINA
Semi-Plenary Session 2B - 15:30 hs (Salón Real)
14
Sascha Wallentowitz
Quantum-polarization tomography for arbitrary photon statistics
14
Zdenek Hradil
Quantum tomography in phase space
Coffee Break - 16:10 hs
Semi-Plenary Session 3A - 16:35 hs (Salón Peralta Ramos)
14
Luis Sánchez-Soto
The quest for the kings of quantumness
14
Alejandra Valencia
Experimental Quantum Optics: a testbed for quantum measurement and quantum decoherence
Semi-Plenary Session 3B - 16:35 hs (Salón Real)
15
Paul Lett
Transmission of Quantum Information through Dispersive Media
15
Dara McCutcheon
Indistinguishable photons from a semiconductor quantum dot in an adiabatic micro pillar cavity; competing roles of timing-jitter and pure-dephasing
Plenary Session 5 - 17:15 hs
15
Paulo Nussenzveig
Quantum fluctuations of spectral modes of light: resonator detection and characterization of Gaussian states
16
Jens Eisert
Dynamical analogue quantum simulators
Wednesday
Semi-Plenary Session 4A - 9:00 hs (Salón Peralta Ramos)
16
Diego Wisniacki
Quantum control using fast transitions
16
María José Sanchez
Quantum control of driven artificial atoms
16
Omar Osenda
Quantum control of a model qubit based on quantum dots
3
Quantum Optics VII, 27-31 October 2014, Mar del Plata, ARGENTINA
17
Aldo Delgado
Born rule from probability theory
Semi-Plenary Session 4B - 9:00 hs (Salón Real)
17
Olivier Pfister
Large-scale hypercubic-lattice cluster-state entanglement in the quantum optical frequency comb
17
Osvaldo Jiménez Farías
Resilience of hybrid optical angular momentum qubits to turbulence
17
Antonio Khoury
Fractional topological phases for entangled qudits
17
Gabriela Barreto Lemos
Experimental insights in quantum imaging with undetected photons
Coffee Break - 10:20 hs
Semi-Plenary Talk 5A - 10:35 hs (Salón Peralta Ramos)
18
Celso Villas-Boas
Revealing quantum aspects of a strong cavity field
Semi-Plenary Talk 5B - 10:35 hs (Salón Real)
18
Brian Lester
Two-particle quantum interference in tunnel-coupled optical tweezers
Plenary Session 6A - 10:55 hs (Salón Peralta Ramos)
19
Gerd Leuchs
Inverse spontaneous emission of an atom in free space – an example of time reversal symmetry in optics
19
Francesco Petruccione
Open Quantum Walks: dynamics, thermodynamics and transport
Plenary Session 6B - 10:55 hs (Salón Real)
19
Nicolas Sangouard
Macroscopic Entanglement
20
Adán Cabello
A principle for quantum correlations
Lunch - 12:30 hs
4
Quantum Optics VII, 27-31 October 2014, Mar del Plata, ARGENTINA
Plenary Talk 7A - 14:15 hs (Salón Peralta Ramos)
20
Alfred U’Ren
Exploitation of transverse structure in non-classical light sources
Plenary Talk 7B - 14:15 hs (Salón Real)
20
Fernando Pastawski
Classification of protected gates for subsystem codes
Plenary Talk 8 - 15:00 hs
20
Christopher Monroe
Quantum Networking with with Trapped Ions
Poster Session 1 - 15:45 hs (discussion of odd-numbered posters)
Thursday
Semi-Plenary Session 6A - 9:00 hs (Salón Peralta Ramos)
21
Sabrina Maniscalco
10 things you always wanted to know about non-Markovian open quantum systems.
21
Janos Bergou
Sequential quantum measurements
21
Felipe Fanchini
Non-Markovianity through accessible information
22
Marcelo Terra Cunha
Multigraph approach to quantum non-locality and contextuality
Semi-Plenary Session 6B - 9:00 hs (Salón Real)
22
Fabricio Toscano
Systematic Construction of Genuine Multipartite Entanglement Criteria using Uncertainty Relations
22
Dominique Spehner
Geometric quantum discords
23
Arjendu Pattanayak
Surprises in the Quantum-Classical Connection for Chaotic Systems
23
Andre Carvalho
Ignorance is bliss: General and robust cancellation of decoherence via no-knowledge quantum feedback
5
Quantum Optics VII, 27-31 October 2014, Mar del Plata, ARGENTINA
Coffee Break - 10:20 hs
Semi-Plenary Session 7A - 10:35 hs (Salón Peralta Ramos)
23
Karen Fonseca
Which-state information for non-orthogonal states
23
Rebecca Schmidt
Towards quantum cybernetics
Semi-Plenary Session 7B - 10:35 hs (Salón Real)
23
Marcos Oriá
Statistical properties of photons propagating through resonant vapours
24
Sebastião de Pádua
Quantum Contextuality in a Young interference experiment
Plenary Talk 9A - 11:15 hs (Salón Peralta Ramos)
24
Marcelo França Santos
Towards solid state quantum optical devices
Plenary Talk 9B - 11:15 hs (Salón Real)
24
Tommaso Calarco
Steering many-body quantum dynamics
Lunch - 12:00 hs
Plenary Session 10 (P10) - 14:00 hs
24
Jeff Kimble
Strong Atom-Photon Interactions in Nano-Photonic Lattices
25
Anton Zeilinger
Information in photons that are never detected
25
Akira Furusawa
Squeezing and cubic phase gates and the related technologies
Poster Session 2 - 16:15 hs (discussion of even-numbered posters)
Conference Dinner - 21:00 hs
6
Quantum Optics VII, 27-31 October 2014, Mar del Plata, ARGENTINA
Friday
Plenary Session 11 - 9:00 hs
25
Ferdinand Schmidt-Kaler
Ion crystals for quantum computing, simulation and non-equilibrium physics
25
Cecilia Cormick
Two-dimensional spectroscopy for the study of ion Coulomb crystals
Semi-Plenary Talk 8 - 10:30 hs
26
Horacio Pastawski
Decoherent time-dependent transport beyond Landauer-Büttiker: a Quantum Drift alternative to Quantum
Jumps
Coffee Break - 10:50 hs
Semi-Plenary Talk 9 - 11:05 hs
26
Bruno de Moura Escher
Estimating the strength of a Force with noisy two-level quantum systems in the Heisenberg limit
Plenary Session 12 - 11:25 hs
26
Aephraim Steinberg
Two novel applications of entanglement: compressing 3 qubits into 2, and making 1 photon act like 100
27
Peter Zoller
Many-body quantum dynamics and phases of driven two-level atoms coupled via a chiral bath
Lunch - 12:55 hs
7
Quantum Optics VII, 27-31 October 2014, Mar del Plata, ARGENTINA
8
Quantum Optics VII, 27-31 October 2014, Mar del Plata, ARGENTINA
L IST OF TALKS
Towards the Ultimate Precision Limit in Parameter Estimation: Recent Results in
Quantum Metrology
Luiz Davidovich,
Instituto de Física, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro
Quantum Metrology concerns the estimation of parameters, like a phase shift in an interferometer, the magnitude of a weak force, or the time
duration of a dynamical process, taking into account the quantum character of the systems and processes involved. Quantum mechanics brings
in some new features to the process of parameter estimation. The precision of the estimation becomes now intimately related to the possibility of
discriminating two different quantum states of the probe corresponding to two different values of the parameter to be estimated. Also, possible
measurements must abide by the rules of quantum mechanics. At the same time, quantum properties, like squeezing and entanglement, may help to
increase the precision. This talk will review recent results concerning the application of quantum metrology methods to the problem of weak-value
amplification and also to the quantum speed limit in the presence of noise.
Mon 17:00
Propagation, distribution and criticality of correlations in a cavity QED network
Miguel Orszag,
Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile
We study the propagation and distribution of the quantum correlations through two chains of atoms inside cavities joined by optical fibers. We also
investigate the thermal effects on sudden changes and freezing of the quantum and classical correlations of remote qubits in a cavity QED network
with losses
Mon 18:00
Quantum Information Science with Trapped Ca+ Ions
Rainer Blatt,
University of Innsbruck, Institute for Experimental Physics
In this talk, the basic tool box of the Innsbruck quantum information processor based on a string of trapped Ca+ ions will be reviewed. For quantum
information science, the toolbox operations are used to encode one logical qubit in entangled states distributed over seven trapped-ion qubits.
We demonstrate the capability of the code to detect one bit flip, phase flip or a combined error of both, regardless on which of the qubits they
occur. Furthermore, we apply combinations of the entire set of logical single-qubit Clifford gates on the encoded qubit to explore its computational
capabilities. The quantum toolbox is further applied to carry out both analog and digital quantum simulations. The basic simulation procedure will
be presented and its application will be discussed for a variety of spin Hamiltonians. Including a carefully controlled dissipation mechanism, the
toolbox allows for the quantum simulation of open systems. A string of ions is used to implement a quantum system that interacts by means of
quantum gate operations with an additional ancilla ion which in turn is coupled to the environment in a well-controlled way. Thus, entangled states,
such as Bell and GHZ states can be generated by dissipative processes and can be used as part of a quantum simulator. Finally, the quantum toolbox
is applied to investigate the propagation of entanglement in a quantum many-body system represented by long chains of trapped-ion qubits.
Mon 18:45
Diamond Quantum Devices for Biology and Simulation
Martin Plenio,
Institut of Theoretical Physics, Ulm University
In this lecture I will report recent experiment and theory progress on the use of colour centers in diamond for quantum sensing and quantum
simulation and outline connections to the biological sciences.
Tue 8:30
9
Quantum Optics VII, 27-31 October 2014, Mar del Plata, ARGENTINA
Setups for device-independent quantum key distribution
Antonio Acín,
ICFO-The Institute of Photonic Sciences
Device-Independent Quantum Key Distribution is a formalism that supersedes traditional quantum key distribution, as its security does not rely on
any detailed modelling of the internal working of the devices. This strong form of security is possible only using devices producing correlations
that violate a Bell inequality. Such violation is challenging experimentally due to photo-detection inefficiencies and, especially, channel losses. We
describe quantum opticalproposals that allow two distant parties to observe a Bell inequality violation. We then compute the corresponding key
rates and discuss the possible implementation using present technology.
Tue 9:15
Physics above and below the Bell horizon
Andrew White,
University of Queensland
Fifty years ago, John Bell laid down the foundation of the employment of many of us at this conference. His theorem not only made a testable
prediction for quantum mechanics, but also provided a horizon which delineated quantum from post-quantum theories. In this talk I will shine some
light on an old question which Bell’s local-causality framework helped formulate: what is the nature of the wavefunction? We find that if there
is some underlying reality to the wavefunction at all, the wavefunction must itself very likely be real if we want to maintain Bell’s framework. I
will then edge above the Bell horizon with two post-quantum phenomena: an experimental protocol which allows to create stronger-than-quantum
correlations–and thus violate information causality; and a quantum simulation of closed-timelike curves.
Tue 10:00
Nanoscale temperature measurements using non-equilibrium Brownian dynamics
of a levitated nanosphere
Janet Anders,
University of Exeter
Optically trapped nanospheres are used extensively for the investigation of properties and processes at the nanoscale. They are also a leading
candidate in the quest to observe macroscopic quantum superposition states. However, determining the temperature of nanoscale objects when large
temperature differences occur has remained challenging. We introduce a new theoretical model that captures the non-equilibrium situation of heated
particles in the dilute gas regime. This opens the possibility to infer the sphere surface temperature from experimental data of the particle’s motion.
We then report on first experimental temperature measurements using optically levitated nanospheres and discuss the observation of temperature
gradients on the nanoscale.
Tue 11:00
Coherent extraction and entanglement engineering of confined continuous-variable
systems
Alessandro Ferraro,
Queen’s University Belfast (UK)
In the context of infinite-dimensional quantum systems, some novel quantum technologies (including quantum optomechanical systems, ions in
micro-fabricated traps and atomic ensembles) are now reaching a level of maturity that opens up unprecedented opportunities for the processing
of quantum information. A common trait of these systems is the fact that their quantum continuous variables are spatially confined, in contrast
with traditional systems composed of travelling waves. This favours their scalability and therefore the possibility that they could offer to perform
advanced quantum information tasks. However their spatial confinement also raises some issues related with state-manipulation and communication.
First, I will present a general framework to coherently convert confined into travelling continuous variables and vice versa [1]. This scheme can
be used to effectively "open" a high-Q electromagnetic resonator – namely, to release the quantum state initially prepared in it in the form of a
travelling wave. I will discuss two implementations of the latter scheme in the optical domain, based on ensembles of two-level atoms interacting
with cavity fields. Second, I will consider a system composed of a qubit interacting with a quartic confined nonlinear oscillator, showing that even
a modest nonlinearity can enhance and stabilize the quantum entanglement dynamically generated between the qubit and the oscillator [2].
References
[1] T. Tufarelli, A. Ferraro, A. Serafini, S. Bose, M.S. Kim, Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 133605 (2014).
[2] V. Montenegro, A. Ferraro, S. Bose, Phys. Rev. A 90, 013829 (2014).
Tue 11:20
10
Quantum Optics VII, 27-31 October 2014, Mar del Plata, ARGENTINA
Equilibration and thermalization in the space of symmetric measurements
Andrei Klimov,
Universidad de Guadalajara, Mexico
We analyze dynamics of large quantum systems (N-qubit system with N 1) in the space of symmetric measurements. Evolution governed by
Hamiltonians with regular and random spectrum is studied. Asymptotic behavior of random systems is discussed in the frame of the thermodynamic
approach. In particular, equilibration and thermalization in the space of symmetric measurements are discussed.
Tue 11:40
Dynamics of self-organization of atoms in cavities
Stefan Schütz,
Universität des Saarlandes
S. Schütz and G. Morigi
Laser-cooled atoms in optical resonators can self-organize in spatially-ordered structures. Selforganization sets in when the strength of the cooling
laser, which directly pumps the atoms, exceeds a threshold value. Then, the ordered structures are stable and support coherent scattering of the atoms
into the resonator, so that the cavity optical potential is maximized [1]. In turn, the cavity field mediates infinitely long-range interactions between
the atoms, giving rise to novel dynamics. The dynamics of the onset of selforganization in this system is characterized by several peculiar features,
which emerge because of the long-range interparticle potential. In this contribution we present an analytical and numerical study of the dynamics
of selforganization, which is based on a Fokker-Planck equation we derived assuming that the atomic motion is in the semiclassical regime [2]. We
show that at steady state the sample is in a thermal distribution, whose temperature does not depend on the pump strength but is only limited by the
cavity linewidth. On the other hand, above threshold the steady state exhibits density-density correlations, to which one can associate a behaviour
analogous to magnetization. Using numerical simulations we show that the dynamics leading to the stationary state is characterized by two time
scales: after a violent relaxation, the system slowly reaches the stationary states over time scales which exceed the cavity lifetime by several orders
of magnitude. We analyze in details the corresponding field at the cavity output as a tool to monitor this behaviour. Finally, we draw analogies with
the Hamiltonian-Mean-Field model [3] and argue that this system can be used as a testbed for studying the predictions of the statistical mechanics
of long-range interacting systems.
References
[1] H. Ritsch, P. Domokos, F. Brennecke, and T. Esslinger, Rev. Mod. Phys. 85, 553 (2013)
[2] S. Schütz, H. Habibian, and G. Morigi, Phys. Rev. A 88, 033427 (2013)
[3] A. Campa, T. Dauxois, and S. Ruffo, Physics Reports 480, 57-159 (2009)
Tue 11:00
Advances on a hybrid quantum system of neutral atoms coupled to a superconducting
circuit: the atomic and optical side
Pablo Solano,
Joint Quantum Institute, University of Maryland
Pablo A. Solano1 , Jeffrey A. Grover1 , Jonathan E. Hoffman1 , Jongmin Lee1 , Luis Orozco1 , Steven L. Rolston1 , Fredrik K. Fatemi2 , Guy Beadie2
1 Joint Quantum Institute, NIST and Department of Physics, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742, USA.
2 Optical Sciences Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington DC, 20375, USA.
Coupling of a neutral atomic ensemble to superconducting circuits via a magnetic dipole transition forms an interesting hybrid system. Here we
present progress towards trapping cold rubidium atoms within 10 micrometers of a superconducting circuit using a cryogenically-compatible atom
trap and a tunable, high-Q superconducting resonator. Evanescent fields around an optical nanofiber with 99.95% transmission form an atom trap
suitable for a 15 mK dilution refrigerator. We explore higher-order guided modes in the nanofibers and study the dynamics of atoms near the
nanofiber through conditional measurements of the intensity.Work supported by NSF of the USA though the [email protected], the Atomtronics MURI,
ONR, and DARPA of the USA.
Tue 11:20
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Quantum Optics VII, 27-31 October 2014, Mar del Plata, ARGENTINA
Optical clock transition in a rare-earth-ion-doped crystal: coherence lifetime extension for quantum storage applications
Florencia Pascual-Winter,
Centro Atómico Bariloche & Instituto Balseiro Bariloche, Argentina
Being inherently robust to external perturbations, the atomic clock transitions provide longcoherence lifetimes well suited to quantum information
applications. Specifically, a clock transition frequency is insensitive (to first order) to fluctuations in its magnetic environment because of vanishing
partial derivatives with respect to one or more magnetic field coordinates. Remaining decoherence results from mechanisms reflected in higher
order dependences or mechanisms not affecting the transition frequency. Recently, clock transitions have been identified and exploited in rareearth-ion-doped crystals (REIDC) [1, 2], compact systems displaying long coherence lifetimes at low temperatures that have proved their suitability
for quantum storage applications [3]. In the context of REIDCs, clock transitions are also known as zero first order Zeeman shifts (ZEFOZ) points.
So far, only spin clock transitions have been analyzed and the spincoherence lifetime has been significantly increased (three orders of magnitude
[1, 2]). We present the first experimental demonstration of optical coherence extension at a clock transition in a REIDC. In the context of quantum
memory for light, a long lifetime optical coherence may help to avoid intermediate storage in spincoherence, a procedure that involves complex
and generally coherence-destructive conversion steps. The analysis has been performed in Tm:YAG, a REIDC particularly well-suited thanks to its
long upper levellifetime (800 µs). The combination of a Zeeman-like term and a quadratic electronic Zeeman term in the Hamiltonian, lead to the
existence of a magnetic field amplitude (12 mT) for which the derivative of theoptical transition energy with respect to the field amplitude vanishes,
regardless of the magnetic field orientation. We have verified this prediction through hole-burning spectroscopy experiments. In addition to that, a
study of the behavior of the Hamiltonian as a function of the magnetic field orientation yields the direction for which both derivatives with respect
to the magnetic field angular coordinates also vanish. That way, the three partial derivatives of the transition frequency with respect to the magnetic
field coordinates vanish simultaneously. A clock transition is thereby identified. Photon-echo experiments as a function of field amplitude do show
a five-fold increase of the optical coherence at the clock transition, leading to opticalcoherence lifetimes of the order of 500 µs, a significant fraction
of the theoretical limit given by twice the upper level lifetime.
References
[1] E. Fraval, M. J. Sellars, and J. J. Longdell, Phys. Rev. Lett. 92, 077601 (2004).
[2] G. Heinze, C. Hubrich, and T. Halfmann, Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 033601 (2013).
[3] W. Tittel, M. Afzelius, T. Chanelière, R. L. Cone, S. Kröll, S. A. Moiseev, and M. Sellars, Laser & Photon. Rev. 4, 244 (2010).
Tue 11:40
Squeezing and entanglement using atomic vapor
Arturo Lezama,
Universidad de la República, Facultad de Ingeniería, J.H. y Reissig 565, 11300 Montevideo, Uruguay
We review the generation of squeezed vacuum, polarization squeezing and two beam entanglement using nonlinear interaction by a single pump
beam with a rubidium vapor sample. We demonstrate the generation of entangled bright light beams and measure the quantum discord of the
achieved state.
Tue 14:00
High-fidelity heralded single-photon to single-atom quantum state transfer
Jürgen Eschner,
Universität Saarlandes
We implement an experimental protocol for heralded transfer of a single-photon polarization qubit to a qubit in a single atom. With laser photons
we achieve 96% state transfer fidelity.
Tue 14:45
Experiments to observe the entangled particles inside squeezed states
Morgan Mitchell,
ICFO-The Institute of Photonic Sciences
Squeezing, like superconductivity, is believed to be the result of entanglement of particles. Extraordinary claims, e.g. 170-partite entanglement,
have been made based on “spin-squeezing inequalities.” Can we observe the particle entanglement underlying a macroscopic quantum state? I will
describe two experiments, one with atoms and one with photons, that measure the entanglement of particles in a squeezed state. Using quantum
non-demolition measurements on a spin ensemble, we produce a macroscopic spin singlet, an unpolarized squeezed state containing at least 500,000
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Quantum Optics VII, 27-31 October 2014, Mar del Plata, ARGENTINA
entangled atoms. In another experiment, we extract photons from a polarization-squeezed beam and measure their entanglement properties. We
observe that all photons arriving within the squeezing coherence time are entangled.
Tue 14:00
Ancilla-assisted measurement of photonic spatial correlations and entanglement
Stephen Walborn,
Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro
We report an experiment in which the moments of spatial coordinates in down-converted photons directly, without having to reconstruct any
marginal probability distributions. We use a spatial light modulator to couple the spatia degrees of freedom and the polarization of the fields, which
acts as an ancilla system. Information about the spatial correlations is obtained via measurements on the ancilla qubit. Among other applications,
this new method provides a more efficient technique to identify continuous variable entanglement.
Tue 14:45
Reliable quantum certification for photonic quantum technologies
Leandro Aolita,
Freie Universität Berlin
Photonic devices involving many optical modes promise major advances in quantum technologies, with applications ranging from quantum metrology over quantum computing to quantum simulations. A significant current roadblock for the development of such devices, however, is the lack
of practical reliable certification tools. Here, we present one such tool. We start by carefully defining different notions of quantum-state certification tests. Then, we introduce an experimentally friendly, yet mathematically rigorous, certification test for experimental preparations of arbitrary
m-mode pure Gaussian states as well as a class of pure non-Gaussian states common in linear-optical experiments, including those given by a
Gaussian unitary acting on Fock basis states with n bosons. The protocol is efficient for all Gaussian states and all mentioned non-Gaussian states
with constant n. We follow the formal mindset of an untrusted prover, who prepares the state, and a skeptic certifier, equipped only with classical
computing and single-mode measurement capabilities. No assumptions are made on the type of quantum noise or experimental capabilities of
the prover. We build upon an extremality property that leads to a practical fidelity lower bound, interesting in its own right. Experimentally, our
technique relies on single-mode homodyne detection. With this method, the efficient and reliable certification of large-scale photonic networks,
with a constant number of input photons, as those used for photonic quantum simulations, boson samplers, and quantum metrology is within reach.
Tue 15:30
Boson Sampling in photonic chips
Ernesto Galvão,
Instituto de Física, Universidade Federal Fluminense (Brazil)
Integrated photonic chip technologies enable the implementation of stable, large-scale interferometers withapplications ranging from quantum
metrology to quantum computation. Recently, a theoretical proposalshowed that a restricted quantum optical computer could solve a computational
task which is stronglybelieved to be hard for classical computers (the so-called boson sampling problem [1]). I will describe a fewexperiments
I’ve been involved in recently, and which showcase some of the properties of multi-photoninterference in photonic chips. We have experimentally
solved a small instance of the boson samplingproblem [2], succesfully verifying the proper functioning of the device [3]. We have also carried
out asystematic study of photonic bunching in these chips [4]. This is joint work with Daniel Brod (UFF) and thequantum optics groups of Fabio
Sciarrino (Rome) and Roberto Osellame (Milan).
References:
[1] Aaronson, S. and Arkhipov, A. The computation complexity of linear optics. In Proceedings of the 43rdannual ACM symposium on Theory of
computing, San Jose, 2011 (ACM press, New York, 2011), 333–342(2011).
[2] Crespi, A. et al. Integrated multimode interferometers with arbitrary designs for photonic boson sampling.Nature Photonics 7, 545 (2013).
[3] N. Spagnolo et al. Efficient experimental validation of photonic boson sampling. arXiv:1311.1622 [quantph].Nature Photonics (in press, 2014).
[4] Spagnolo, N. et al. General rules for bosonic bunching in multimode interferometers. Phys. Rev. Lett. 111,130503 (2013).
Tue 15:50
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Quantum Optics VII, 27-31 October 2014, Mar del Plata, ARGENTINA
Quantum-polarization tomography for arbitrary photon statistics
Sascha Wallentowitz,
Instituto de Física, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Santiago, Chile
S. Wallentowitz (1), A.B. Klimov (2), J.L. Romero (2)
(1) Instituto de Física, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Santiago, Chile
(2) Departamento de Física, Universidad de Guadalajara, Guadalajara, Mexico
The quantum-state reconstruction of polarized light has been of large interest in recent years. For singlephotons, few appropriately chosen projections allow to determine the density matrix of the polarized light withhigh accuracy. On the other hand, for large photon numbers, a continuousvariable approach has beenemployed that is limited to a so-called polarization sector. However, when the photon number is neither verysmall nor
very large, none of the above mentioned approaches are feasible. In this case, crucial information on the polarized-light quantum state is contained
beyond the polarization sectors.In this contribution we present a tomographic scheme for polarized light, that is capable of reconstructing thecomplete quantum state for any photon-number statistics, surpassing the above-mentioned limitations ofpresently known methods. It consists of an
optical homodyne setup triggered by the outcome of a singlephotoncounting module [A.B. Klimov, J.L. Romero, S. Wallentowitz, Phys. Rev. A
89, 020101(R) (2014)].
Tue 15:30
Quantum tomography in phase space
Zdenek Hradil,
Department of Optics, Palacky University, Olomouc, Czech Republic
Quantum tomography is a method inspired by quantum-state estimation for inferring the quantities whichcannot be measured directly. In the talk we
will consider the analogies between optics, quantum mechanicsand information processing in order to assess the ultimate limitations and resolution
for opticalobservations. Special attention will be paid to the Shack-Hartmann detection and tomography in phasespace.
Tue 15:50
The quest for the kings of quantumness
Luis Sánchez-Soto,
Max-Planck-Institut für die Physik des Lichts, Erlangen, Germany
Facultad de Física, Universidad Complutense, Madrid, Spain
We capitalize on a multipolar expansion of the polarization density matrix, in which multipoles appear as the successive moments of the Stokes
variables. When all the multipoles up to a given order K vanish, we can properly say that the state is Kth-order unpolarized, as it lacks of any
polarization information to that order. First-order unpolarized states coincide with the corresponding classical ones, whereas unpolarized to any
order tally with the quantum notion of fully invariant states. In between these two extreme cases, there is a rich variety of situations that are explored
here and show that they are the most quantum states.
Tue 16:35
Experimental Quantum Optics: a testbed for quantum measurement and quantum
decoherence
Alejandra Valencia,
Universidad de los Andes, Colombia
Photons can be described by considering its different degrees of freedom, polarization, frequency, andspatial variables that may include transverse
momentum and orbital angular momentum. In this talk, I willdescribe our research on the experimental control of the coupling between continuous
and discrete degreesof freedoms of heralded single photons and paired photons generated by spontaneous parametricdownconversion (SPDC). The
control over this coupling opens possibilities to study topics such as openquantum systems and measurement theory. In particular, I will describe
our experiments where we couplethe frequency variable and polarization to study quantum decoherence effects and the ones in which wecouple
space and polarization to study measurement theory.
Tue 16:55
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Quantum Optics VII, 27-31 October 2014, Mar del Plata, ARGENTINA
Transmission of Quantum Information through Dispersive Media
Paul Lett,
Joint Quantum Institute, National Institute of Standards and Technology
We study the transmission of information through fast- and slow-light media. Using information-theoreticdefinitions and homodyne detection
we can study in a consistent way the transmission of quantuminformation through fast- and slow-light media. Using both phase insensitive and
phase sensitive opticalamplifiers we can study the effect of quantum noise on the information transmission, and the relationshipbetween noise and
dispersion.
Tue 16:35
Indistinguishable photons from a semiconductor quantum dot in an adiabatic micro pillar cavity; competing roles of timing-jitter and pure-dephasing
Dara McCutcheon,
Technical University of Denmark
In this talk I will present recent experimental and theoretical results exploring the indistinguishability of photons emitted from a quasi-resonantly
excited quantum dot embedded in an adiabatic micro pillar cavity. We show that for Hong-Ou-Mandel (HOM) experiments which measure detection
coincidence events vs time-delay, both the timing-jitter induced by the quasi-resonant excitation condition, and sources of pure-dephasing affect the
shape of the HOM dip in approximately the same way. As such, these experiments alone are unable to distinguish between imperfections due to
timing-jitter and those due to pure-dephasing processes. We show, however, that when detuning the quantum dot and cavity mode, timing-jitter and
pure-dephasing have the opposite effect on the indistinguishability, thus allowing us to experimentally determine their influences. Finally, we will
discuss the implications of these results for the design of new quantum dot cavity based sources.
Tue 16:55
Quantum fluctuations of spectral modes of light: resonator detection and characterization of Gaussian states
Paulo Nussenzveig,
Instituto de Física, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP, Brazil
F.A.S. Barbosa1 , A.S. Coelho1 , K.N. Cassemiro2 , C. Fabre3 , A.S. Villar2 , M. Martinelli1 , and P. Nussenzveig1 ;
1 Instituto de Física, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP, Brazil.;
2 Departamento de Física, CCEN, Universidade Federal de Pernambuco,
3
Recife, PE, Brazil.;
Laboratoire Kastler Brossel, Universite Pierre et Marie Curie, Paris, France.
The spectrally resolved measurement of quantum properties of light beams typically encompasses at least two modes. We show here how much information can be extracted by this method and discuss its implications to the characterization of Gaussian states and the application of entanglement
criteria to bright beams of light.We have recently reviewed in detail the detection of quantum fluctuations of light in the spectral domain [1]. The
most widely employed strategy of spectral homodyne detection cannot provide sufficient information to fully reconstruct an unknown quantum
state. Resonator detection [2], on the other hand, is capable of providing more information, although it still relies on assumptions in typical experiments.The general strategy to measure quantum properties of spectral modes consists of beating the signal from photodetection with a reference
signal at a certain frequency Ω. The beatnote contains information from two (sideband) modes, symmetrically detuned from the carrier mode.
Thus, one is forced to deal with two spectral modes per beam in order to properly describe the system. Spectral homodyne detection is inherently
incapable of providing full infor-mation about the quantum state because it does not distinguish between sidebands positively detuned or negatively
detuned from the carrier mode. It is thus blind to any energy imbalance between these sidebands. Resonator detection does not treat sideband
modes with the same degree of symmetry. On the other hand, the optical field undergoes phase diffusion and therefore there is no common phase
reference between optical and electronic local oscillators in typical experiments.With a few assumptions, it is still possible to test for the Gaussian
or non-Gaussian character of light beams. We have performed exhaustive testing in the six-mode state encompassing pump-signal-idler beams from
an above-threshold optical parametric oscillator (OPO). Our results provide a very strong indication that the generated state is indeed Gaussian [3],
validating the use of necessary and sufficient criteria to analyze entanglement in this system.Our work was supported by Brazilian agencies FAPESP
and CNPq (through Instituto Nacional de Ciência e Tecnologia em Informaca¸o Quãntica). We also acknowledge support from CNRS, within a
FAPESP-CNRS collaboration.
References
[1] F. A. S. Barbosa, A. S. Coelho, K. N. Cassemiro, P. Nussenzveig, C. Fabre, A. S. Villar, and M. Martinelli, Phys. Rev. A 88, 052113 (2013).
[2] A. S. Villar, Am. J. Phys. 76, 922 (2008).
[3] A. S. Coelho, F. A. S. Barbosa, K. N. Cassemiro, M. Martinelli, A. S. Villar, , and P. Nussenzveig, Analyzing the Gaussian character of spectral
modes of light via photocurrent measurements (in preparation).
Tue 17:15
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Quantum Optics VII, 27-31 October 2014, Mar del Plata, ARGENTINA
Dynamical analogue quantum simulators
Jens Eisert,
Freie Universität, Berlin
Complex quantum systems out of equilibrium are at the basis of a number of long-standing questions in physics. This talk will be concerned on
the one hand with recent progress on understanding how quantum many-body systems out of equilibrium eventually come to rest, thermalise and
cross phase transitions, on the other hand with dynamical analogue quantum simulations using cold atoms [1-4]. In an outlook, we will discuss the
question of certification of quantum simulators, and will how this problem also arises in other related settings, such as in Boson samplers [5,6].
References
[1] S. Braun, M. Friesdorf, S. S. Hodgman, M. Schreiber, J. P. Ronzheimer, A. Riera, M. del Rey, I. Bloch, J. Eisert, U. Schneider, arXiv:1403.7199.
[2] M. Kliesch, M. Kastoryano, C. Gogolin, A. Riera, J. Eisert, Phys. Rev. X 4, 031019 (2014).
[3] S. Trotzky, Y.-A. Chen, A. Flesch, I. P. McCulloch, U. Schollwoeck, J. Eisert, I. Bloch, Nature Physics 8, 325 (2012).[4] A. Riera, C. Gogolin, M.
Kliesch, J. Eisert, in preparation (2014).[5] C. Gogolin, M. Kliesch, L. Aolita, J. Eisert, in preparation (2014) and arXiv:1306.3995.[6] S. Aaronson,
A. Arkhipov, arXiv:1309.7460.
Tue 18:00
Quantum control using fast transitions
Diego Wisniacki,
Departamento de Física, FCEyN UBA
Unitary control and decoherence appear to be irreconcilable in quantum mechanics. When a quantumsystem interacts with an environment, control
strategies usually fail due to decoherence. We propose a timeoptimalunitary control protocol suitable for quantum open systems. The method is
based on succesivediabatic and sudden switch transitions in the avoided crossings of the energy spectra of closed systems. Weshow that the speed
of this control protocol meets the fundamental bounds imposed by the quantum speedlimit, thus making this scheme ideal for application where
decoherence needs to be avoided. We show thatour method can achieve complex control strategies with high accuracy in quantum open systems.
Wed 9:00
Quantum control of driven artificial atoms
María José Sanchez,
Centro Atómico Bariloche and Instituto Balseiro
In laser physics the usual mechanism to induce Population Inversion (PI) requires three or more atomic levels. Interesting systems to study PI
are ‘artificial atoms’ made with mesoscopic Josephson devices. Among them, is the flux qubit (FQ), which for millikelvin temperatures exhibits
quantized energy levels that are sensitive to an external magnetic field. When the FQ is driven with an ac field, it can be excited to the third
and fourth energy levels through Landau-Zener transitions. The interaction with the external circuitry provides the mechanisms for relaxation and
decoherence necessary to induce PI. In this talk a more striking effect is described : PI mediated by the environmental bath in the regime where
only the two lowest levels of the FQ participate. I will describe: (i) how this bath mediated type of PI can be obtained and (ii) how the occurrence
and the degree of PI can be tailored by changing the structure of the environmental bath.
References
[1] Tailoring population inversion in Landau-Zener-Stuckelberg interferometry of flux qubits, A. Ferrón, D. Dominguez and M. J. Sánchez, Pys.
Rev. Lett. 109, 237005 (2012).
[2] Mesoscopic fluctuations in artificial atoms driven by biharmonic signals. A. Ferrón, D. Dominguez and M. J. Sánchez, submitted (2014).
Wed 9:20
Quantum control of a model qubit based on quantum dots
Omar Osenda,
Facultad de Matematica, Astronomia y Fisica - Universidad Nacional de Cordoba Instituto de Fisica Enrique Gaviola
In this work we present a model qubit whose basis states are eigenstates of quantum dots. We show that the proper design of the quantum dot
results in qubit states that have excellent dynamical properties when a time-dependent driving is applied to it. In particular, it is shown that a
simple sinusoidal driving is sufficient to obtain good quality Rabi oscillations between the qubit states. Moreover, the switching between states can
be performed with very low leakage, even under off-resonance conditions. In this sense, the quantum control of the qubit is robust under some
perturbations and achieved with simple means.
Wed 9:40
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Quantum Optics VII, 27-31 October 2014, Mar del Plata, ARGENTINA
Born rule from probability theory
Aldo Delgado,
Center for Optics and Photonics, Universidad de Concepción, Chile
We construct a probability theory based on paraconsistent propositional logical calculus. This theory incorporates the concept of contradiction, that
is, it allows to handle situations in which a theorem and its negation are true. Using this new probability theory we deduced a total probability rule
identical quantum mechanical one, which is equivalent to Born rule.
Wed 10:00
Large-scale hypercubic-lattice cluster-state entanglement in the quantum optical
frequency comb
Olivier Pfister,
University of Virginia
We present the experimental generation of large-scale continuous-variable cluster entangled states in the quantum optical frequency comb defined
by the resonant modes of the cavity of an optical parametric oscillator (OPO). We recently demonstrated the generation of a 60-qumode dual-rail
linear cluster state, as well as two independent 30-qumode ones. We also detail a new proposal for the experimental generation of cluster states
forming hypercubic lattices, which requires one OPO per lattice dimension.
Wed 9:00
Resilience of hybrid optical angular momentum qubits to turbulence
Osvaldo Jiménez Farías,
Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Físicas
Recent schemes to encode quantum information into the total angular momentum of light, defining rotation-invariant hybrid qubits composed of
the polarization and orbital angular momentum degrees of freedom, present interesting applications for quantum information technology. However,
there remains the question as to how detrimental effects such as random spatial perturbations affect these encodings. Here, we demonstrate that
alignment-free quantum communication through a turbulent channel based on hybrid qubits can be achieved with unit transmission delity. In our
experiment, alignment-free qubits are produced with q-plates and sent through a homemade turbulence chamber. The decoding procedure, also
realized with q-plates, relies on both degrees of freedom and renders an intrinsic error-ltering mechanism that maps errors into losses.
Wed 9:20
Fractional topological phases for entangled qudits
Antonio Khoury,
Universidade Federal Fluminense
We discuss the geometric phase acquired by entangled qudits evolving under local unitary operations. A general expression is derived for cyclic
evolutions, which involves a fractional contribution from topological origin and a holonomic contribution which corresponds to a generalization of
the well known solid angle expression for qubits. This holonomic contribution is weighted by entanglement and vanishes for maximally entangled
states of qudits with equal dimensions. In this case, only fractional phases are attainable under cyclic evolutions. We will briefly discuss qudits with
different dimensions and an experimental proposal with spatially encoded photonic qudits.
Wed 9:40
Experimental insights in quantum imaging with undetected photons
Gabriela Barreto Lemos,
Institute of quantum optics and quantum information (IQOQI) - Austrian Academy of Sciences (ÖAW).
I will talk about the experimental implementation of Quantum Imaging with Undetected Photons. Specifically, I will explain the relevant experimental parameters and their role in quantum imaging. I will show some unusual and counterintuitive phenomena that make this a unique interferometric
setup that is a rich platform for the investigation of quantum optics and quantum information.
Wed 10:00
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Quantum Optics VII, 27-31 October 2014, Mar del Plata, ARGENTINA
Revealing quantum aspects of a strong cavity field
Celso Villas-Boas,
UFSCar-Brasil
Quantum theory predicts many non-classical and intriguing phenomena, such as quantum superposition of states and non-locality, which are difficult
to be observed in the macroscopic world. The emergence of classical physics from quantum mechanics in the limit of large excitation numbers or
in systems of many particles have been actively studied and some of the explanations include decoherence due to interaction with the environment
or restrictions due to the inaccuracy of measurements. To observe the classical or quantum behavior of a given system we need to introduce the
apparatus of measurement to observe their properties, which in quantum theory is not a simple task. The interaction of a given system with the measurement apparatus modifies its dynamics so that the observation of quantum-classical transition might depend on the used measurer. For radiation
fields trapped within superconducting cavities one usually employs a single atom as the measurer for the cavity-field properties. For example in Ref.
[1] the quantum-classical transition was investigated by gradually raising the effective temperature of a circuit-quantum-electrodynamics system: it
was shown that the quantum aspects of the atom-field system disappear when the effective temperature is raised, i.e., increasing the average number
of photons in the cavity mode. In this talk we will discuss how one could observe the manifestation of the quantum aspects of a strong radiation
field trapped in a dissipative cavity. To this end we must consider the interaction of two two-level atoms (instead of just one) with the cavity mode
[2]. We have found that the radiation field is always able to generate correlations (quantum or classical) between the atoms, even in the macroscopic
limit (for coherent or incoherent cavity fields), thus revealing the quantum nature of light even in this limit [2]. Therefore, the cavity mode always
preserves quantum features in the macroscopic limit, which is revealed by the correlations (classical correlations or quantum discord) generated in
the atomic steady state. One important question is concerning the time required to generate such correlations between the atoms: we have found
that, for coherent fields, this time is proportional to the mean number of photons, as one could expect. But, interestingly, this is not the case for
incoherent fields, presenting a faster generation of correlations between atoms as one increases the average number of photons of the field.
References
[1] J. M. Fink et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 105, 163601 (2010).
[2] D. Z. Rossatto, T. Werlang, E. I. Duzzioni, C. J. Villas-Boas, Phys. Rev. Lett. 107, 153601 (2011); Daniel Z. Rossatto, Ph-D Thesis –“Correlações quânticas e transição quântico-clássica em cavidades ópticas”, UFSCar (2014).
Wed 10:35
Two-particle quantum interference in tunnel-coupled optical tweezers
Brian Lester,
JILA, National Institute of Standards and Technology and University of Colorado, and Department of Physics, University of Colorado
We present recent work in which we demonstrate near-complete control over all the internal and external degrees of freedom of single laser-cooled
87Rb atoms trapped in sub-micron optical tweezers. By dynamically introducing a tunnel-coupling between the tweezers, we implement a massiveparticle analog of the Hong-Ou-Mandel effect where atom tunneling plays the role of the photon beamsplitter. The HOM effect is used to probe the
effect of atomic indistinguishability on the two-atom dynamics for a variety of initial conditions. These experiments demonstrate the viability of
the optical tweezer platform for bottom-up generation of low-entropy quantum systems and provide an alternate route toward direct observation of
quantum dynamics in tunable finite-sized systems.
Wed 10:35
Inverse spontaneous emission of an atom in free space – an example of time reversal symmetry in optics
Gerd Leuchs,
Max Planck Institute for the Science of Light, Erlangen, Germany. Institut für Optik, Information und Photonik,
University of Erlangen-Nuremberg. Department of Physics, University of Ottawa.
The coupling between light and a single atom in free space is probably the most fundamental process in quantum optics. The best strategy for
efficiently coupling light to a single atom in free space depends on the goal. If the goal is to maximally attenuate a laser beam, narrow-band
on-resonance laser radiation is required as well as a wave front approaching the atom from a 2π solid angle. If, on the other hand, the goal is to fully
absorb the light bringing the atom to the excited state with unit success probability one will have to provide a single photon designed to represent
the time reversed wave packet which the atom would emit in a spontaneous emission process. All these strategies require efficient coupling: the
light wave has to impinge from the full 4π solid angle. The state of the art is reviewed and the experimental progress is discussed. If successful this
approach will allow for building a few photon quantum gate without a cavity, with possible applications in quantum information processing.
References
[1] G. Leuchs and M. Sondermann, “Lightmatter interaction in free space” J. Mod. Opt. 60, 36 (2013)
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[2] M. Fischer, M. Bader, R. Maiwald, A. Golla, M. Sondermann, G. Leuchs, “Efficient saturation of an ion in free space”, arXiv:1311.1982 (2013).
[3] M. Bader, S. Heugel, A.L. Chekhov, M. Sondermann and G. Leuchs, “Efficient coupling to an optical resonator by exploiting time-reversal
symmetry”, New J. Phys 15, 123008 (2013)
[4] G. Alber, J. Z. Bernád, M. Stobi´nska, L. L. Sánchez-Soto, and G. Leuchs, “QED with a parabolic mirror”, Phys. Rev. A 88, 023825 (2013)
[5] G. Leuchs and M. Sondermann, “Time reversal symmetry in optics”, Phys. Scr. 85, 058101 (2012)
Wed 10:55
Open Quantum Walks: dynamics, thermodynamics and transport
Francesco Petruccione,
School of Chemistry and Physics, University of KwaZulu-Natal,
Westville Campus, Durban 4000, South Africa
A new model of quantum walks which are exclusively driven by the interaction with a dissipative environment is presented [S. Attal et. al. J. Stat.
Phys. 147, Issue 4, 832 (2012)]. Open Quantum Walks (OQWs) are the exact quantum analogue of classical Markov chains. OQWs have been
shown to be useful for the implementation of quantum algorithms for dissipative quantum computing and quantum state engineering [I. Sinayskiy
and F. Petruccione, QIP 11, 1301 (2012)] and to model quantum transport in biological systems [I. Sinayskiy and F. Petruccione, in preparation].
Recently, the connection between the rich dynamical behavior of OQWs and the corresponding microscopic system-environment models has been
established. The microscopic derivation of an OQW as a reduced system [I. Sinayskiy, F. Petruccione, Open Syst. & Inf. Dyn. 20, 1340007 (2013)]
allows to explain the dependance of the dynamical behavior of the OQW on the temperature and the coupling to the environment. A continuous in
space and time version of OQWs, namely Open Quantum Brownian Motion (OQBM) will be discussed as well. The microscopic derivation of the
OQBM will be presented. Physical realizations of OQWs in quantum optical setups will be discussed.
Wed 11:40
Macroscopic Entanglement
Nicolas Sangouard,
University of Geneva
Entanglement is the most dramatic feature of quantum theory and as such, it raises many interesting questions. This talk aims to tackle one of them
namely, how difficult is it to observe entanglement in macroscopic states? The starting point is to define unambiguously what is a macroscopic
entangled state. By focusing on Schroedinger cat like states |↑ Q |A M + |↓ Q |D M , we will propose a definition in which the components |A M and
|D M are macroscopically distinct if they can be distinguished with a coarse-grained measurement [1]. This follows the intuition that there is no
need for a microscopic resolution to distinguish the dead and alive components of the Schroedinger cat. We will then consider an example, i.e. a
photon counting measurement with a resolution coarse-grained by noise. The aim of this example is twofold. First, it will be used to show how
our definition can be extended to a measure of macroscopicity for photonic states [2], the size of a given state being defined from the noise that can
be tolerated. Second, it will be at the core of already performed experiments [3, 4] and of on-going experimental investigations [6]. The former
reports an entangled state involving almost a thousand photons and exhibiting macroscopically distinct components. The latter shows how states
that are macro with respect to our measure might be useful to test unconventional decoherence models through opto-mechanical devices. We will
conclude by showing in full generality that as soon as two components are distinguishable with measurement devices lacking microscopic accuracy,
i.e. measurements suffering from coarse-graining or limited sensitivity, it is very difficult to distinguish their superposition from a mere mixture. In
other words, the more distinguishable the components of a superposition state, the more demanding is the stability required to observe its quantum
features [5].
References
[1] P. Sekatski et al. Phys. Rev. A 86, 060301 (2012).
[2] P. Sekatski, N. Sangouard, and N. Gisin, Phys. Rev. A 89, 012116 (2014).
[3] N. Bruno et al. Nature Phys. 9, 545 (2013).
[4] A. Lvovsky et al. Nature Phys. 9, 541 (2013).
[5] P. Sekatski, M. Aspelmeyer, and N. Sangouard, Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 080502 (2014).
[6] P. Sekatski, N. Gisin, and N. Sangouard, Phys. Rev. Lett. 113, 090403 (2014).
Wed 10:55
A principle for quantum correlations
Adán Cabello,
Universidad de Sevilla
A recently introduced principle, the E principle, singles out the quantum bounds of the simplest qutrit non-contextuality inequality (KCBS), the
simplest Bell inequality (CHSH) and the Bell-type inequalities that detect true n-body quantum non-locality. It also explains why all extremal
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Quantum Optics VII, 27-31 October 2014, Mar del Plata, ARGENTINA
non-local boxes in the 3-party, 2-setting, 2-outcome scenario are not feasible and singles out the entire set of quantum correlations corresponding
to self-complementary graphs of exclusivity. No other principle has gone that far in explaining quantum correlations. The E principle is subtle
and cannot be derived from Kolmogorov’s axioms. It states that any set of n pairwise exclusive events (i.e., results of compatible tests) is n-wise
exclusive. Interestingly, the E principle shows its full power when the possibility of performing additional, statistically independent, experiments
or subsequent experiments is taken into account.
Wed 11:40
Exploitation of transverse structure in non-classical light sources
Alfred U’Ren,
Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de Mexico (UNAM)
In this talk I will discuss some recent results from my research group relating to the exploitation of transverse structure as a resource for tailoring
spatio-temporal entanglement. I will discuss both free-space examples relating to bulk-crystal sources and transversely confined examples relating
to multi-mode waveguides.
Wed 14:15
Classification of protected gates for subsystem codes
Fernando Pastawski,
California Institute of Technology
Quantum error correcting code (QECC) fulfill the important task of protecting quantum information from decoherence. Ideally, this protection
should extend to the possibility of building logical quantum gates in a manner which is robust to errors from geometrically local elementary
operations. However, Bravyi and König have shown that there is a tradeoff between the expressive power of protected gates and the geometric
locality of stabilizer codes. We extend this result to the setting of subsystem codes and show that the expressively of the logical gate set is similarly
constrained.
Wed 14:15
Quantum Networking with with Trapped Ions
Christopher Monroe,
JQI and University of Maryland
Laser-cooled atomic ions are standards for quantum information science, as qubits that have unsurpassed levels of quantum coherence and can
be measured with near-perfect efficiency. When state-dependent optical dipole forces are applied to a collection of atomic ions, their Coulomb
interaction is modulated in a way that allows the entanglement of the qubits through quantum gates. Similar forces allow the simulation of quantum
magnetic interactions, and recent experiments have implemented a transverse Ising model with up to 20 trapped ions, the largest collection of
interacting qubits yet demonstrated. Soon the number of spins in the system will be high enough where no classical computer can predict its
behavior. We report several experiments studying equilibrium and dynamics in this many-body quantum simulator [1-3]. Scaling to even larger
numbers can be accomplished by coupling trapped ion qubits to photons, where entanglement can be formed over remote distances for applications
in quantum communication, quantum teleportation, and distributed quantum computation. We report the modular entanglement of three ions
using both local Coulomb gates and remote photonic gates [4], and on methods for stabilizing the qubit phase in such experiments with multiple
entanglement buses [5]. By employing such a modular architecture [6], it should be possible to scale up ion trap quantum networks to useful
dimensions, for future applications in quantum computing and quantum communication.
References
[1] R. Islam, C. Senko, W. C. Campbell, S. Korenblit, J. Smith, A. Lee, E. E. Edwards, C.-C. J. Wang, J. K. Freericks, and C. Monroe, Science 340,
583 (2013).
[2] P. Richerme, Z.-X. Gong, A. Lee, C. Senko, J. Smith, M. Foss-Feig, S. Michalakis, A. V. Gorshkov, and C. Monroe, Nature 511, 198 (2014).
[3] C. Senko, J. Smith, P. Richerme, A. Lee, W.C. Campbell, and C. Monroe, Science 345, 430 (2014).
[4] D. Hucul, I.V. Inlek, G. Vittorini, C. Crocker, S. Debnath, S.M. Clark, and C. Monroe, arXiv 1403.3696 (2014).
[5] I.V. Inlek, G. Vittorini, D. Hucul, C. Crocker, and C. Monroe, arXiv 1405.5207 (2014).
[6] C. Monroe, R. Raussendorf, A. Ruthven, K. R. Brown, P. Maunz, L.-M. Duan, J. Kim, Phys. Rev. A 89, 022317 (2014).
Wed 15:00
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Quantum Optics VII, 27-31 October 2014, Mar del Plata, ARGENTINA
10 things you always wanted to know about non-Markovian open quantum systems.
Sabrina Maniscalco,
University of Turku
In this talk I will pose 10 questions on non-Markovian open quantum systems and present my view on their answers. These are questions that
I’ve been asked many times in the last 10 years and often come from misunderstandings of what we actually mean with non-Markovian quantum
dynamics. In so doing I will introduce some non-Markovianity measures [1]-[4] and discuss their interest for quantum technologies [4]. The formal
analogy between open quantum system theory and entanglement theory described in Ref. [5] will be the leitmotiv of my presentation.
References:[1] H.-P. Breuer, E.-M. Laine, J. Piilo, Phys. Rev. Lett., 210401 (2009)
[2] A. Rivas, S.F. Huelga, and M.B. Plenio, Phys. Rev. Lett. 105, 050403 (2010).
[3] B.-H. Liu, L. Li, Y.-F. Huang, C.-F. Li, G.-C. Guo, E.-M. Laine, H.-P. Breuer, and J. Piilo, Nat. Phys. 7, 931-934 (2011).
[4] B. Bylicka, D. Chru´sci´nski and S. Maniscalco, Scientific Reports 4, 5720 (2014).
[5] D. Chru´sci´nski and S. Maniscalco, Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 120404 (2014).
Thu 9:00
Sequential quantum measurements
Janos Bergou,
Department of Physics and Astronomy, Hunter College of the City University of New York
It is generally assumed that in the process of performing a measurement on a quantum system the state of the system collapses to one of the
eigenstates of the physical quantity that is being measured. Recent works, however, are challenging this concept (see, for example [1]). In this
talk we will show, using the formalism of generalized quantum measurements, that this so-called collapse postulate is not absolute; there are
ways to get around it [2]. In fact, the post-measurement state of the system can be designed with a great deal of flexibility. If one chooses an
appropriate figure of merit to characterize further processing of the system after the measurement has been performed, one can even optimize the
post-measurement states to maximize the corresponding figure of merit. The ideas will be illustrated on two examples. In the first example multiple
observers determine the initial state of a qubit, employing the strategy of unambiguous state discrimination, by performing subsequent observations
on the same qubit without revealing the measurement results to each other. In the second example multiple observers determine the initial state
of a qubit, but this time employing the strategy of minimum error discrimination, again by performing subsequent observations on the same qubit
without revealing the measurement results to each other. State discrimination with minimum error is the prime example for a standard (projective)
quantum measurement, so it is even more surprising that the post-measurement states can be designed with some flexibility. In both scenarios we
optimize the post-measurement states to maximize the joint probability of success, i.e., the probability that each observer in the sequence will learn
the initial state of the quit. Finally, we will show that similar ideas can be applied to telling the past history of a quantum system, conditioned on
the outcomes of measurements performed in the present.
References
[1] P. Rapˇcan, J. Calsamiglia, R. Muãoz-Tapia, E. Bagan, and V. Bužek, Phys. Rev. A 84, 032326 (2012).
[2] J. A. Bergou, E. Feldman, and M. Hillery, Extracting information from a qubit by multiple observers:Toward a theory of sequential state
discrimination, Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 100501 (2013).
Thu 9:20
Non-Markovianity through accessible information
Felipe Fanchini,
São Paulo State University
The degree of non-Markovianity of quantum processes has been characterized in several different ways in the recent literature. However, the
relationship between the non-Markovian behavior and the flow of information between the system and the environment through an entropic measure
has not been yet established. We propose an entanglement-based measure of non-Markovianity by employing the concept of assisted knowledge,
where the environment E, acquires information about a system S, by means of its measurement apparatus A. The assisted knowledge, based on the
accessible information in terms of von-Neumann entropy, monotonically increases in time for all Markovian quantum processes. We demonstrate
that the signatures of non-Markovianity can be captured by the nonmonotonic behaviour of the assisted knowledge. We explore this scenario for a
two-level system undergoing a relaxation process, through an experimental implementation using an optical approach that allows full access to the
state of the environment.
Thu 9:40
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Quantum Optics VII, 27-31 October 2014, Mar del Plata, ARGENTINA
Multigraph approach to quantum non-locality and contextuality
Marcelo Terra Cunha,
Departamento de Matemática, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, MG, Brazil
Non-contextuality (NC) and Bell inequalities can be expressed as bounds for positive linear combinations of probabilities of events. Exclusive
events can be represented as adjacent vertices of a graph called the exclusivity graph of the inequality. In the case that events correspond to the
outcomes of quantum projective measurements, quantum probabilities are intimately related to the Grötschel–Lovász–Schrijver theta body of the
exclusivity graph. Then, one can easily compute an upper bound to the maximum quantum violation of any NC or Bell inequality by optimising
the inequality over the theta body and calculating the Lovász number of the corresponding exclusivity graph. In some cases, this upper bound is
tight and gives the exact maximum quantum violation. However, in general, this is not the case. The reason is that the exclusivity graph does not
distinguish among the different ways exclusivity can occur in Bell-inequality (and similar) scenarios. An interesting question is whether there is
a graph-theoretical concept which accounts for this problem. We show that, for any given N-partite Bell inequality, an edge-coloured multigraph
composed of N single-colour graphs can be used to encode the relationships of exclusivity between each party’s parts of the events. Then, the
maximum quantum violation of the Bell inequality is exactly given by a refinement of the Lovász number that applies to these edge-coloured
multigraphs. We calculate upper bounds for this number using a hierarchy of semi-definite programs, considering I3 , I3322 and the three bipartite
Bell inequalities whose exclusivity graph is a pentagon. An interesting feature of the multigraph-theoretical approach introduced is that it can be
applied not only to Bell scenarios but also to more general ones, where, in each party, contextuality-like restrictions may exist.
Thu 10:00
Systematic Construction of Genuine Multipartite Entanglement Criteria using Uncertainty Relations
Fabricio Toscano,
Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ)
A general procedure to construct criteria for identifying genuine multipartite continuous variable entanglement is presented. This relies on the proper
definition of global canonical operators describing the multipartite system, the positive partial transpose criterion of separability, and quantum
mechanical uncertainty relations. As a consequence our criterion consists of a single inequality nicely computable and experimentally feasible
that when violated is sufficient condition for genuine multipartite entanglement. Additionally we show that the previous work of van Loock and
Furusawa [Phys. Rev. A, 67, 052315 (2003)] is a special case of our result that includes strongest criteria to detect entanglement.
Thu 9:00
Geometric quantum discords
Dominique Spehner,
Université Grenoble Alpes, Institut Fourier, F-38000 Grenoble, France and CNRS, LPMMC, F-38000 Grenoble,
France
The geometric quantum discord is a measure of quantum correlations which has similar properties than the quantum discord proposed by Ollivier
and Zurek [1] and Henderson and Vedral [2] to quantify the degree of non-classicality in a bipartite system. It is defined as the minimal distance
of the system state to a classical state with respect to one subsystem, that is, to a state with zero quantum discord [3]. It is also of interest for
applications in irreversible dynamical processes to determine the closest classical state(s) to a given state. We will review in this talk some recent
results on the geometric discord and closest classical states when the distance on the set of quantum states is either the Bures or the quantum
Hellinger distance. For pure states, the corresponding discords reduce to known entanglement-monotone measures. For mixed states, the discord
with Bures distance coincides with the optimal success probability of an ambiguous quantum state discrimination task [4]. We will show some
general relations and inequalities between the discords for the Bures, quantum Hellinger, and Hilbert-Schmidt distances and argue that analytical
explicit expressions can be obtained at least when the measured subsystem is a qubit [5, 6].
References:
[1] H. Ollivier and W.H. Zurek, Phys. Rev. Lett. 88, 017901 (2001)
[2] L. Henderson and V. Vedral, J. Phys. A 34, 6899 (2001)
[3] B. Dakic, V. Vedral, and C. Brukner, Phys. Rev. Lett 105, 190502 (2010)
[4] D. Spehner and M. Orszag, New Journal of Physics 15, 103001 (2013)
[5] D. Spehner and M. Orszag, J. Phys. A: Math. Theor. 47, 035302 (2014)
[6] W. Roga, S.M. Giampaolo, D. Spehner, and F. Illuminati, in preparation.
Thu 9:20
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Quantum Optics VII, 27-31 October 2014, Mar del Plata, ARGENTINA
Surprises in the Quantum-Classical Connection for Chaotic Systems
Arjendu Pattanayak,
Department of Physics and Astronomy, Carleton College, Northfield
I will report on several recent results that show surprises in the Quantum-Classical connection for chaotic systems, including in particular (a) the
existence of chaos demonstrated via computed Lyapunov exponents for quantum systems with classically regular counterparts and (b) demonstration
that the entanglement behavior of a 2-qubit system can display complete correspondence with the classical phase-space.
Thu 9:40
Ignorance is bliss: General and robust cancellation of decoherence via no-knowledge
quantum feedback
Andre Carvalho,
The Australian National University
A “no-knowledge” measurement of an open quantum system yields no information about any system observable; it only returns noise input from the
environment. Surprisingly, measuring nothing is most advantageous. We prove that a system undergoing no-knowledge monitoring has reversible
noise, which can be cancelled by directly feeding back the measurement signal. We show how no-knowledge feedback control can be used to
cancel decoherence in an arbitrary quantum system coupled to a Markovian reservoir that is being monitored. Since no-knowledge feedback does
not depend on the system state or Hamiltonian, such decoherence cancellation is guaranteed to be general, robust and can operate in conjunction
with any other quantum control protocol.
Thu 10:00
Which-state information for non-orthogonal states
Karen Fonseca,
Universidad Nacional de Colombia
It has been theoretically and experimentally demonstrated that it is possible to obtain partial knowledge of interference and incomplete which-state
information. Duality relations quantify how much can we learn about these complementary characteristics. Moreover, as shown by the so-called
triality relations, incomplete one-particle information is compatible with incomplete two-particle information. The states which are contrasted
to obtain which-state information are assumed to be orthogonal. What happens if they are non-orthogonal? In this contribution, we propose
operationally inspired measures of interference and which-path information for non-orthogonal states.
Thu 10:35
Towards quantum cybernetics
Rebecca Schmidt,
The University of Nottingham
For reliable quantum devices, effective regulation of open quantum systems is vital. In particular, a profound understanding of the interplay between
the environment and the regulation is crucial. In this context, it has been shown, that environment and regulation need not to be antagonistic, but
their interaction exhibits cooperative effects. To examine the underlying principles of (self-) regulation in open quantum systems, we reformulate
the regulation process in terms of quantum information theory. We investigate the role quantum correlations play in this setting. This also addresses
the question, how quantum correlations can be exploited to reach the thermodynamic limits of regulation.
Thu 10:55
Statistical properties of photons propagating through resonant vapours
Marcos Oriá,
Universidade Federal da Paraiba
The statistical properties of photons are a subject of interest for their importance in studies of radiation propagation and interaction with matter.
Here we are interested in the statistical properties of a field propagating through a resonant atomic vapor and we present an analysis of the spatial
distribution of intensity of a Gaussian beam or of a speckle pattern scattered by a resonant thermal vapor of Rb atoms.
Thu 10:35
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Quantum Optics VII, 27-31 October 2014, Mar del Plata, ARGENTINA
Quantum Contextuality in a Young interference experiment
Sebastião de Pádua,
Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Departamento de Física. Belo Horizonte - Brasil
We show that the correlations between the detector positions at the two-photon Young interference plane exhibit contextual behaviour. Contextuality
is demonstrated by showing the violation of the n-cycle noncontextuality inequalities [Phys. Rev. A 88 022118 (2013)] for any even number n of
observables ranging from 4 to 14. These violations exclude noncontextual hidden variables theories as explanation of the conditional two-photon
Young pattern. Unlike recent contextuality experiments, ours is free of the compatibility loophole.
Thu 10:55
Towards solid state quantum optical devices
Marcelo França Santos,
Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais
The recent development in micro- and nano-fabrication has taken solid state systems well within the realm of the few emitter/photon quantum
optics, with promising technological consequences. One of the main features of this "solid state quantum optics" is the possibility to integrate in
complex arrangements light channels, controllable emitters and detectors, non-linear gates and interactions, light rectifiers and so on, aiming at a
quantum optical equivalent to the electronic revolution of last century. 1-D systems such as quantum dots or NV-Centers in nanowires or photonic
crystal waveguides are particularly good candidates for quantum optical integrated photonics. In this talk we will explore the peculiarities of such
systems to discuss standard quantum optical and quantum informational concepts ranging from rectification of classical light and single photon
stimulated emission to entanglement production and protection, quantum state cloning and quantum simulation and computation.
Thu 11:15
Steering many-body quantum dynamics
Tommaso Calarco,
Institute of Quantum Information Processing, University of Ulm
Quantum technologies are based on the manipulation of individual degrees of freedom of quantum systems with exquisite precision. Achieving
this in a real environment requires pushing to the limits the ability to control the dynamics of quantum systems of increasing complexity.Optimal
control techniques are known to enable steering the dynamics of few-body systems in order to prepare a desired state or perform a desired unitary
transformation. I will present a recently developed optimal control method that allows doing so for a many-body quantum system undergoing e.g. a
quantum phase transition in the non-adiabatic regime.This opens the way to a range of applications, from the suppression of defects in a superfluidMott-insulator transition with ultra-cold atoms in an optical lattice to the achievement of various quantum gates at the quantum speed limit.I will
present detailed calculations we performed for different experimental scenario, together with the corresponding results obtained by experimental
groups in different fields, from cold atoms to spin squeezing in atomic ensembles and diamond NV centers.Our control method also allows for
exploring more general questions like the complexity of reversing quantum many-body dynamics, steering it back to its initial state even without
the ability to revert the sign of the whole Hamiltonian. I will conclude by showing some recent results we obtained in this context, as well as further
questions opened by our investigations.
Thu 11:15
Strong Atom-Photon Interactions in Nano-Photonic Lattices
Jeff Kimble,
California Institute of Technology
New paradigms for the interaction of light and matter emerge by localizing ultra-cold atoms in one and two-dimensional nano-photonic lattices. The
tremendous flexibility for modal and dispersion engineering of nano-photonic structures enables practical platforms for both trapping atoms and
designing their optical interactions in ways that surpass the limitations of current technologies. Explorations of quantum many-body physics with
photon-mediated atom-atom interactions in 1D and 2D lattices thereby become possible. In a complementary fashion, a new regime of many-body
physics with photons is opened by way of strong photon-photon interactions mediated by the underlying lattice of atoms. My presentation will
describe progress in the quest to create a new future for light-matter interactions distinct from conventional settings in modern physics. An overview
can be obtained at the following link: http://quantumfrontiers.com/2014/02/10/a-quantum-adventure/.
Thu 14:00
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Quantum Optics VII, 27-31 October 2014, Mar del Plata, ARGENTINA
Information in photons that are never detected
Anton Zeilinger,
University of Vienna, Austrian Academy of Sciences
In a recent experiment [1], we demonstrated that it is possible to obtain an image of an object by passing photons which are never detected. The
image is obtained by a detector in an entangled photon path. The crucial point is that it is the mere non-availability or availability of path information
in the first photon which decides whether the image appears for the second one. This is to be contrasted with ghost imaging, where one has to
obtain detection on both photons. From a fundamental point of view, the experiment demonstrates that it is the non-availability or availability of
information which decides whether or not interference appears, and not whether an observer takes note of that information or not.
References
[1] Gabriela B. Lemos, Victoria Borish, Garrett D. Cole, Sven Ramelow, Radek Lapkiewicz & Anton Zeilinger, Quantum Imaging with Undetected
Photons, arXiv:1401.4318 [quant-ph] (2014).
Thu 14:45
Squeezing and cubic phase gates and the related technologies
Akira Furusawa,
The University of Tokyo
I will show our research activities toward the realization of universal optical quantum information processing.
Thu 15:30
Ion crystals for quantum computing, simulation and non-equilibrium physics
Ferdinand Schmidt-Kaler,
QUANTUM Institut für Physik, Universität Mainz, Deutschland
The internal and external state of ion crystals is among the most controlled quantum systems. Also crystal structures in a Paul trap are controlled
with high precision using dynamic and the static electric potentials. Alternative to the approach which small linear crystals, shuttled in micro trap
arrays [1], and as pioneered by Dave Wineland [2] we aim for planar crystal structures of many ions and investigate this structural transition [3] also
under non-equilibrium conditions [4]. Quantum magnetic simulations may be realized using off-resonant laser beams and state-dependent forces
[5] leading to frustrated spin-spin interactions. An alternative and novel approach is the use of specific properties of Rydberg excitations for trapped
ion crystals [6]. In a cold 40-Ca+ ion we report the excitation from the D5/2 to the n=54 Rydberg state using 121 nm radiation. We have investigated
also mixed crystals containing single and doubly ionized Ca for mode design and the observation of structural configuration changes [7].
References
[1] PRL 109, 080501 (2012), arxiv.org:1403.0097, arxiv:1312.4156
[2] Science 325, 1227 (2009), PRL 109, 080501 (2012)
[3] PRL 109, 263003 (2012)
[4] Nat. Comm. 4, 2290 (2013)
[5] NJP 14, 093042 (2012), PRL 107, 207209 (2011), PRL 108, 235701 (2012)
[6] NJP 13, 075014 (2011), NJP 10 093009 (2008)
[7] Appl. Phys. B 114, 11 (2014), PRL 108, 023003 (2012), PRA 87, 052304 (2013)
Fri 9:00
Two-dimensional spectroscopy for the study of ion Coulomb crystals
Cecilia Cormick,
Ulm University
Ion Coulomb crystals are currently establishing themselves as a highly controllable test-bed for mesoscopic systems of statistical mechanics. The
detailed experimental interrogation of the dynamics of these crystals however remains an experimental challenge. In this work, we show how to
extend the concepts of multi-dimensional nonlinear spectroscopy to the study of the dynamics of ion Coulomb crystals. The scheme we present
can be realized with state-of-the-art technology and gives direct access to the dynamics, revealing nonlinear couplings even in systems with many
ions and in the presence of thermal excitations. We illustrate the advantages of our proposal showing how two-dimensional spectroscopy can be
used to detect signatures of a structural phase transition of the ion crystal, as well as resonant energy exchange between modes. Furthermore, we
demonstrate in these examples how different decoherence mechanisms can be identified.
Fri 9:45
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Quantum Optics VII, 27-31 October 2014, Mar del Plata, ARGENTINA
Decoherent time-dependent transport beyond Landauer-Büttiker: a Quantum Drift
alternative to Quantum Jumps
Horacio Pastawski,
Instituto de Física Enrique Gaviola y Facultad de Matemática, Astronomía y Física, Universidad Nacional de Córdoba
We develop and implement a model for including decoherent processes in the quantum dynamics undelying time-dependent transport. The model
is inspired in a dynamical formulation of the Landauer-Büttiker equations and boils down into a form of wave function that undergoes a smooth
stochastic drift. Thus, decoherence arises from a random perturbation of the environment in a local basis. This is, by construction, more efficient
than density matrix approaches. Using numerical calculations, we probe the equivalence among our dynamical model and the decoherent steady
state transport through the resonant state |0 of a quantum dot that undergoes decoherence through contact with a voltage probe. We also apply
this model to a two level system (TLS) that oscillates among |0 ≡ |↑↓ and |1 ≡ |↓↑ . We show that our model recovers not only the exponential
damping of the oscillations in the low perturbation regime, but also the bifurcation of the decoherence rates at a critical perturbation. Thus, our
Quantum Drift model is able to show the quantum dynamical phase transition produced by the interaction with the environment. We perform the
Loschmidt echo (LE) calculations to evaluate the decoherence in the TLS. We find that the pure states |0 ≡ |↑↓ and |1 ≡ |↓↑ are quite robust
√
against the local perturbation. In contrast, the LE decays faster when the system is in a superposition state (|↑↓ ± |↓↑ )/ 2. These results are in
agreement with the general trend recently observed in spin systems through NMR. that oscillates among j0i j"i and j1i j"i. We show that our model
recovers not only the exponential damping of the oscillations in the low perturbation regime, but also the bifurcation of the decoherence rates at
a critical perturbation. Thus, our Quantum Drift model is able to show the quantum dynamical phase transition produced by the interaction with
the environment. We perform the Loschmidt echo (LE) calculations to evaluate the decoherence in the TLS. We against the local perturbation. In
contrast, the LE decays faster when the system is in a superposition state (j"i j"i) = through NMR. p 2. These results are in agreement with the
general trend recently observed in spin systems.
Fri 10:30
Estimating the strength of a Force with noisy two-level quantum systems in the
Heisenberg limit
Bruno de Moura Escher,
Instituto de Física. Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro. Brazil.
We propose a protocol of estimation and a strategy of measurement for estimating the strength of a Forcewith N + 1 two-level quantum systems.
The statistical uncertainty in the estimation that is reached with thisprotocol is proportional to 1 = N -Heisenberg limit in absence of noise- even in
presence of some kind ofnoisy Forces. This limit overcomes the standard one, which is proportional to 1/N 1/2 . The protocol isengineered with (i)
N quantum probes (two-level quantum systems) that allow one to ascertain the strengthof the unknown Force; (ii) an auxiliary two-level quantum
system, which is robust (immune) to noisy effectsand also to the unknownForce; (iii) a known Force that modifies the dynamics of the probes and
should be calibrated throughout theexperiment; and (iv) suitable measurements of observables. The protocol presented advances the possibilityto
enhance the sensitivity in measuring magnetic fields with atomic quantum probes in presence of noisymagnetic fields, which is perpendicular to
the one that we wish to estimate.The protocol is supported by analytical calculations, which are based on lower –and upper– limits to thestatistical
uncertainty of estimation. Both the quantum limit and the standard limit to the uncertainty areexplicitly obtained, since, for each one of them, the
lower bound proposed is equal to the upper bound. Itavoids the limitations of numerical approaches. The calculations also allow one to establish a
lower bound tothe resources that are necessary for calibrating properly the external Force. Therefore, it shows theoreticallythat the present scheme
of measurement can be experimentally viable. Moreover, our results show thatnoisy Forces that are parallel to the one that we want to estimate are
more invasive to the process ofestimation than perpendicular noisy Forces.
Fri 11:05
Two novel applications of entanglement: compressing 3 qubits into 2, and making
1 photon act like 100
Aephraim Steinberg,
University of Toronto
I will present two recent experiments making use of photon entanglement for two very different tasks. In one, we show that all the information
about an ensemble of N identically prepared qubits (such as one might use in tomography) may be compressed into log(N + 1) qubits. Given a
limited-size quantum memory, this would enable one to more efficiently use the initial ensemble to make predictions about future measurements,
relative to simply carrying out tomography and storing the resulting classical information. In the second experiment, we demonstrate a cold-atombased optical nonlinearity which weakly entangles a single-photon-level beam with a coherent-state probe. We observe the phase shift due to single
postselected photons, and show that “weak-value amplification” can lead to effective photon numbers much larger than 1, as manifested in measured
phase shifts much larger than the single-photon value.
Fri 11:25
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Quantum Optics VII, 27-31 October 2014, Mar del Plata, ARGENTINA
Many-body quantum dynamics and phases of driven two-level atoms coupled via
a chiral bath
Peter Zoller,
Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of Innsbruck, and
Institute for Quantum Optics and Quantum Information (IQOQI) of the Austrian Academy of Sciences,
Innsbruck, Austria
Quantum Optics allows the realization of unique and unconventional quantum many body systems, and thus novel scenarios of quantum dynamics
and phases for the formation of strongly correlated quantum states. Here we will be interested in the many-body dynamics and phases of driven
two-level systems, which are coupled to, and interact via a “chiral 1D wave guide” representing a quantum reservoir [1,2]. By “chirality” we mean
that there is a asymmetry to generate left and right-moving excitations in the bath from the decay of the two-level atoms. We will derive a quantum
optical master equation for this spin-chain, eliminating the chiral reservoir in a Born-Markov approximation [1]. Remarkably, this master equation
predicts a steady state as a “pure state” in the form of quantum spin-dimers, where pairs of neighboring spins decouple by quantum interference
from the remainder of the chain. This “cooling” to quantum spin-dimers is the generic steady state for a wide range of parameters, providing an
example for “quantum magnetism by dissipation”.Quantum optical implementation of the driven dissipative spin-chain coupled to a chiral reservoir
are provided first of all by two-level emitters coupled (strongly) to a fiber, or photonic band gap material, as discussed in [3,4]. Another realization
is with a two-species mixture of atomic quantum gases [1], where the reservoir is represented by a spin-orbit coupled 1D quasi-condensate of atoms
in a magnetized phase, while the spins are are identified with motional states of atoms in an optical lattice.
References
[1] T. Ramos, H. Pichler, A. Daley, and P. Zoller, unpublished
[2] K. Stannigel, P. Rabl and P. Zoller, New J. Phys. 14, 063014 (2012).
[3] R. Mitsch, C. Sayrin, B. Albrecht, P. Schneeweiss and A. Rauschenbeutel, arXiv:1406.0896 (2014).
[4] I. Söllner, S. Mahmoodian, A. Javadi and P. Lodahl, arXiv:1406.4295 (2014).
Fri 12:10
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Quantum Optics VII, 27-31 October 2014, Mar del Plata, ARGENTINA
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Quantum Optics VII, 27-31 October 2014, Mar del Plata, ARGENTINA
P OSTER C ONTRIBUTIONS
All posters will be exhibited simultaneously at Salón Juan de Garay (level 1).
Posters with odd numbers will be discussed at Poster Session 1, (Wednesday,
15:45).
Posters with even numbers will be discussed at Poster Session 2, (Thursday, 16:15)
Poster #
1. What we talk about when we talk about non-Markovianity, Carole Addis, Heriot-Watt University, Edinburgh.
2. Linear-optical simulation of the cooling of a cluster-state Hamiltonian system, Gabriel Aguilar, Universidade
Federal de Rio de Janeiro.
3. Direct Measurement of Photonic Spatial Correlations, Jessica Oliveira de Almeida, UFRJ (Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro).
4. Distributions of orbital angular momentum and topological charge in shaped optical vortices, Anderson Amaral,
Universidade Federal de Pernambuco.
5. Applying the Simplest Kochen-Specker Set for Quantum Information Processing, Mauricio Arias, CEFOP and
Universidad de Concepción.
6. Experimental realization of arbitrary, partially polarized states of light, Diego Eduardo Barberena Helfer and
Diego Giancarlo Gatti Alvarez, Pontificia Universidad Católica del Perú.
7. Excited-state phase transitions in the Dicke model: comparative quantum and semiclassical analysis, Miguel
Angel Bastarrachea Magnani, Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México.
8. Quantum correlations from classically correlated states, Guido Bellomo, Instituto de Física La Plata (IFLP) CONICET.
9. From local to global Loschmidt echo in many-body systems, Denise Bendersky and Pablo René Zangara,
Instituto de Física Enrique Gaviola (UNC - CONICET). Facultad de Matemática, Astronomía y Física (UNC).
10. Light scattering of an NV center, Ralf Betzholz, Theoretische Physik, Universität des Saarlandes, Saarbrücken,
Germany.
11. Generalized entropic uncertainty relations for positive operator-valued measures, Gustavo Martin Bosyk,
Instituto de Física La Plata.
12. Thermal light cannot be represented as a mixture of random pulses, Agata Branczyk, Perimeter Institute for
Theoretical Physics.
13. Optimised shaping of optical nonlinearities in poled crystals, Agata Branczyk, Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics.
14. Double-herald single-photon absorption by a single atom, Jose Brito, Saarland University.
15. Charge state conversion dynamics in nitrogen-vacancy centre ensembles, Kathrin Buczak, Vienna University
of Technology Institute of Atomic and Subatomic Physics. Vienna, Austria. Quantum-Atom-Optics Group.
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Quantum Optics VII, 27-31 October 2014, Mar del Plata, ARGENTINA
16. Experimental demonstration of computational speed-up with a single ququart, Baris Cakmak, Sabanci University.
17. Coupling Different Degrees of Freedom of a Single Photon, Omar Calderón Losada, Universidad de los Andes,
Bogotá, Colombia.
18. Evolution of entanglement between two harmonic modes in stable and unstable regimes, Norma Canosa, Departamento de Física, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, Universidad Nacional de La Plata, IFLP- CONICET, La
Plata, Argentina.
19. Experimental implementation of an eight-dimensional Kochen-Specker set and observation of its connection
with the Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger theorem, Gustavo Cañas, Center for optics and photonics (CEFOP) and
Universidad de Concepción.
20. Work as a POVM, Federico Cerisola, University of Buenos Aires.
21. Study of the evolution of the spectral profile of light propagating in a resonant atomic vapor, Martine Chevrollier,
Universidade Federal da Paraíba-Brazil.
22. Detuning-control of Exciton Entanglement in two Quantum Dots coupled to a Photonic Mode, Gustavo Cipagauta,
Universidad de Colombia.
23. New definition of the polariton ladder operators leads to interesting detuning dependent effects., Raúl Coto,
Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Chile.
24. Coherence and dephasing spectroscopy through single-photon absorption in molecular matter-wave interferometry, Joseph Cotter, University of Vienna Faculty of Physics, VCQ/QuNaBioS, Vienna, Austria.
25. Entanglement between cavity and detector in Dynamical Casimir Effect, Antonio de Castro, Universidade
estadual de Ponta Grossa.
26. Driving at the maximal speed limit with dynamic Landau-Zener Hamiltonians, Bruno de Moura Escher, Instituto de Física. Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro. Brazil.
27. Post-selection induced Entanglement is at the origin of the quantum Cheshire cat, Antonino Di Lorenzo, Universidade Federal de Uberlândia.
28. Initial entanglement between detectors allows violating Heisenberg’s uncertainty relations, Antonino Di Lorenzo,
Universidade Federal de Uberlândia.
29. Irreversible decoherence of dipole interacting nuclear spins coupled with a phonon bath, Federico Domínguez,
IFEG – CONICET; Facultad de Matemática, Astronomía y Física – Universidad Nacional de Córdoba.
30. Quantum emission and control on circuit cavity electrodynamics, Santiago Echeverri Arteaga, Departamento
Física, Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Bogotá D.C., Colombia.
31. One atom laser via phonon assisted cavity feeding, Santiago Echeverri Arteaga, Universidad Nacional de
Colombia - Bogotá, Facultad de Ciencias, Departamento de Fíisica, Grupo de Óptica e Información Cuántica,
Bogotá, Colombia.
32. Effects of the one-photon and two-photon cavity losses on quantum correlations of two-qubit system, Vitalie
Eremeev, Facultad de Ingeniería, Universidad Diego Portales, Santiago, Chile.
33. Many-particle entanglement and phase coherence in mesoscopic Bose-Einstein condensates, Matteo Fadel,
University of Basel.
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Quantum Optics VII, 27-31 October 2014, Mar del Plata, ARGENTINA
34. Quantum friction: a microscopic approach based on the effective action, María Belén Farías, Departamento
de Física - FCEyN - UBA and IFIBA (Instituto de Física de Buenos Aires).
35. Quantum vampire: action at a distance of the photon annihilation operator, Ilya Fedorov, Russian Quantum
Center, Skolkovo, Moscow, Russia.
36. Quantum Drift Model for Decoherence in Dynamical Transport: a wave function approach., Lucas Fernández,
Instituto de Física Enrique Gaviola (IFEG) -CONICET. Facultad de Matemática, Astronomía y Física (FaMAF)
-UNC.
37. Interface between path and OAM entanglement for high-dimensional photonic quantum information, Robert
Fickler, University of Vienna / Institute for Quantum Optics and Quantum Information.
38. Device-Independent Certification of High-Dimensional Quantum Systems, Johanna Figueroa Barra, Centro
de Óptica y Fotónica - CEFOP. Universidad de Concepción.
39. Open harmonic networks and the cubic eigenvalue problem, Nahuel Freitas, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y
Naturales. Universidad de Buenos Aires.
40. Experimental sequential discrimination of quantum states for multi-party communications, Pablo Gonzaléz,
Center for Optics and Photonics (CEFOP) and Universidad de Concepción..
41. Tunable photon statistics: a new approach for mixed light consisting of semiconductor-based ultra-broadband
amplified spontaneous emission and coherent laser light, Sébastien Hartmann, Semiconductor Optics Group.
Institute of Applied Physics. Technical University Darmstadt. Darmstadt-Germany.
42. Quantum and Classical Nonlinear Optics in Waveguides in the Presence of Scattering Loss, Lukas Helt, Centre
for Ultrahigh bandwidth Devices for Optical Systems (CUDOS), MQ Photonics Research Centre, Department
of Physics and Astronomy, Macquarie University, Australia.
43. Long coherence times for Rydberg qubits on a superconcducting atom chip, Carla Hermann Avigliano, CEFOP
Center for Optics and Photonics. Laboratoire Kastler Brossel - CNRS.
44. Classicalization and Lyapunov Exponents, Luis Nicolás Hernández Camacho, Universidad Nacional de Colombia.
45. Smallest set for non-Markovian dynamics in collisional models, Nadja Kolb Bernardes, Physics Department,
Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Brazil.
46. Wigner-Yanase skew information in quantum critical spin chains, Goktug Karpat, Universidade Estadual
Paulista - UNESP.
47. Noisy Quantum Teleportation, Laura Knoll, CEILAP-CITEDEF. DF-FCEyN-UBA.
48. Generation and confirmation of a (100 x 100)-dimensional entangled quantum system, Mario Krenn, Vienna
Center for Quantum Science and Technology, Faculty of Physics, University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria.
49. Synchronizing Photons with a Binary Division Strategy, Miguel Larotonda, CEILAP (CITEDEF-CONICET),
Argentina.
50. Solitons in PT-symmetric nonlinear dissipative gratings, Xiang Li, College of physics, Northwest University,
Xi’an, China.
51. Quantum limit for estimation of weak classical forces via a noisy harmonic oscillator, Camille Lombard
Latune, Instituto de Física - Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro.
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Quantum Optics VII, 27-31 October 2014, Mar del Plata, ARGENTINA
52. A fiber-based and polarization encoded Quantum Key Distribution practical device, Ignacio H. López Grande,
División Óptica Cuántica, DEILAP-CITEDEF. Departamento de Física, FCEyN-UBA.
53. Low cost ECDL and control toolkit for Rb hyperfine interaction, Marcelo Luda, DEILAP-CITEDEF. Physics
Department of FCEN-UBA. Argentina.
54. A three-particle, three-dimensonal GHZ state using twisted photons, Mehul Malik, Zeilinger Research Group,
Institute for Quantum Optics and Quantum Information, Austrian Academy of Sciences, Vienna, Austria.
55. Correlation spectroscopy in Cold Atoms: Dynamical regime and detecting sidebands-carrier correlation in EIT
condition, Hans Marin Florez, Universidade de São Paulo.
56. Scalable Source of Multipartite Continuous Variable Entangled Beams of Light, Alberto Marino, University of
Oklahoma.
57. Quantum computations on a topologically encoded qubit, Esteban Martinez, University of Innsbruck.
58. Estimating Quantum Correlations in Dimerized Spin Systems Through a Correlated Mean Field Approach,
Juan Mauricio Matera, IFLP -CONICET/Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, Universidad Nacional de La Plata,
Departamento de Ciencias Básicas, Facultad de Ingeniería, Universidad Nacional de La Plata.
59. Continuous-Variable Bicolor Entanglement for Quantum Teleportation, Renné Medeiros de Araújo, LMCAL,
São Paulo.
60. Quantum Characterizations of Photon Number Resolving Detectors, Griselda Mingolla, INTI.
61. Distributing entanglement with separable states, Ladislav Mista, Department of Optics, Palacky University,
Olomouc, Czech Republic.
62. A Rydberg Probe for Short-Range BEC Density Correlations, Mark Mitchison, Imperial College London,
University of Oxford, Universitat Ulm.
63. Engineered atom-light interactions in 1D photonic crystals, Juan Andrés Muniz, California Institute of Technology.
64. Entanglement characteristics of few-particle trapped systems, Anna Okopinska, Institute of Physics, Jan
Kochanowski University.
65. Quantum memory based on electromagnetically induced transparency in optical cavities, Rommel Oliveira,
Universidade Federal de São Carlos (UFSCar).
66. Optomechanical description of Dynamical Casimir effect, Belter Ernesto Ordaz Mendoza, University of Connecticut.
67. Eigenvalue density phases of a two dimensional quantum spin system, Carlos Pineda, Instituto de Fisica, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México.
68. Spin conservation in bicircular high harmonic generation, Emilio Pisanty, Imperial College London.
69. Proposed application of the neutral Nitrogen-Vacancy center in diamond as an optically controllable quantum
light-matter interface, Eilon Poem, Clarendon Laboratory, Oxford University, Oxford, United Kingdom.
70. Maximum population transfer in a periodically driven quantum system, Pablo Poggi, Departamento de Física
Juan José Giambiagi & IFIBA CONICET - UBA.
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Quantum Optics VII, 27-31 October 2014, Mar del Plata, ARGENTINA
71. Control of open quantum systems and the quantum speed limit, Pablo Poggi, Departamento de Física Juan José
Giambiagi & IFIBA CONICET - UBA.
72. Scalable Quantum State Engineering with Trapped Ions, Ulrich Poschinger, Universität Mainz.
73. Time ordering effects in the generation of entangled photons using nonlinear optical processes, Nicolas Quesada,
Department of Physics, University of Toronto.
74. Quantum Interference of N photons in a Mach-Zehnder Interferometer, Nadia Ramírez, Facultad de Ciencias,
Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México.
75. Properties and control of a hybrid qubit based on a double quantum dot, Alba Ramos, FaMAF- Facultad de
Matemática, Astronomía y Física. IFEG- Intituto de Física Enrique Gaviola..
76. Non-Gaussianity for the two-photon spatial state of SPDC using Hermite-Gaussian pump beams, Lorena
Rebón, Instituto de Física de La Plata -CONICET. Departamento de Ciencias Básicas, Facultad de Ingeniería,
Universidad Nacional de La Plata.
77. Theoretical study of the interaction between two polariton condensates in the presence of a magnetic field,
Juan Sebastián Rojas Arias, Universidad Nacional de Colombia. Grupo de Óptica e Información Cuántica,
Universidad Nacional de Colombia.
78. Generalized conditional entropy in quantum systems, Raúl Rossignoli, Departamento de Física - IFLP and
Facultad de Ingeniería, Universidad Nacional de La Plata - CIC.
79. Open Quantum System Approach for the Non-Equilibrium Casimir Effect, Adrian Ezequiel Rubio Lopez,
Departamento de Física Juan Jose Giambiagi & IFIBA CONICET-UBA.
80. Optimal Control of Effective Hamiltonians, Łukasz Rudnicki, Freiburg Insitute for Advanced Studies, AlbertLudwigs University of Freiburg, Freiburg, Germany.
81. Image Formation and Angular Spectrum Transfer in Non-degenerate Stimulated Down-conversion, Jaqueline
Sales, Laboratório de Óptica Quântica (LOQ), Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ).
82. Testing magnetic a decoherence-free subspace and its limits, Christian Schmiegelow, JGU - Uni-Mainz.
83. Projection operators in the theory of open quantum systems, Vitalii Semin, University of KwaZulu-Natal,
Durban, South Africa.
84. Non-Gaussian state generation certified by the EPR-steering inequality, Esteban Sepulveda, Center for Optics
and Photonics, Universidad de Concepcion.
85. Observing non-equilibrium quantum thermodynamics features in a reliable way, Roberto Serra, Universidade
Federal do ABC.
86. Universal definition of Markovianity for open systems, Ilya Sinayskiy, National Institute for Theoretical Physics
and School of Chemistry and Physics, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Durban, South Africa.
87. Multipartite quantum eraser in cavity QED, Leonardo Souza, Federal University of Viçosa - Campus Florestal
- Brazil.
88. Study of the entanglement properties of a system of interacting quantum dots embedded in an optical microcavity, Daniel Gustavo Suárez Forero, Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Bogotá-Colombia.
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Quantum Optics VII, 27-31 October 2014, Mar del Plata, ARGENTINA
89. Generation of geometric phases in polarization-path entangled states, Elmer Eduardo Suarez Yana, Pontificia
Universidad Católica del Perú.
90. Accessing multi-dimensional entanglement via discrete measurements on mutually unbiased bases of a bipartite
continuous variable system, Daniel Tasca, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro.
91. Homodyne vs Heterodyne for Gaussian States, Yong Siah Teo, Department of Optics, Palacky University.
92. Atomic squeezing in CQE systems, Diego Tielas, Department of Physics, University of La Plata, La Plata,
Argentina, Faculty of Engineering, University of La Plata, Argentina.
93. Quantum interference with SPDC photons: The roles of pump beam waist, detection mode, and longitudinal
crystal position, Nora Tischler, ARC Center for Engineered Quantum Systems, Department of Physics and
Astronomy, Macquarie University, Sydney, Australia.
94. Achieving single-photon nonlinearities with an intracavity Rydberg medium, Imam Usmani, Institut d’Optique
Graduate School, Palaiseau, France.
95. Entanglement distribution in decoherence channels, Andrea Valdés Hernández, Instituto de Física, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brazil.
96. Polarization entanglement generation by interference of two squeezed states using Rubidium vapor, Paulo
Valente, Facultad de Ingeniería, Universidad de la República, Montevideo, Uruguay.
97. Efficient generation of high dimension photonic states, Juan José Miguel Varga, Laboratorio de Procesado de
Imágenes, Departamento de Física, FCEyN, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Buenos Aires, Argentina.
98. Quantum Speed Limit for relativistic electron in an uniform magnetic field, David Velasco Villamizar, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, Brazil.
99. Joint estimation of phase and phase diffusion for quantum metrology, Mihai Vidrighin, Imperial College London.
100. Nonlinear optics with atomic mercury vapor inside a hollow-core photonic crystal fiber, Ulrich Vogl, Max
Planck Institute for the Science of Light.
101. Entangling mechanical oscillators: measurement-based and coherent feedback approaches, Matthew Woolley,
UNSW Canberra.
102. Quantum Speed-Up of Field Evolution by Atomic Number in an Optical Cavity QED System, Burkley Patterson, University of Maryland Joint Quantum Institute (JQI).
103. Storage and manipulation of light by higher order nonlinearities in an atomic medium, Daniel Felinto, UFPE,
Brasil.
104. A scheme for efficient generation of mesoscopic field states superposition in cavity QED, Carla HermannAvigliano, Center for Optics and Photonics, Universidad de Concepción, Concepción, Chile.
105. Quantum metrological bounds for weak-value measurements, Nicim Zagury, Instituto de Física, Universidade
Federal do Rio de Janeiro.
106. Distribution of multipartite correlations, Jonas Maziero, Universidade Federal de Santa Maria.
107. Puzzles of the “Nonlinear” Ehrenfest Theorem for Solitons, Carlos Alberto Ramírez Medina, Universidad
Nacional Autónoma de México.
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Quantum Optics VII, 27-31 October 2014, Mar del Plata, ARGENTINA
108. Probing Macroscopic Realism via Ramsey Correlation measurements, Ali Asadian, Atominstitut, TU Wien.
109. Separable Schmidt modes of a non-separable state, Alessio Avella, INRIM, Optics Division. Torino, Italy.
110. Higher Order Entanglement in Raman Processes, Biswajit Sen, Vidyasagar Teachers’ Training College, Midnapore, India.
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Quantum Optics VII, 27-31 October 2014, Mar del Plata, ARGENTINA
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Quantum Optics VII, 27-31 October 2014, Mar del Plata, ARGENTINA
L IST OF PARTICIPANTS
•
Antonio Acín , ICFO-The Institute of Photonic Sci-
•
ences.
•
Carole Addis, Heriot-Watt University, Edinburgh.
•
Gabriel Aguilar, Universidade Federal de Rio de
omy, Hunter College of the City University of New
York, New York, USA.
•
•
Jessica Oliveira de Almeida, UFRJ (Universidade
•
Anderson Amaral, Universidade Federal de Per-
Janet Anders, University College, London.
•
Leandro Aolita, Freie Universität Berlin.
•
•
Gustavo Martín Bosyk, Instituto de Física La Plata.
•
Agata Branczyk, Perimeter Institute for Theoretical
Physics.
Mauricio Andrés Arias Contreras, CEFOP y Uni-
•
José Brito, Saarland University.
•
Kathrin Buczak, Vienna University of Technology.
versidad de Concepción.
•
•
Ali Asadian, Atominstitut, TU Wien.
Institute of Atomic and Subatomic Physics, Vienna,
Adriana Auyuanet, Instituto de Física, Facultad de
Austria. Quantum-Atom-Optics Group.
Ingeniería - Universidad de la República, Uruguay.
•
Alessio Avella, INRIM, Optics Division, Torino,
•
Adán Cabello, Universidad de Sevilla, España.
•
Baris Cakmak, Sabanci University.
•
Tomaso Calarco, Institute of Quantum Information
Italy.
•
Diego Eduardo Barberena Helfer, Pontificia Uni-
Processing. University of Ulm.
versidad Católica del Perú.
•
•
Gabriela Barreto Lemos, Institute of quantum opAcademy of Sciences (ÖAW).
•
Plata, IFLP- CONICET, La Plata, Argentina.
de Ciencias Nucleares, Universidad Nacional
Autónoma de México.
Ethel Beer, INTI, Argentina.
•
Guido Bellomo, Instituto de Física La Plata (IFLP)
•
Gustavo Cañas, Center for optics and photonics
(CEFOP) and Universidad de Concepción.
•
Andre Carvalho, The Australian National University.
- CONICET.
•
•
Norma Canosa, Departamento de Física, Facultad
de Ciencias Exactas, Universidad Nacional de La
Miguel Angel Bastarrachea Magnani, Instituto
•
Omar Calderón Losada, Universidad de los Andes,
Bogotá, Colombia.
tics and quantum information (IQOQI) - Austrian
•
Rainer Blatt, University of Innsbruck, Institute for
Experimental Physics.
nambuco.
•
Lorena Bianchet, DEILAP-CITEDEF, Departamento de Física ,FCEN-UBA. Argentina.
Federal do Rio de Janeiro).
•
Ralf Betzholz, Theoretische Physik, Universität des
Saarlandes, Saarbrücken, Germany.
Janeiro.
•
Janos Bergou, Department of Physics and Astron-
Denise Bendersky, -Instituto de Física Enrique
Federico Cerisola, Departamento de Física Juan
José Giambiagi & IFIBA CONICET - UBA.
Gaviola (IFEG) - CONICET, Argentina-Facultad
de Matemática, Astronomía y Física (FaMAF) -
•
Martine Chevrollier, Universidade Federal da
Paraíba-Brazil.
Universidad Nacional de Córdoba, Argentina.
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Quantum Optics VII, 27-31 October 2014, Mar del Plata, ARGENTINA
•
Gustavo Cipagauta, Departamento de Física - Uni-
•
•
•
Cecilia Cormick, Institute for Theoretical Physics,
Leonardo Ermann, Dto Física Teórica, GIyA,
CNEA. Buenos Aires, Argentina.
Ulm University, Germany.
•
Vitalie Eremeev, Facultad de Ingeniería, Universidad Diego Portales, Santiago, Chile.
versidad Nacional de Colombia .
•
Rodrigo Cortiñas, Laboratorio de Procesado de
Jürgen Eschner, Quantum Photonics.
Saarland
University, Germany.
Imágenes (LPI)- Departamento de Física- Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales- Universidad
•
Matteo Fadel , University of Basel.
•
Felipe Fanchini, São Paulo State University.
•
María Belén Farías, Departamento de Física -
de Buenos Aires.
•
Raúl Coto, Pontificia Universidad Católica de
Chile.
•
•
FCEyN - UBA, and IFIBA (Instituto de Física de
Buenos Aires).
Joseph Cotter, University of Vienna - Faculty of
Physics, VCQ/QuNaBioS, Vienna, Austria.
•
Moscow, Russia.
Luiz Davidovich, Instituto de Física, Universidade
Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, RJ,
•
Brazil.
•
Virginia Feldman, Facultad de Ingeniería, Universidad de la República.
Antonio Sérgio de Castro, Universidade Estadual
•
Daniel Felinto, Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, Recife, Brasil.
de Ponta Grossa. Departamento de Física.
•
Ilya Fedorov, Russian Quantum Center, Skolkovo,
•
Alberto de la Torre, Departamento de Física -
Lucas Fernández, Instituto de Física Enrique Gaviola (IFEG) - CONICET. Facultad de Matemática,
FCEyN - Universidad Nacional de Mar del Plata.
Astronomía y Física (FaMAF) -UNC.
•
Bruno de Moura Escher, Instituto de Física. Uni•
versidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro. Brazil.
Alessandro Ferraro, Queen’s University Belfast
(UK).
•
Sebastião de Pádua, Universidade Federal de Mi-
•
nas Gerais.
•
Quantum Optics and Quantum Information.
Aldo Delgado, Center for Optics and Photonics,
•
Universidad de Concepción, Chile.
•
Antonino Di Lorenzo, Universidade Federal de
•
Federico Dominguez, IFEG - CONICET, Facultad
•
Marcelo França Santos, Departamento de Física,
Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais.
Nacional de Córdoba.
•
Karen Fonseca, Departamento de Física, Universidad Nacional de Colombia.
de Matemática, Astronomía y Física - Universidad
•
Johanna Figueroa Barra, Centro de óptica y
Fotónica - CEFOP. Universidad de Concepción.
Uberlândia.
•
Robert Fickler, University of Vienna / Institute for
•
Nahuel Freitas, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y
Naturales. Universidad de Buenos Aires.
Martín Drechsler, Departamento de Física Juan
José Giambiagi & IFIBA CONICET - UBA.
•
Akira Furusawa, The University of Tokyo.
Santiago Echeverri Arteaga, Universidad Nacional
•
Ernesto Galvão, Instituto de Física, Universidade
de Colombia - Bogotá, Facultad de Ciencias, De-
Federal Fluminense (Brazil).
partamento de Fíisica, Grupo de óptica e Informa•
ción Cuántica, Bogotá, Colombia.
Mariano Garagiola,
Instituto de Física En-
rique Gaviola (UNC - CONICET). Facultad de
•
Jens Eisert, FU Berlin.
Matemática, Astronomía y Física (UNC).
38
Quantum Optics VII, 27-31 October 2014, Mar del Plata, ARGENTINA
•
Ignacio
García-Mata,
IFIMAR
(CONICET-
•
•
Nadja Kolb Bernardes, Physics Department, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Brazil.
UNMdP), Mar del Plata, Argentina.
•
Giancarlo Gatti Alvarez, Pontificia Universidad
Católica del Perú.
Mario Krenn, Vienna Center for Quantum Science
and Technology, Faculty of Physics, University of
Vienna, Vienna, Austria.
•
Pablo González, Center for Optics and Photonics
•
(CEFOP) and Universidad de Concepción.
Miguel
Larotonda,
CEILAP
(CITEDEF-
CONICET), Argentina.
•
Cecilia González, Facultad de Matemática, As-
•
tronomía y Física - Universidad Nacional de Cór-
and Technology and University of Colorado, and
doba.
•
Department of Physics, University of Colorado,
Boulder, USA.
Carlos Andrés González Arciniegas, Universidade
de São Paulo, Brazil.
•
•
Paul Lett, Joint Quantum Institute. National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg.
•
Gerd Leuchs, Max Planck Institute for the Science
Sébastien Hartmann, Semiconductor Optics Group,
Institute of Applied Physics. Technical University
Darmstadt. Darmstadt-Germany.
•
of Light, Erlangen, Germany.
Lucas Helt, Centre for Ultrahigh bandwidth De-
•
vices for Optical Systems (CUDOS), MQ Photonics
Arturo Lezama, Universidad de la República, Facultad de Ingeniería, Montevideo, Uruguay.
Research Centre, Department of Physics and As-
•
tronomy, Macquarie University, Australia.
•
Brian Lester, JILA, National Institute of Standards
Xiang Li, College of physics, Northwest University,
Xi’an, China.
Carla Hermann Avigliano, CEFOP Center for Op-
•
tics and Photonics - Laboratoire Kastler Brossel,
Camille Lombard Latune, Instituto de Física - Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro.
CNRS.
•
•
ultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad
de Colombia.
de Buenos Aires - Argentina.
•
Felipe Herrera, Harvard University.
•
Zdenek Hradil, Department of Optics, Palacky Uni-
•
Ignacio López Grande, División óptica Cuántica, DEILAP-CITEDEF. Departamento de Física,
FCEyN-UBA. Argentina.
versity Olomouc, Czech Republic.
•
•
Fernando Lombardo, Departamento de Fisica, Fac-
Luis Hernandez Camacho, Universidad Nacional
Osvaldo Jiménez Farías, Centro Brasileiro de
Marcelo Luda, DEILAP-CITEDEF, Departamento
de Física ,FCEN-UBA. Argentina.
Pesquisas Físicas.
•
•
•
for Quantum Optics and Quantum Information,
UNESP.
Austrian Academy of Sciences, Vienna, Austria.
Antonio Khoury, Universidade Federal Flumi-
•
nense. Instituto de Física. Niterói - RJ - Brasil.
Sabrina Maniscalco, Department of Physics and
Astronomy, University of Turku, Turku, Finland.
•
Hans Marin Florez, Universidade de São Paulo.
•
Alberto Marino, University of Oklahoma.
ico.
•
Esteban Martínez, University of Innsbruck.
Laura Knoll, CEILAP-CITEDEF. DF-FCEyN-
•
Eduardo Mascarenhas, Universidade Federal de
•
Jeff Kimble, California Institute of Technology.
•
Andrei Klimov, Universidad de Guadalajara, Mex-
•
Mehul Malik, Zeilinger Research Group, Institute
Goktug Karpat, Universidade Estadual Paulista -
Minas Gerais.
UBA, Argentina
39
Quantum Optics VII, 27-31 October 2014, Mar del Plata, ARGENTINA
•
Mauricio Andrés Matera, IFLP -CONICET/Facultad
de Ciencias Exactas, Universidad Nacional de La
•
Matteo Paris, University of Milano, ITALY.
•
Florencia Pascual-Winter, Centro Atómico Bar-
Plata, Departamento de Ciencias Básicas, Fac-
iloche & Instituto Balseiro. Bariloche, Argentina.
ultad de Ingeniería, Universidad Nacional de La
•
Plata.
Fernando Pastawski, California Institute of Technology.
•
Jonas Maziero, Universidade Federal de Santa
•
Maria.
Horacio Pastawski, Instituto de Física Enrique
Gaviola y Facultad de Matemática, Astronomía y
•
Dara McCutcheon, Technical University of Den-
Física, Universidad Nacional de Córdoba.
mark.
•
Arjendu Pattanayak, Department of Physics and
•
Renné Medeiros de Araújo, LMCAL, São Paulo.
•
Griselda Mingolla, INTI, Argentina.
•
Burkley Patterson, Joint Quantum Institute.
•
Ladislav Mista, Department of Optics, Palacky
•
Juan Pablo Paz, University of Buenos Aires.
•
Francesco Petruccione, School of Chemistry and
Astronomy, Carleton College, Northfield, USA.
University Olomouc.
•
•
Morgan Mitchell, ICFO-The Institute of Photonic
Sciences.
Physics, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Westville
Campus, Durban, South Africa.
Mark Mitchison, Imperial College London. University of Oxford. Universitat Ulm.
•
Oliver Pfister, University of Virginia.
•
Carlos Pineda, Instituto de Fisica, Universidad Na-
Christopher Monroe, JQI and University of Mary-
cional Autónoma de México.
land.
•
•
Juan Andrés Muniz, California Institute of Technol-
•
Emilio Pisanty, Imperial College London.
•
Martin Plenio, Institut of Theoretical Physics, Ulm
ogy.
•
University.
Ranieri Nery, Universidade Federal do Rio de
•
Janeiro.
•
Oxford University, Parks Road, Oxford, United
Kingdom.
Paulo Nussenzveig, Instituto de Física, Universidade de São Paulo.
•
•
Anna Okopinska,
•
Institute of Physics,
Kochanowski University.
•
Ulrich Poschinger, Universität Mainz.
Rommel Oliveira, Universidade Federal de São
•
Juan Quesada, Department of Physics, University
•
Belter Ordaz Mendoza, University of Connecticut.
•
Marcos Oria, Universidade Federal da Paraiba,
of Toronto.
•
Nadia Ramirez, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad
Nacional Autónoma de México.
Brazil.
•
Luisa Fernanda Ramirez, Universidad Nacional de
Colombia.
Miguel Orszag, Instituto de Física, Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Chile.
•
Pablo Poggi, Departamento de Física Juan José Giambiagi & IFIBA CONICET - UBA.
Jan
Carlos (UFSCar).
•
Eilon Poem-Kalogerakis, Clarendon Laboratory,
•
Carlos Alberto Ramírez Medina, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México.
Omar Osenda, Facultad de Matemática, Astronomía y Física - Universidad Nacional de Cór-
•
Alba Ramos, FaMAF- Facultad de Matemática, As-
doba, Instituto de Física Enrique Gaviola - Con-
tronomía y Física. IFEG- Intituto de Física Enrique
icet. Argentina.
Gaviola.
40
Quantum Optics VII, 27-31 October 2014, Mar del Plata, ARGENTINA
•
André Ranchin, Oxford University / Imperial Col-
•
•
•
Lorena Rebón, Instituto de Física de La Plata
-CONICET. Departamento de Ciencias Básicas,
•
Roberto Serra, Universidade Federal do ABC.
•
Ilya Sinayskiy, National Institute for Theoretical
Facultad de Ingeniería, Universidad Nacional de
Physics and School of Chemistry and Physics, Uni-
La Plata.
versity of KwaZulu-Natal, Durban, South Africa.
Juan Sebastián Rojas Arias, GOIC (Grupo de óp-
•
tica e Información Cuántica), Universidad Na-
•
Augusto Roncaglia, University of Buenos Aires.
•
Raul Rossignoli, Departamento de Física - IFLP
•
Joint
Leonardo Souza, Federal University of Viçosa Campus Florestal - Brazil.
•
Dominique Spehner, Institut Fourier and LPMMC,
Grenoble, France.
and Facultad de Ingeniería, Universidad Nacional
de La Plata - CIC.
•
Aephraim Steinberg, Department of Physics &
Centre for Quantum Information and Quantum
Adrian Rubio Lopez, Departamento de Física Juan
Control, University of Toronto.
Jose Giambiagi & IFIBA CONICET-UBA.
•
•
Pablo Solano, University of Maryland.
Quantum Institute (JQI).
cional de Colombia.
•
Esteban Sepúlveda, Center for Optics and Photonics, Universidad de Concepción.
lege, London.
Łukasz Rudnicki, Freiburg Insitute for Advanced
Daniel Suárez Forero, Universidad Nacional de
Colombia, Bogotá-Colombia.
Studies, Albert-Ludwigs University of Freiburg,
•
Freiburg, Germany.
Elmer Eduardo Suarez Yana, Pontificia Universidad Católica del Perú.
•
Jaqueline Sales, Laboratório de óptica Quântica
•
(LOQ), Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro
Janeiro.
(UFRJ).
•
•
Daniel Tasca, Universidade Federal do Rio de
María José Sanchez, Centro Atómico Bariloche and
Yong Siah Teo, Department of Optics, Palacky University.
Instituto Balseiro.
•
•
Marcelo
Terra
Cunha,
Departamento
de
Luis Sanchez-Soto, Universidad Complutense.
Matemática, Universidade Federal de Minhas
Madrid.
Gerais UFMG - Brazil.
•
Nicolas Sangouard, University of Basel.
•
Rebecca Schmidt, University of Nottingham Uni-
•
Diego Tielas, Department of Physics, University of
La Plata, La Plata, Argentina. Faculty of Engineering, University of La Plata, Argentina .
versity Park, Nottingham, UK.
•
•
Max Tillman, University of Vienna - Quantum In-
Ferdinand Schmidt-Kaler, QUANTUM Institut für
formation Science and Quantum Computation -
Physik, Universität Mainz, Deutschland.
Group of Philip Walther.
•
Christian Schmiegelow, JGU - Uni-Mainz.
•
Stefan Schütz, Theoretische Physik, Universität des
Saarlandes, Saarbrücken, Germany.
•
Nora Tischler,
ARC Center for Engineered
Quantum Systems, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Macquarie University, Sydney, Australia.
•
•
Vitalii Semin, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Dur-
Fabricio Toscano, Universidade Federal do Rio de
Janeiro (UFRJ).
ban, South Africa.
•
•
Alfred U’Ren,
Instituto de Ciencias Nucle-
Biswajit Sen, Vidyasagar Teachers’ Training Col-
ares, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México
lege, Midnapore, India.
(UNAM).
41
Quantum Optics VII, 27-31 October 2014, Mar del Plata, ARGENTINA
•
Imam Usmani, Institut d’Optique Graduate School,
•
•
•
Andrea Valdés Hernández, Instituto de Física,
Sascha Wallentowitz, Instituto de Física, Pontificia
Universidad Católica de Chile, Santiago, Chile.
Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de
Janeiro, RJ, Brazil.
•
Stephen Walborn, Universidade Federal do Rio de
Janeiro.
Palaiseau, France.
Alejandra Valencia, Universidad de los Andes,
•
Xin Wang, Jilin University.
•
Andrew White, University of Queensland.
•
Diego Wisniacki, Dpto. de Fisica, UBA.
•
Matthew Woolley, UNSW Canberra.
•
Nicim Zagury, Universidade Federal do Rio de
Colombia.
•
Paulo Valente, Facultad de Ingeniería, Universidad
de la República, Montevideo, Uruguay.
•
Miguel Varga, Laboratorio de Procesado de Imá-
Janeiro.
genes, Departamento de Física, FCEyN, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Buenos Aires, Argentina.
•
Ricardo Zamar, Facultad de Matemática, Astronomía y Física - Universidad Nacional de Cór-
•
David Velasco Villamizar, Universidade Federal de
doba.
Santa Catarina, Brazil.
•
•
Mihai Vidrighin, Imperial College, London.
•
Celso Villas-Boas, Departamento de Física - Uni-
(UNC - CONICET), Facultad de Matemática, Astronomía y Física (UNC).
versidade Federal de São Carlos, São Carlos,
•
Brazil.
•
Pablo Zangara, Instituto de Física Enrique Gaviola
Anton Zeilinger, University of Vienna, Austrian
Academy of Sciences.
Ulrich Vogl, Max Planck Institute for the Science of
•
Peter Zoller, Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of Innsbruck, Innsbruck, Austria.
Light.
42