6 Big Sky firefighters climb for cancer

Life and land from the heart of the Yellowstone Region
Jan. 23 - Feb. 5, 2015
Volume 6 // Issue #2
Big Sky firefighters
climb for cancer
Community member profile:
Colin Mathews
Inside Bozeman's
newest distillery
Raising funds for avy
forecasters
Back 40:
Montana's receding glaciers
explorebigsky
explorebigsky
#explorebigsky
ON THE COVER: Dennis Uhl, a snowmobile guide for Big Sky’s Canyon Adventures, rips through some powder
Jan. 20 on Buck’s Ridge with The Sphynx in the distance. PHOTO BY WES OVERVOLD
Jan. 23 – Feb. 5, 2015
Volume 6, Issue No. 2
BELOW: Lone Mountain glows during a pastel-infused sunset on Jan. 20. PHOTO BY MARIA WYLLIE
Owned and published in Big Sky, Montana
PUBLISHER
Eric Ladd
EDITORIAL
MANAGING EDITOR
Joseph T. O’Connor
SENIOR EDITOR/
DISTRIBUTION DIRECTOR
Tyler Allen
ASSOCIATE EDITOR
Maria Wyllie
CREATIVE
CREATIVE DIRECTOR
Kelsey Dzintars
GRAPHIC DESIGNER
Taylor-Ann Smith
VIDEO DIRECTOR
Brian Niles
PHOTOGRAPHER/VIDEOGRAPHER
Wes Overvold
SALES AND OPERATIONS
CHIEF OPERATING OFFICER
Megan Paulson
DIRECTOR OF SALES
E.J. Daws
ACCOUNT MANAGER
Katie Morrison
ACCOUNT COORDINATOR
Maria Wyllie
MEDIA AND EVENTS DIRECTOR
Ersin Ozer
ACCOUNTANT
Alexis Deaton
CONTRIBUTORS
Todd Anderson, John Arnold, Jamie Balke, Johanne
Bouchard, Jill Bough, Sheila Chapman, Jackie
Rainford Corcoran, Kwame Dawes, Sebastien Dion,
Dan Egan, Ted Kooser, Jeff Linkenbach, Nancy
Mahoney, Barbara Rowley, Katie Smith, Patrick
Straub, Ian van Collier
Editorial Policy
Outlaw Partners LLC is the sole owner of the
Explore Big Sky. EBS reserves the right to edit all
submitted material. Printed material reflects the
opinion of the author and is not necessarily the
opinion of Outlaw Partners or its editors. EBS will
not publish anything discriminatory or in bad taste.
Taking a minute
Here in Montana we enjoy a slower pace of life.
After the holiday bustle, many of us can swing back
into that “stop and smell the roses” mentality –
that’s part of why we call this beautiful place home.
offers ski tips for less-than-snowy conditions, and
Lone Mountain Ranch encourages guests to pick up
their fly-fishing rods during this recent, unseasonably warm weather.
We’re spoiled with the uninterrupted scenery and
clear skies, and it can be easy to grow accustomed to
a landscape that still looks like it once was. Taking a
minute to enjoy starry nights and colorful sunsets
can be a replenishing feeling, serving as a reminder
of why we live here. However, it’s also important
not to remain complacent. We have tough questions
to ask about how to preserve Montana, amidst the
growing population and infrastructure in the region.
This winter’s occasional spring-like conditions,
followed by sub-zero cold snaps, indicate that
something isn’t right. While we can all enjoy skiing
in T-shirts and not having to bundle up quite so
much, don’t forget those powder mornings, pristine
waters, and crisp, clean air that make Montana “the
last best place.”
This issue of Explore Big Sky includes a story about
Glacier National Park’s melting glaciers, which
scientists suspect will be gone in 30 years. Dan Egan
Letters to the Editor
Letters to the editor allow EBS readers to express
views and share how they would like to effect
change. These are not Thank You notes. Letters
should be 250 words or less, respectful, ethical,
accurate, and proofread for grammar and content. We
reserve the right to edit letters. Include: full name,
address, phone number and title. Submit to
[email protected]
ADVERTISING DEADLINE
For the Feb. 6 issue:
Jan. 30, 2015
CORRECTIONS
Please report errors to [email protected]
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Hundreds of drop points
surrounding Yellowstone
National Park
Take a minute and smell the wild roses, but let’s also
ask ourselves how we can ensure they’re still growing here in the years to come.
– Maria Wyllie
NPS. JIM PEACO
It’s Good, Clean Fun!
Daily Guided
Yellowstone Park Tours
• Snowmobile the National Forest
• Guides not required
• All new snowmobiles
• Free maps
• Environmentally friendly 4-stroke snowmobiles
• Professional, friendly & knowledgeable guide staff
• Group size no larger than ten snowmobiles
• Frequent stops for photos & sightseeing
• Variety of Park destinations
• Private tours available
• No bad seats or fogged windows
406.646.7802 • 800.522.7802
West Yellowstone, MT
www.twotopsnowmobile.com
Family owned and operated since 1966 • Licensed Yellowstone Concessionaire
4 Jan. 23 - Feb. 5, 2015
TABLE OF CONTENTS
explorebigsky.com
Explore Big Sky
FEATURES:
TABLE OF
CONTENTS
6 17
Big Sky
Section 1: News
Local News...................................................5
Montana................................15
Section 2: Business, Sports, and Health
Business Profile.............................................17
Business............................................19
Sports..............................................27
Health...........................................31
Section 3: Outdoors and Entertainment
Events....................................33
firefighters climb
for cancer
Inside Bozeman's newest
distillery
11
Community member profile:
COLIN MATHEWS
C a l e n d a r. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 6
Wanderer at Rest.......................................38
Outdoors...............................38
The Eddy Line............................................41
Word from the Resorts...............................44
Gear Review..............................................46
Fun...................................................47
Back 40........................................................48
33
48
Back 40: Montana's receding glaciers
Rasing funds for avy
forecasters
Explore Big Sky is the local paper for Big Sky, Montana, and a news and lifestyle
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LOCAL
Jan. 23 - Feb. 5, 2015 5
Letter to the Editor:
Help stop the spread of
houndstongue
Winter is my dogs’ favorite season. Nothing makes them happier than
heading out for a ski on our favorite trails, and since they’re Australian
Shepherds with thick, woolly coats, they have no problem keeping warm.
The downside to those warm coats is that they easily pick up unwanted burs
– especially houndstongue seeds.
Houndstongue is listed as a noxious weed in Montana, and its seeds are
covered with barbs that have been referred to as “nature’s Velcro.” This
characteristic facilitates the effective, widespread dispersal of seeds on the
fur of passing wildlife, livestock and pets, and also on the clothes of humans.
Invasive weeds are one of the greatest threats to Montana’s environment.
Houndstongue foliage also has the potential to poison livestock and wildlife.
Seeds are the only source of reproduction for houndstongue, so be aware of
seeds clinging to you or your dog and dispose of them properly.
Bring an extra plastic bag with you and if you find your dog covered in burs,
take the time to collect and dispose of them – if you toss the seeds alongside
the trail, you’ll be spreading noxious weeds and making it worse for years to
come.
Anyone who enjoys our amazing trails can do their part in reducing the
spread of noxious weeds. So pay attention to what clings to your pet when
you’re outside and help keep our trails beautiful and noxious weed free!
Jennifer Mohler
Coordinator
Gallatin/Big Sky Weed Committee
6 Jan. 23 - Feb. 5, 2015
LOCAL
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Explore Big Sky
Climbing for a cause
Big Sky Fire raising funds for leukemia, lymphoma
BY JOSEPH T. O’CONNOR
EXPLORE BIG SKY MANAGING EDITOR
BIG SKY – For the second year running, Big Sky firefighters are taking steps –
literally – to raise awareness and funding for leukemia and lymphoma research.
On March 8, three of Big Sky’s finest will again climb for cancer.
The Scott Sports-sponsored Firefighter Stairclimb, held in the Columbia Center
in Seattle, Wash., draws firefighters from around the country to one of the
nation’s largest fundraisers for the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society. During the
2014 event, 1,800 firefighters from more than 300 departments raised nearly $2
million for LLS.
On Jan. 18, Hamel, Vildas and Bakke held a fundraising demonstration in front
of Roxy’s Market in Big Sky, toting a stair mill from the station. Climbing in
full turnouts and oxygen tanks, the firefighters climbed in 20-minute intervals
continuously for five hours, answering questions and raising community
awareness.
“It went really well,” Hamel said. “People were receptive and we raised over
$1,000.”
Last year, BSFD raised approximately $5,000 for the event, a respectable
number, Hamel says, but far from where they hope to be this year. The Boise Fire
Department led all Firefighter Stairclimb fundraising efforts in 2014, amassing
$78,500 for LLS.
The Boise department sent more than 50 firefighters to compete in the
stairclimb in 2014, and each raised money for their station. According to Audra
Daniels, LLS’ Senior Campaign Manager for the event, fundraising is ranked
per capita for context.
“Obviously you can’t compete [in fundraising dollars] if you have a team of two
or three,” Daniels said. “[BSFD] came in 23rd per capita out of 323 teams last
year.”
The Big Sky firefighters are in the process of planning more fundraising
demonstrations, and have their sites set on a date around President’s Day
weekend, from Feb. 14-16, though negotiations on the venue and exact date are
still underway.
“What the event is for and what it represents is an amazing cause,” Hamel said.
“The Leukemia and Lymphoma Society is really at the forefront of research for
all cancers right now.”
Call (406) 995-2100 for donation information.
Big Sky Fire Department Firefighter Stairclimb competitors give a fundraising
demonstration in front of Roxy’s Market on Jan. 18. (From left to right: Mike Bakke,
Jordi Viladas, Mitch Hamel, and mascot Hoss.) PHOTO COURTESY OF BSFD
This is Mitch Hamel’s second year competing and he will join his Big Sky
Fire Department colleagues Mike Bakke and Jordi Viladas in the 24th annual
event against more than 1,900 racers, but this one is even more special, Hamel
says. The trio will climb in honor of Allistair Anderson, a 5-year-old girl with
leukemia, whom they connected with through Eagle Mount-Bozeman.
“She’s been battling cancer since she was 21 months old,” said Hamel, 32, adding
that LLS will hang posters of each honoree in the Columbia Center stairwell
during the climb. “The entire time you’re climbing you’ll see all those faces and
people who’ve been battling the disease. It’s really a cool reminder of why you’re
there.”
The Firefighter Stairclimb is an event that will make those who live on a 10th
floor feel lucky. Or even a 30th floor.
BRIDGER CANYON MASTERPIECE, BOZEMAN
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The Columbia Center is the second tallest building west of the Mississippi, with
69 flights containing 1,311 steps that rise 788 vertical feet from the streets of
downtown Seattle. Competitors, who must be union or volunteer U.S.-based
firefighters, wear full protective outerwear called turnouts as well as oxygen
tanks, and the gear weighs up to 70 pounds.
“You’re standing outside and looking up at the Columbia tower going, ‘Holy
cow’.” said Hamel. “You get your mask on, put your helmet on … and run into
the building. You’re nervous and excited, but once you hit the stairs, it’s go
time.”
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Finishing the climb in just over 18 minutes last year and placing 311th, Hamel
says his goal in March is to come in under 15 minutes. Bakke, 27, finished 195th
at 17:02, and Viladas, 25, is in his rookie year with BSFD, a firefighter with the
Bellingham, Wash.-based Marietta Fire Department last year.
Missoula firefighter Andrew Drobek came in first each of the last two years. In
2014, he finished in 11 minutes, five seconds.
Hamel says preparing for the stairclimb is an inherent job duty as a firefighter.
“We train year round to stay fit for the community, [so] we’re ready to go today if
we had to,” he said.
DIAMOND BAR 7, BIG TIMBER
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Outstanding building site with mtn views
Community water system
An independently owned and operated broker member of BRER Affiliates, Inc. Prudential, the Prudential logo and Rock symbol are service marks of Prudential Financial, Inc. and its related
entities, registered in many jurisdictions worldwide. Used under license with no other affiliation of Prudential. Equal Housing Opportunity. All information contained herein is derived from
sources deemed reliable; however, is not guaranteed by Prudential Montana Real Estate, Managing Broker, Agents or Sellers. Offering is subject to error, omissions, prior sales, price change
or withdrawal without notice and approval of purchase by Seller. We urge independent verification of each and every item submitted, to the satisfaction of any prospective purchaser.
LOCAL
Jan. 23 - Feb. 5, 2015 7
LOCAL
A collection of
Alpine Home
Jesse Scovell, Big Sky, Mont.
Ski tech at Grizzly Outfitters Ski and Backcountry
Sports
Decor & Chalet
Style Antiques
“To fly without wings for practical reasons.”
Ashton Fell, Big Sky, Mont.
Freelance Designer
“To stop time because then you’d have all the time
in the world to get everything done, and then all
the rest of the time in the world to do what you
want.”
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USE PROMO CODE:
OUTLAW
Alex Buecking, Big Sky, Mont.
Manager of East Slope Outdoors
“It would be able to sing any karaoke song at any
time because it’s a lifelong goal that I haven’t been
able to achieve yet.”
COM E S TAY.
Standing ski
coat rack
off
If you could have any super power
what would it be, and why?
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20 Miller Lane / $13.7 M / 9,244 SQ FT
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Ranch Lot 87 / $297K / 3.65 ACRES
Ranch Lot 10 / $275K / 5.1 ACRES
10 Half Hitch / $3.49 M / 4,924 SQ FT
Buck Ridge Lodge / $899K / 4,144 SQ FT
BIG SKY
UNDER CONTRACT
Park Condo 294 / $365K / 1,451 SQ FT
Village Center 281 / $350K / 473 SQ FT
Cedar Creek #45 / $229K / 868 SQ FT
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YELLOWSTONE CLUB
Sunrise Ridge 35B/ $3.995M / 3,120 SQ FT
Lot 338 / $4.95M / 14.6 ACRES
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Elkridge 68 / $585K /1.02 ACRES
Ranch Lot 110 / $395K / 2.38 ACRES
Ranch Lot 93 / $350K / 4.84 ACRES
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BIG SKY
UNDER CONTRACT
Spanish Peaks Club Condo #11 /
$630K /2,314 SQ FT
1085 Looking Glass / $559K / 2,100 SQ FT
145 Karst Stage / $497K / 2,288 SQ FT
13 Beartooth Rd. / $480K / 2,782 SQ FT
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Mtn. Meadows / $3.495 M / 120 ACRES
Lot 43A Half Moon / $379.9K / 1.22 ACRES
Antler Ridge Lot 183 / $180K / .46ACRES
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this is not a solicitation to change. ©2014 LK REAL ESTATE, llc. lkrealestate.com
10 Jan. 23 - Feb. 5, 2015
LOCAL
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Explore Big Sky
New scholarships for arts education camp
BY BARBARA ROWLEY
EXPLORE BIG SKY CONTRIBUTOR
BIG SKY – Summer camp was not on one busy
Big Sky family’s radar until last year, when
their daughter’s passion for writing led them to
explore an internationally renowned arts camp
in Interlochen, Mich. Now, Loren and Jill Bough
have established a scholarship to the Interlochen
Summer Camps for local students.
“We really like being together as a family,
especially during our beautiful Montana
summers, so we definitely weren’t looking to
send Dasha away,” Jill said. “But the opportunity
for her to be able to have both the time and expert
direction to work on her writing in such a great
atmosphere changed our mind.” “Sending off our students to programs like
these not only helps the individual students
who receive them, it helps all the students at
the school,” says Loren, who is also chair of the
local school board. “Because when these kids get
accepted to programs like this, it shows them
that we are adequately preparing our students to
compete in the larger world, both with the talents
they possess and the initiative and drive to take
advantage of them.” Following her acceptance into Interlochen’s
competitive high school writing camp program,
Lone Peak High School sophomore Dasha
Bough, 15, went to Interlochen for three weeks.
The experience was game changing for the
young writer, she says, and the Boughs were
blown away by the caliber of the opportunity
Interlochen offered in the arts – from writing
and filmmaking to dance and musical theater, to
instrumental and vocal camps.
Contact Lone Peak High School Program
Coordinator Brenda Yahraes at (406) 995-4281
to find out more about the Bough Interlochen
Scholarships. Visit camp.interlochen.org to learn
more about Interlochen Summer Camps.
“The energy on campus is amazing,” Dasha said.
“There is art happening absolutely everywhere.
The kids are so passionate and focused.” The Boughs hadn’t planned on spending three
weeks apart from their daughter over the short
Montana summer, but Interlochen’s curriculum
was extensive.
After meeting with Interlochen officials in the
fall, the Boughs created a Big Sky School District
scholarship that will allow two students in
grades 6-10 to attend Interlochen each summer,
pending acceptance to the program of their
choice. Need and acceptance will be determined
solely by Interlochen, which will administer the
scholarships.
With two other Big Sky kids also taking part
in Interlochen’s camps last summer –Elizabeth
Quackenbush in the filmmaking program, and
Michael Romney in piano – it seemed clear to the
Boughs that Interlochen’s programs had much to
offer Big Sky kids who are exposed to the area’s
burgeoning local art scene.
Application deadlines for programs that require an
audition or portfolio are Feb. 1, while applications
for other programs are accepted on a first-come,
first-served basis. “Moose Marsh”
“Hoof Beats”
Represented by
Paula Pearl
Capturing the Spirit of Life
paulapearl.com
Creighton Block Gallery
33 Lone Peak Drive
Creighton Block406.586.6850
Gallery
Big Sky, MT
33 Lone Peak Drive, Big Sky, MT
406.993.9400 406.993.9400 paulapearl.com
hours.
Sunday 1-5p.m.
Monday 10a.m.-6p.m.
(Toddlers Storytime 10:30 a.m.)
bigskylibrary.org
Announcements
Toddler Storytime
Mon. 1/26 & 2/2
at 10:30 am
Everyone is welcome!
Tuesday 4-8p.m.
Wednesday 4-8p.m.
Closed Thursday-Saturday
Public Computers
available here. All are
welcome.
Located at the north end
of Ophir School
explorebigsky.com
LOCAL
Explore Big Sky
Jan. 23 - Feb. 5, 2015 11
Community member profile: Colin Mathews
Local gallery owner exudes vision for the arts
BY MARIA WYLLIE
EXPLORE BIG SKY ASSOCIATE EDITOR
BIG SKY – Creighton Block
Gallery, located in Big Sky
Town Center, is home to a
diverse collection of Western
art, including impressionist
landscapes, traditional
representational wildlife art, and
historical Western paintings.
Every piece tells a story, and
Colin Mathews, who owns the
gallery with his wife Paula,
is eager to share each with
customers who walk through the
doors. His own stories are often
just as intriguing.
Donning a white cowboy hat,
bolo tie, bright red ski shirt and
jeans on a cold January day in Big
Sky, Mathews, 67, is reminiscent
of a cowboy skier – and he
pulls it off. With a twinkle in
his eye and a way with words,
it’s easy to lose track of time
in his company, whether the
conversation is about fine art or
his years growing up in Sausalito,
Calif., among writers, artists and
musicians.
Inside Creighton Block Gallery, Colin Mathews poses alongside a bronze bust of “Wild Bill,” made by sculptor Greg Woodard.
Mathews’ passion for the arts
PHOTO BY MARIA WYLLIE
has been lifelong. He studied
art history at California’s
five years. “It all boils down to the fact that
Although Mathews now staffs the gallery when
Stanford University and in Austria for a year,
he needs to take a ski break, he says the notice
he’s passionate about the arts, and that comes
providing him with a classical education from the
remains more for nostalgia than any other reason.
through.”
Renaissance through Impressionism.
In the 1970s, after graduating from the
University of Pennsylvania Law School,
Mathews worked as a lawyer in Washington,
D.C., where he enforced oil price controls for
the U.S. Department of Energy before practicing
at the law firm of Vinson & Elkins. In 1992, he
retired to pursue other business interests before
returning to the West, “to live among a better
class of human beings,” he says.
“My office décor would be the envy of my former
law partners,” Mathews adds with a goodhumored grin.
Creighton Block Gallery opened in Big Sky in
October 2010, moving from its original location
in Virginia City, Mont. After living in Virginia
City for 13 years, where he opened a restaurant
prior to operating the gallery – and also served
as mayor for three years – Mathews felt it was
time to move on. And as a lifelong skier, a chance
to live at the base of Lone Mountain was a big
incentive.
“My passion for skiing is matched only by my
passion for my family, my friends, and art,” he
said. Born in Salt Lake City, Mathews’ parents
instilled in him a love for the sport at age 4, when
he put on his first pair of skis. His affinity for
deep snow is reflected in the sign on his gallery
door, which notes, ‘We ski powder mornings.’”
-----------------------------------------------------------Since bringing the gallery to Big Sky, Mathews
has developed relationships with many of the
artists he represents, now proudly calling them
friends.
“Artists are among the bravest people I know,” he
said, comparing their plight to a children’s game
where pegs are repeatedly hammered through
holes in a wooden bench. “Artists put their soul
into creative work and offer it to the public not
knowing whether it will be well-received, or
whether the artist will experience something
akin to the last peg standing [in] the immortal
children’s toy, the peg bench.”
While Mathews has his own favorite pieces in
the gallery, he’s careful to let patrons discover
treasures for themselves.
“Almost everyone has had the experience of
looking at a painting and having it sing to them,”
he said. “The universal experience of a painting
touching one’s soul is part of what makes owning
a gallery such a marvelous experience.”
Mathews’ love for his business is also evident to
the artists he represents.
“He has a great energy when you enter the
gallery,” said Paula Pearl, an impressionistic
wildlife painter based in Bozeman whose art
has been hanging in Creighton Block for about
Creighton Block’s inventory has quadrupled since
2010, and Mathews opened a second gallery in
the Town Center’s new TNG Tower building
in December 2014 – a contemporary gallery
featuring art with Western inflection but with
modern expression.
Outside of his galleries, Mathews is also involved
in bringing arts to the community.
“Colin has a vision for the arts in Big Sky,” said
Tallie Lancey, Vice President for the Arts Council
of Big Sky and board member of the Warren
Miller Performing Arts Center. “His leadership
with the Arts Council’s annual art auction has
enabled our organization to grow in ways we
wouldn’t have thought possible.”
Mathews also serves on the Arts Council board,
sponsors the art prize at Lone Peak High School,
and enjoys the occasional opportunity to hang
monumental art as a backdrop at WMPAC. His
most recent undertaking is to further beautify the
area by placing five sculptures by famed English
sculptor Simon Gudgeon, who specializes in large
pieces for public display, around the new TNG
Tower building.
“Owning a gallery facilitates community
involvement,” Mathews said. “And offering my
time to community has been a lifelong passion of
mine.”
12 Jan. 23 - Feb. 5, 2015
LOCAL
explorebigsky.com
Explore Big Sky
Harbor DeWaard competes at the 2014 Big Sky PBR Mutton Bustin' event. OUTLAW PARTNERS PHOTO
Obituary
Harbor Kingston DeWaard
Harbor Kingston DeWaard was born on Oct. 8, 2008, at Bozeman Deaconess
Hospital at 5:59 p.m. Harbor was intelligent, funny, creative, and had an
imagination that could go past the moon – to the sun and beyond. Harbor
was so brave and he became an organ donor after he passed on Jan. 12, 2015,
which could save the lives of seven other children or young adults. He
was a leader at school and a true individual; he even had kids twice his age
look up to him. When he graduated from Morning Star Learning Center in
Big Sky, Mont., he received the Best Manners Award. In his short time in
kindergarten, he obtained the Student of the Week Award.
Harbor loved the outdoors and was an extremely gifted skier for his age; he
had no fear when he put on his ski gear. He also enjoyed off-roading with
his favorite dog Kaya, tee-ball, soccer, fishing, skipping rocks at the river,
dancing, swimming, playing at the beach, Lego-building, playing with
Thomas the Train, mutton bustin’ and playing hot wheels. His favorite foods
were steak, spaghetti, pepperoni pizza, sushi, grape tomatoes and seaweed.
He loved his friends and family, and they loved him right back. He loved his
mother and father, who loved him to infinity and beyond. Harbor’s tragic death changed an entire community. His presence has made
an impact on this earth bigger than any meteor; thousands of lives have been
changed from coast to coast. Harbor left behind his mother Candice Brownmiller; father Jaritt DeWaard;
his two grandmothers Lynn Brownmiller and Cheri DeWaard; two
grandfathers Paul Brownmiller and Terry DeWaard; and all of his loving
aunts, uncles, cousins, family and friends. Harbor, thanks for being the best
boy...the happy, happy boy!
Arrangements are being made by Cremation & Funeral Gallery. Condolences
may be sent to the family at cfgbillings.com through “Our Families.”
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Explore Big Sky
LOCAL
Jan. 23 - Feb. 5, 2015 13
Obituary
Kurt A. Simon
Kurt Simon passed away on Saturday, Nov. 22, 2014 at the age of 52. Kurt
was born in St. Louis, Mo., and grew up in nearby Ferguson. After graduation
from McCluer High School, he moved to the Lake of the Ozarks, in Missouri.
There he began his culinary career, which flourished over the next 18 years.
A good friend and co-worker at the lake talked him into a job at Buck’s T-4
Lodge in Big Sky, which he loved so much that he spent 15 years and the
remainder of his career there.
Although Kurt enjoyed his Big Sky life and all the wonderful friends he
made, he was a Missouri boy at heart and adored his St. Louis Cardinals. Kurt
was a dedicated worker, a trusted friend, an avid hunter, a patriot, and truly a
gentle soul. Kurt is the beloved son of the late Marvin A. and Grace E. Simon; dear
brother of Dennis (Kim) Simon and Barbara (Richard) Schmermund; dear
uncle of Joseph (Miirei), David, Katheryn, Melanie (Tony) Lima, Richard
and Rachel Schmermund and LaNae and Brett Simon; dear great uncle of
Matthew and Noah Schmermund; dear cousin and friend.
A memorial service will be held Sunday, Feb. 8 at 1:30 p.m. at Buck’s T-4 in
the Montana Ballroom. Musical friends are encouraged to bring instruments.
In lieu of flowers, the family requests that donations be made to American
Legion Post #99, P.O. Box 160144, Big Sky, MT 59716.
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Public comment requested on North Hebgen
landscape project
Open house and field tour Jan. 27
CUSTER GALLATIN NATIONAL FOREST
WEST YELLOWSTONE – The Custer Gallatin
National Forest is seeking public comment
through Feb. 10 on the North Hebgen Multiple
Resource project, which aims to reduce fire
hazard and mitigate disturbance effects. A variety
of vegetation management treatments are being
considered in the Teepee drainage, along with
drainages on the north side of Hebgen Lake, as
well as along a portion of U.S. Highway 191 from
Teepee Creek south to Duck Creek and west to
the Horse Butte peninsula. An open house and field tour will be held Jan.
27 to familiarize people with the proposed
landscape level project area. The integrated
project encompasses 73,250 acres, of which
approximately 8,200 acres are proposed for
treatment. This would include thinning followed
by piling, burning, chopping and/or masticating
natural and activity fuels or possibly prescribed
burning.
Stands in the area are susceptible to dangerous
and damaging fire behavior due to the
combination of surface fuel loading and
continuous vegetation into the canopy, known as
ladder and crown fuels. A variety of treatments
are designed to reduce surface, ladder and crown
fuels, such as thinning and group selection
harvest.
Focused around several housing subdivisions
and essential infrastructure, and in the Tepee
drainage, treatments are proposed to improve
public and firefighter safety. This would be
achieved by reducing fuel in the wildland/
urban interface; enhancing wildlife habitat by
revitalizing aspen and whitebark pine; improving
public and wildlife safety by opening up visibility
near the Rainbow Point Campground and along
Highway 191; and increasing forest health and
resiliency.
Portions of the treatment area would be thinned,
decreasing competition for key species such as
whitebark pine and Douglas fir. Aspen stands
would be opened up, reducing the conifer
encroachment, increasing vigor and the likelihood
of natural sprouting amongst these habitats. Along
U.S. Highway 191 sight distance will be improved
through thinning, helping to alleviate wildlife and
vehicle collisions common in the area. Mountain pine beetle, western spruce budworm,
lodgepole pine dwarf mistletoe, Douglas fir
beetle and white pine blister rust are also of
concern in the project area. These natural
and introduced disturbance factors can have a
significant impact in similar or uniform age class
species. A variety of treatments are planned to
increase resiliency to insect and disease in some
stands, and to reduce or eliminate presence of
damaging agents in other stands.
Send comments to: [email protected]
fs.fed.us; subject line North Hebgen Integrated
Vegetation Management Project, with commenter’s
name, address and contact number. Comments
are considered part of public record. To attend
the open house and field trip on Jan. 27 meet at
Hebgen Lake Ranger District, West Yellowstone,
at 2 p.m. The open house will follow the field tour
from 4-6 p.m. at the West Yellowstone Chamber of
Commerce.
To download and read project documents visit
online at: fs.usda.gov/gallatin and click on the
right-hand link: NEPA and Public Scoping
Documents.
MDT proposes turning
lane addition on U.S. 191
MONTANA DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION
WEST YELLOWSTONE - The Montana Department of Transportation is
notifying the public and seeking comments on a proposal to construct new turn
lanes at the intersection of U.S. Highway 191 and Rainbow Point Road. The
project is located between reference posts 4.7 and 5.1, about five miles north of
West Yellowstone. Proposed work includes reconstructing the roadway to build wider shoulders
and constructing a left-turn lane from U.S. 191 to Rainbow Point Road. The
project would finish with a chip seal of the new asphalt, as well as installing
new pavement markings and upgrading signage as needed. New right-of-way and relocation of utilities will be required, and construction
is tentatively planned to run beyond 2020, depending on the completion of
design and availability of funds. MDT staff will contact all affected landowners prior to doing survey work
on their land, and staff will again contact landowners prior to construction
regarding property acquisition and temporary construction permits. Members of the public may submit written comments to the Montana
Department of Transportation Butte office at P.O. Box 3068, Butte, Mont.,
59702-3068, or online at mdt.mt.gov/mdt/comment_form.shtml.
For more information, contact Butte District Administrator Jeff Ebert at (406)
494-9625 or Project Design Engineer Jennifer Nelson at (406) 444 6227. For the
hearing impaired, the TTY number is (406) 444 7696 or (800) 335-7592, or call
the Montana Relay at 711. MONTANA
Jan. 23 - Feb. 5, 2015 15
MONTANA
Radio announcements
highlight importance of
breakfast
MSU NEWS SERVICE
BOZEMAN – The Montana Team
Nutrition program at Montana State
University and other partners have
created a series of eight public service
announcements about the importance
of children eating breakfast. The free,
30-second announcements, called
“Breakfast: Every Child, Every Day,”
are available for all Montana radio
stations to air.
The announcements are designed to
reinforce the importance of eating
breakfast and highlight options –
such as free, reduced price and expanded breakfast programs in schools
– for accessing breakfast in Montana
communities. They feature Montana
First Lady Lisa Bullock and Montana
Superintendent of Public Instruction
Denise Juneau.
“Children who regularly eat breakfast are better prepared for success in
the classroom,” Juneau said. “They
behave better in school, are late or
absent less frequently, and score
higher on math and reading tests. I’m
excited to see more Montana schools
offering healthy breakfasts and trying
out strategies like breakfast in the
classroom.” KGLT-FM radio at MSU produced
the announcements in partnership
with the Montana Team Nutrition
program, the Montana Governor’s
Office, the Montana Office of Public
Instruction, the Montana Food Bank
Network, School Meals that Rock
founder Dayle Hayes, Valtron Recording Studio and Montana Action
for Healthy Kids. A national organization, Action for Healthy Kids,
funded the project through its state
affiliate. “Breakfast: Every Child, Every Day”
announcements may be downloaded
for free on the Montana Food Bank
Network website at mfbn.org/breakfast. They’re available as both audio
and text files.
For more information contact Molly
Stenberg, nutrition education and
consultant with the Montana Team
Nutrition program, at (406) 994-7217
or [email protected]
Glendive oil spill sparks concern
over Keystone XL pipeline
NORTHERN PLAINS RESOURCE COUNCIL
GLENDIVE – A pipeline ruptured
near Glendive on Jan. 17 and spilled
up to 50,000 gallons of oil into the
Yellowstone River. This is the second
major spill in the Yellowstone in 3 1/2
years.
Harmful compounds, particularly the
cancer-causing chemical compound
benzene, were released into the river
and residents reported tasting and
smelling oil in their water on Jan. 18.
Gov. Steve Bullock declared a state of
emergency for Dawson and Richland
counties on Jan. 19, and the public
was still being advised not to drink the
water at EBS press time on Jan. 21.
A Bridger Pipeline spokesman said
the break happened Saturday morning
about nine miles upstream from Glendive. The company, which transports
Bakken crude, is confident that no
more than 50,000 gallons of oil spilled
during the hour-long breach.
This discharge is similar in size to another pipeline spill in the Yellowstone
River that gained national attention 3
1/2 years ago. ExxonMobil’s Silvertip
pipeline burst during a flood on July 1,
2011, below the Yellowstone riverbed
near Laurel. More than 63,000 gallons
of oil quickly spread downstream,
affecting wildlife, parks, landowners,
and agriculture producers.
Hundreds of workers cleaned up the
mess for months at a cost of $135
million and $1.6 million in state fines
for Exxon, as well as a lawsuit filed
against the oil company by landowners
affected by the spill.
In the latest spill, an oil sheen was
spotted 60 miles downstream. Ice on
the river has hampered early cleanup
efforts.
This oil spill has reinforced landowner
concerns about having the proposed
Keystone XL pipeline cross their
property.
“People should understand how serious pipeline spills are because they
don’t just affect the specific site where
the spill happens,” said Dena Hoff,
a Northern Plains Resource Council member and farmer/rancher whose
land borders the Yellowstone River
near where the spill occurred. “They
affect everyone for miles downstream,
to municipal water users, irrigators,
wildlife, recreationists, soil, water,
air, everything. Pipelines don’t have
a good track record. The Keystone XL
would cross just upstream from where
my irrigation water comes from.”
Northern Plains Resource Council is
a grassroots conservation organization
that organizes Montana citizens to protect our water quality, family farms and
ranches, and our unique quality of life.
Greg Woodard, “Ghost Rider,” Bronze, Edition of 21
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BUSINESS PROFILE
Explore Big Sky
Know Thy Dog p.22
Jan. 23 - Feb. 5, 2015 17
Big Horns beat rival team p.27
Section 2:
BUSINESS, SPORTS
AND HEALTH
Results from BSSEF p.29
Shop local, drink local
Bozeman Spirits Distillery
BY TAYLOR-ANN SMITH
EXPLORE BIG SKY STAFF WRITER
BOZEMAN – Walking into Bozeman
Spirits Distillery, located next to the
historic Charles Lundwall building in
downtown Bozeman, you’re greeted with
a relaxed atmosphere and genial staff
ready to serve you. The tasteful pairing of
reclaimed wood and metals throughout
the space brings both history and modern
charm to the tasting room. The focal point
of the space is clearly the bar, which
replicates that of an old saloon’s. Your fresh
cocktail rests upon wood from the 1930s,
which is part of the building’s original
floor.
History is an intimate part of Bozeman
Spirits Distillery as they aim to be a focal
point of the downtown area, and the
business prides itself on its Montana roots.
Since opening its doors on Oct. 31, the
distillery has created two types of vodka,
Bozeman Spirits Distillery has the perfect atmosphere to cozy up to the bar with a fresh cocktail and enjoy the
company of the locals. PHOTO COURTESY OF BOZEMAN SPIRITS
a gin and a whiskey, using Montana ingredients and as many locally
sourcing grains as possible. Each spirit is crafted with water sourced
from the Hyalite, Sourdough and Bozeman Creek watersheds, and all
distilling and bottling occurs in the back room of the distillery.
Bozeman Spirits offers an original vodka called Cold Spring Vodka, but
it’s the Cold Spring Huckleberry Vodka that’s making a big statement
in local restaurants. This mildly fruit-flavored spirit has replaced 44
North Huckleberry Vodka – a major competitor based out of Boise,
Idaho – in downtown restaurants including Montana Ale Works,
Plonk, and Open Range. Paradise Valley’s Chico Hot Springs has also
been serving the local vodka in its bars, according to Bozeman Spirits
owner Jim Harris.
“This was the first product I made back in the summer of 2012 and
it’s become my pride and joy,” Harris said. “I felt if I could make great
tasting products with the best ingredients, then that’d be where I
succeed.”
Bozeman Spirits also crafts a Montana 1889 Whiskey, which is named
for the date Montana gained statehood. This spirit is currently a
blended whiskey using finely sourced, seven-year aged corn rye from
the Eastern U.S. and blending it with whiskey they distill on site.
As the company grows and produces more whiskey, this blend will
eventually become 100 percent Montana sourced, Harris said. This
whiskey is especially good in their staple cocktail, the Montana Mule.
The drink is a twist on the classic Moscow Mule and features Montana
1889 Whiskey, ginger beer and a twist of lime served in a branded
copper mug.
After completing the vodkas and whiskey, Harris wanted to continue
testing his skills by distilling his Ruby River Gin. He explains that he
One of the sweeter items on the menu is the Huckleberry Lemon Drop. This cocktail
features a twist on a traditional Lemon Drop martini with the inclusion of Cold Spring
Huckleberry Vodka and fresh huckleberries. PHOTO BY TAYLOR-ANN SMITH
Continued on pg. 18
18 Jan. 23 - Feb. 5, 2015
BUSINESS PROFILE
explorebigsky.com
Explore Big Sky
Continued from pg. 17
was sitting on the bank of the Ruby River near Dillon, tying on a dry fly,
and noticed how clear the water was – as clear as gin, he said. The subtle
hints of botanicals create a smooth finish that pairs perfectly in their Gin
& Juice cocktail, and it’s recently become a hit at the tasting room.
The distillery is a tasting room, and according to its liquor license, patrons
are only allowed two servings at the bar and can purchase two bottles of
liquor at a time. While it may be hard to limit yourself to just two drinks,
they will likely be some of the best you’ll taste in town.
The Montana Mule is Bozeman Spirits' take on a classic drink, formerly known as the
Moscow Mule, and is served in a specially branded copper mug.
PHOTO BY TAYLOR- ANN SMITH
Bozeman Spirits Distillery takes pride in their Montana roots and hand-bottles
each product on location. PHOTO COURTESY OF BOZEMAN SPIRITS
A MODERN TAKE ON A CLASSIC VIEW
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Explore Big Sky
Jan. 23 - Feb. 5, 2015 19
Work hard? Play hard.
BY JOHANNE BOUCHARD
he was getting older. He was mesmerized at how
innovative he continued to be and how much more
effectively he was handling travel to board meetings,
overcoming jet lag and feeling fit.
EXPLORE BIG SKY BUSINESS COLUMNIST
The world is full of exceptionally driven, ambitious
individuals. From the outside, it may appear that
those who achieve success in their careers do so by
working constantly, but keys to their successes often
involve taking time to “play” – refreshing themselves
by downshifting to recreational activities.
Play can be invigorating. A leading female
biotech executive I know makes it a priority to walk
or run every morning, regardless of the weather. Her
daily exercise is her time to play freely in nature and
not solve problems. She says that as she gets ready
to go to work after her morning routine, her mind is
clearer and she is more effective when she walks into
her office.
With an incredible load of responsibilities it’s not
easy to make the time, but many high achievers
are inspired to maintain balance in their lives. It’s
possible when they make it a priority.
Big Sky residents and visitors are thirsty to live
and play in the outdoors, and this population
includes members of the Yellowstone Club,
representing some of the biggest movers and
shakers in the business world.
In alignment with ideas like those espoused by
Arianna Huffington and the Huffington Post’s Third
Metric – which redefines success to include wellbeing, wisdom and compassion – these successful
people understand that working 80-plus hours a
week without making time to relax and refresh can
lead to burnout, physical ailments or unhealthy
relationships.
If you’ve been working hard to get to the top of
your professional game, here are some ideas about
the value of play I’ve collected from observing high
achievers.
Play can be inspiring. “To make an embarrassing
admission, I like video games. That’s what got me into
software engineering when I was a kid.” – Elon Musk,
Tesla Motors CEO
Johanne Bouchard is originally from Quebec City,
Quebec and splits her time between Big Sky and
Belvedere, Calif. PHOTO BY SEBASTIEN DION
A successful clean-tech entrepreneur I know concurs
with Musk’s comment, saying he feels rejuvenated
when he allows himself to be playful and has greater
confidence and insights that might not have surfaced
otherwise.
Play can be healthy. “Take care of your body.
It’s the only place you have to live.” – Jim Rohn,
entrepreneur, author and motivational speaker.
Most successful leaders are very disciplined. One
of my clients and dear friends recently turned 70.
He’s been a successful entrepreneur and has striven
not to take his health for granted. Twenty years ago,
he integrated yoga into his routine and found that he
was more self-aware, and by being more centered in
his body, increased his ability to focus even though
I often conduct meetings while walking or hiking to
give clients, colleagues and mentees an opportunity
to incorporate something beneficial while we attend
to pressing business matters. The moments we take
to relax and recharge, making time to be playful, can
increase our ability to confront challenges in our
everyday life without resisting them and feeling
burdened.
“My general attitude to life is to enjoy every minute
of every day.” – Richard Branson, founder of Virgin
Group.
Live your life with balance in mind. Love yourself,
allowing yourself to play and to be playful.
Johanne Bouchard, a former high-tech executive,
is a leadership advisor to CEOs, executives and
entrepreneurs, as well as an expert in corporate board
composition and dynamics. An avid skier, Bouchard
and her husband have a second home in Big Sky. See
more at johannebouchard.com.
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20 Jan. 23 - Feb. 5, 2015
BUSINESS PROFILE
luxury listings
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Explore Big Sky
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BUSINESS
Explore Big Sky
Jan. 23 - Feb. 5, 2015 21
Business brief:
‘Hands-on chiropractic’
BY JOSEPH T. O’CONNOR
EXPLORE BIG SKY MANAGING EDITOR
BIG SKY – Local chiropractor Jeff Saad, D.C., has
added some help to his small practice, Montana
Chiropractic, in Big Sky Town Center. Lisa
Lundstrom, D.C., moved to Big Sky permanently
in November after selling her Rapid City, S.D.
practice in summer 2014, and began chiropractic
work in early December. She brings an extensive
background to the area, and one with a littleknown focus.
“I have a huge pediatric chiropractic
background,” says Lundstrom, who in 1998
received her Doctor of Chiropractic degree
from Northwestern College of Chiropractic in
Bloomington, Minn., and who trained under
Anne Langford, D.C., in St. Paul, Minn., with a
focus on pediatric work.
While Lundstrom adjusts people of all ages,
she saw a need in the Big Sky community
that she was happy to fill. “There are so many
[chiropractic] studies on kids it’s not even funny,”
she says. “A missing piece in the healthcare field
in Big Sky is … adjusting kids.”
Lundstrom points to the balance and health
benefits that chiropractic work has on people,
and says that starting young can benefit a
child whether they play tennis or ski. As for
overall health, she adds, chiropractic work is
being prescribed these days for everything
from colic and ear infections to teething,
pneumonia, asthma and migraine headaches.
“It’s healing from the inside, out,” Lundstrom
says. “The true meaning of chiropractic
is releasing that nerve root – the nervous
system. If you live life with a balanced
nervous system and your nerves are freeflowing, your life is better from every aspect.”
As the official chiropractor for the Big Sky Ski
Education Foundation, Lundstrom was drawn
to the beauty of the area, as well as the ability
for her two daughters, Ashley and Macy, to
ski.
BSSEF U-16 skier Sam Johnson is addicted
to Lundstrom’s treatments, according to his
mother, Martha Johnson. “It’s amazing,”
Martha said. “He feels better and the coolest
thing is that he said, ‘Mom, I think I could be
a [Doctor of] Chiropractic.’”
But Lundstrom’s adjustments aren’t relegated
to the young or the avid skier, she says.
“Everybody needs to be adjusted. It depends
on how often.”
Lisa Lundstrom, D.C., lives in Big Sky with her
husband Cory and daughters Ashley and Macy.
Call Montana Chiropractic at (406) 995-4050 for
appointment information.
Lisa Lundstrom, D.C., new addition to Montana Chiropractic, adjusts Sam Johnson and uses a cold laser to
reduce swelling and pain while increasing functionality
in his knee. PHOTO BY WES OVERVOLD
Brett Evertz
Real Estate Loan Officer
55 Lone Peak Drive | Big Sky, Montana
O: 406.556.3214 | C: 406.629.0132
[email protected] NMLS #523473
Member FDIC
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22 Jan. 23 - Feb. 5, 2015
BUSINESS
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Explore Big Sky
Know Thy Dog
STORY AND PHOTOS BY
WES OVERVOLD
EXPLORE BIG SKY STAFF WRITER
BOZEMAN – Enriching the lives of both
dogs and their owners has been Kelly Engel’s
passion since she was young. As the owner of
Bozeman’s newest dog training and boarding
facility, Know Thy Dog, she looks to share
that passion with southwest Montana.
Located just a short drive from downtown
Bozeman on Barnett Lane, Know Thy Dog
can accommodate a large number of canines
while providing a comprehensive amount
of services, Engel said of the business she
opened last November. The facility includes
both indoor and outdoor play areas, boarding
kennels, a full kitchen and a live-in suite, in
which Engel resides.
“[The center is] like a home, but it’s been
dog-proofed to accommodate up to 45 dogs,”
Engel said, adding that having a constant
presence allows her to pay close attention to
the visiting canines during their stay.
With an extensive background as both a dog
trainer and animal control officer, Engel
recognized that the Bozeman and Big Sky
areas were in dire need of a progressive facility
that offered training, boarding, and daycare,
she said. And by bringing on head trainer
Mandy Britton, who is also certified with the
Council for the Certification of Professional
Dog Trainers, Know Thy Dog provides a
valuable resource for the region’s dog-loving
residents.
Through expertise and training, Engel and
Britton are qualified to accept dogs from
a variety of backgrounds, including those
that show aggression toward humans. “It’s
amazing … to offer people help who were
going to get rid of their dogs or who were
sacrificing so much in their life,” said Engel,
who has been training and handling dogs
since age 7. “Every dog that comes in here
should leave in a better position than when
they started.”
In addition to boarding and training services,
Engel and Britton create an environment
that allows dogs to feel as comfortable and as
“at home” as they can. Whether the animals
spend an evening in the movie room or on an
afternoon adventure hike, the dogs are not far
removed from their environments back home.
“If you want your dog to have the same level
of companionship as they would get at home,
they can sleep in [a trainer’s] bed,” Britton said.
“It’s literally like they come into a new home,
and they get that [same] level of attention.”
Despite its limited tenure, Know Thy Dog is
receiving positive client feedback, Engel says.
“We give out my personal cell phone number
and people text me all the time wanting
pictures and updates of their dog,” she said,
pointing to a sense of relief she gets from
clients. “From their messages back, they’re
just like ‘Thank God you exist!’ We hear that
a lot.”
Know Thy Dog offers a shuttle service for dog
owners in Big Sky and the Yellowstone Club,
and the operators fully expect to keep growing
the business.
When asked what gives her energy on a daily
basis, Engel says she feeds off her clients’
happiness. “It’s helping people and helping
dogs to be able to live their best life together.”
Visit knowthydogtraining.com for more
information on training, boarding and doggy
day care.
Four-legged patron, Sweet Pea, enjoys some play time at the
boarding facility.
Kelly Engel, left, and Mandy Britton pose with the family of miniature blue heelers that assist in the daily operations of Know Thy Dog.
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SPORTS
Jan. 23 - Feb. 5, 2015 23
24 Jan. 23 - Feb. 5, 2015
THE EDDY LINE
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BUSINESS
Explore Big Sky
Jan. 23 - Feb. 5, 2015 25
Katabatic Brewing blows into downtown Livingston
STORY AND PHOTOS BY
TYLER ALLEN
EXPLORE BIG SKY SENIOR EDITOR
LIVINGSTON – Walking into Katabatic Brewing
Co. on West Park Street in Livingston, one is
struck by the taproom’s expansive space. The calm
air inside may strike you as well.
A katabatic is a “cold, downslope wind that’s
common on glaciers, ice fields, Antarctica and
Livingston,” says Brice Jones, brewery co-owner
and self-proclaimed weather geek. Jones was a
smokejumper for a number of years and operated
a yurt skiing operation outside of Seeley Lake
until he sold it in 2007. Both occupations kept
him closely tuned in to the weather and wind.
Brice and his wife LaNette opened Katabatic
on Sept. 17 after moving to Livingston from
Missoula in July 2013, intent on opening a
brewery.
“I really like the area, the recreational
opportunities, and the town,” LaNette said.
“We started doing our research and wanted to
go somewhere where the craft brewery market
wasn’t inundated.”
The two Montana natives began renovations on
the space in November 2013, completely gutting
the 1882 building. It’s been home to a soda
shop, coffee shop and, in recent years, a string
of Chinese restaurants. The space housed the
Longbranch Saloon in the 1960s and ‘70s, and
the couple says a lot of people tell them stories
from those days, many happy to see the location
serving beer and hosting music again.
That was apparent on a recent Monday night,
when the taproom was packed with revelers
enjoying the weekly bluegrass jam. Katabatic also
hosts live music
acts Wednesday and
Saturday evenings,
and on Tuesdays
donates a dollar
from each beer sold
to a local nonprofit.
They advertise a
board-game night
every Sunday – for
kids and adults alike
– when families
raid the toy box for
Battleship, Chutes
and Ladders, and
Bananagrams, a fastpaced word game.
“We wanted to
create a community
hub, someplace to
go to socialize with
your neighbor,”
Brice said.
“Somehow we’ve
been able to do that.
People come down
with a buddy, solo
or with big parties.”
The brewery
offers three or four
seasonal rotators,
but tries to keep
LaNette and Brice Jones opened Livingston’s Katabatic Brewing Co. in September.
four signature beers
on tap at all times,
recently moved back after 10 years in Missoula.
including their “Katabatic” American Pale Ale,
“I’ve done a bit of traveling and I’m drawn to
Hefeweizen and Scotch Ale. The fourth is the
breweries wherever I go – this place is really
“Katabatic IPA.”
good.”
“I’m a huge IPA fan and this is spot on,” said
Jennifer Neville, who grew up in Livingston and
The operation may be young, but has already
received accolades at November’s Harvest
Montana Brewfest held in Great Falls. Katabatic
earned a silver medal for its IPA and a gold for a
Double Danger Imperial IPA. It’s not surprising
though, as Head Brewer Jason Courtney brought
an award-winning pedigree with him from
Bangor, Maine. The East Coast transplant won
five Great American Beer Festival medals as a
brewer at Gheagan’s Pub & Craft Brewery.
Katabatic’s space is open and inviting. A long,
“L”-shaped bar dominates the southwest wall,
which shows the exposed, original brick – the
couple lacquered it four times to keep the dust
from crumbling onto patrons. The northeast
wall is covered with reclaimed wood from a
snow fence in Belgrade and an old barn outside
of Bozeman. Custom metalwork accents many of
the tables and fixtures, and the bar’s foot rail is a
Montana Rail Link train track rail out of a yard in
Livingston.
The wall facing the street is dominated by a giant,
glassed garage door that they open “when the
windy season is over,” according to LaNette.
With all the work the couple has put into the
building, Katabatic Brewing Co. has a decidedly
new age, rustic feel. The beauty of the space is
only rivaled by the taste of your first pint.
Katabatic hosts an open bluegrass jam every Monday night.
26 Jan. 23 - Feb. 5, 2015
SPORTS
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Really. Good. Beer.
(and food...)
48 Market Place | Big Sky, MT 59716 | 406.995.3939 | lonepeakbrewery.com
EST. 1997
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SPORTS
Jan. 23 - Feb. 5, 2015 27
The Bough-Dolan Athletic Center was packed on Jan. 16 for the games against the
rival Wolverines. PHOTOS BY JILL BOUGH
Young fans help rally the Big Horns to home court wins for both the girls’ and boys’
varsity teams. It was the Lady Big Horns’ first ever win against West Yellowstone.
Big Horns bank wins
over rival Wolverines
Notch big victories
versus Lima
BY EXPLORE BIG SKY STAFF
LPHS Senior Cooper Shea attempts a leaping pass during the Jan. 17 victory
over Lima.
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BIG SKY – The Bough-Dolan Athletic Center at Lone Peak High School was
filled with enthusiastic fans on Jan. 16 as both the boys’ and girls’ varsity basketball teams defeated their West Yellowstone rivals. The boys finished with a 53-39
victory over the Wolverines, and Justin McKillop led the LPHS scoring attack
with 13 points.
The Lady Big Horns’ first ever win versus West Yellowstone ended 46-33 for the
home team, with Dasha Bough putting up 14 points and Louisa Locker adding 12
for LPHS.
The girls’ team came storming onto their home court against Lima on Jan. 17,
with Bough (16 points) and Locker (13 points) leading the scoring charge for a second straight night, as LPHS won in commanding fashion, 57-31. Bianca Godoy
added 11 for the Lady Big Horns, which improved their conference record to 3-5.
The boys’ team took the court with equal enthusiasm Saturday night notching a
64-46 win over the Bears. After the Big Horns took a 13-point lead into the half,
Lima opened up the second with a 21-7 run and held a 1-point lead at the end of
the third quarter. LPHS applied a full court defense throughout the fourth quarter, forcing numerous turnovers during a 29-10 run.
Sophomore Eddie Starz set a new LPHS boys’ single-game scoring record with
28 points, and senior Quinn House added a double-double with 13 points and 16
rebounds. The Big Horns improved to 4-3 in the conference with the weekend
sweep.
LPHS basketball travels to Harrison/Willow Creek on Jan. 23 and returns home
Jan. 24 to host Sheridan. The Big Horns will be in Big Sky Jan. 30 to take on
Shields Valley and travel to Gardiner Jan. 31.
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SPORTS
Explore Big Sky
Jan. 23 - Feb. 5, 2015 29
BSSEF U16 comp at Red Lodge Mountain Resort
Big Sky Ski Education Foundation’s A-U16 racers showed up strong to Red Lodge Mountain Resort from Jan. 17-19 to compete in giant slalom and slalom
events. Alexa Coyle nabbed third place on day one and second place on day two in giant slalom, then finished fourth in the slalom race on Jan. 19.
Mackenzie and Madison Winters each finished in 15th place in the giant slalom on days one and two, respectively, while Mackenzie scored 12th and Madison
finished 13th in the slalom competition on day three.
The BSSEF Youth Ski Team takes to its home slopes at Big Sky Resort Jan. 24-25. – J.T.O.
Kyle Willis drives around a gate at the Red Lodge U-16 A Qualifiers. PHOTOS BY JEFF LINKENBACH
Annika Linkenbach and Mackenzie Winters rest their legs on the chairlift up.
Sam Johnson crests a rollover against the deep blue sky at Red Lodge.
Maci St Cyr looks ahead as prepares to transition edges.
30 Jan. 23 - Feb. 5, 2015
HEALTH
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HEALTH
Jan. 23 - Feb. 5, 2015 31
HEALTH
‘First do no harm’
Using affirmations to
change behavior
BY JACKIE RAINFORD CORCORAN
EXPLORE BIG SKY HEALTH COLUMNIST
Graduating from health coaching
school in June of 2013 did not
award me a perfectly disciplined
diet and lifestyle. I still wrestle with
unhealthy habits like drinking too
much red wine and coffee, allowing
my body to become dehydrated and
not managing my time well.
and to get back to a more natural
way of eating and living. It’s worth
noting that the Latin root of the word
doctor is “teacher,” and physician is
“naturalist.”
With a constant drive to live life to
its full potential, I recently wrote
down my shortcomings and what
needs to happen to overcome these
hurdles. During this writing exercise,
the phrase “First do no harm” kept
coming up. Not being entirely sure of
its origin, I Googled it.
“With regard to healing the sick, I
will devise and order for them the
best diet, according to my judgment
and means; and I will take care that
they suffer no hurt or damage.
The phrase “First do no harm”
is often mistaken as part of the
Hippocratic Oath – an oath often
taken by physicians upon graduation
of medical school – but appeared in
medical literature much later than
Hippocrates’ time.
The gist of the meaning is that a
patient’s wellbeing is a physician’s
primary concern. What if physicians
prescribed “First do no harm” instead
of doling out pharmaceuticals that
often have side effects worse than the
ailment they’re treating? This would
be a game changer.
According to a 2009 Centers for
Disease Control and Prevention study
called “The Power of Prevention,”
available on its website, the U.S.
spends more than 75 percent of its
health care budget on people with
chronic conditions including high
blood pressure, type 2 diabetes, heart
disease, depression, alzheimers,
arthritis and osteoporisis.
“These persistent conditions – the
nation’s leading causes of death and
disability – leave in their wake deaths
that could have been prevented,
lifelong disability, compromised
quality of life, and burgeoning health
care costs,” the study reports. Instead of first prescribing a pill for a
chronic condition, imagine physicians
educating their patients to remove
from their diet and lifestyle that
which is slowly killing them
Interestingly, lines from the original
Hippocratic Oath say:
Sunday, February 8
BIG SKY COMMISSION
Presented by
“Nor shall any man’s entreaty prevail
upon me to administer poison to
anyone; neither will I counsel any
man to do so.”
Clearly, Western medicine has
strayed from this advice.
As a 45-year-old health coach who
wants to stay off medications and
prevent chronic disease, I’m forced
to look at the decades of accumulated
toxins in my body due to poor diet
and lifestyle choices. Today, I enjoy
a healthy diet of mostly homemade
organic meals and I love to exercise.
But how long can this lifestyle
counterbalance the harm caused by
my addictions and habits?
So now, posted next to my bathroom
sink, is a note reminding me to “First
do no harm.”
Regularly reading this puts a negative
spin on actions that I used to consider
“rewards” like coffee first thing every
morning and red wine after work. It’s
rewiring my brain and psyche to view
them as potentially toxic because I
have allowed them to become habit
forming and addictive. This new
perception is gradually helping me
make real changes.
Jackie Rainford Corcoran is an IIN
Certified Holistic Health Coach, an
NASM Certified Personal Trainer,
a public speaker and health activist.
Contact her at [email protected],
or find more at thetahealth.org.
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EVENTS
Explore Big Sky
Smash Life1 at Big Sky Resort p.39
Jan. 23 - Feb. 5, 2015 33
Solid skiing on rocky slopes p.42
Section 3:
OUTDOORS &
ENTERTAINMENT
'The Last Glacier' p. 48
Celebrate backcountry safety
Avalanche Forecasters’ Beer Social Fundraiser is Jan. 27
BY TYLER ALLEN
EXPLORE BIG SKY SENIOR EDITOR
BOZEMAN – Montana-made beer will
be paired with regionally sourced food for
Gallatin Valley gastronomes on Jan. 27,
during the Avalanche Forecasters’ Beer
Social Fundraiser at Bozeman’s Montana Ale
Works.
The seventh annual Friends of the
Gallatin National Forest Avalanche Center
fundraiser will feature distinctive beer from
Bayern Brewing, Bitter Root Brewery and
Red Lodge Ales Brewing Company, paired
with the imaginative dishes of Ale Works
Executive Chef Anthony Calkins.
Duck confit crepes with poached pears and
mascarpone will match Red Lodge Ullrfest
Lager, while the restaurant’s house-made
pork sausage with bagel chips and preserved
lemon mustard will complement Bayern’s
Doppelbock.
Calkins uses Montana ingredients whenever
possible, he said, and while he has more
experience pairing food with wine, a beer
pairing just makes sense at this restaurant.
“We’re Montana Ale Works, so why not pair
[food] with beer?” Calkins said. “In Montana
there’s a lot of unique, food-friendly beers and
it’s always fun to try something new.”
Joe Barnett, the restaurant’s bar manager for the
last eight years, is constantly seeking something
new for the bar’s extensive tap beer selection.
His passion for keeping the brewer’s rotator
selections fresh and different has connected him
with breweries around the state and Mountain
West.
“I wanted to get outside of the Gallatin Valley
a little bit [this year],” Barnett said. “They were
the first three breweries I reached out to and all
said ‘yes’ right away.”
The intent is to join seasonal beer with seasonal
food, Barnett said, who worked with the chefs to
showcase flavor combinations, finding beer that
is complementary to the sauces featured in each
particular dish.
All three brewers will be on hand to talk about
the beer they’re bringing to Bozeman that night.
One of those brewers is Jason Goeltz, general
manager of Hamilton’s Bitter Root Brewery, who
will release the season’s first keg of Red Dread at
the event, a month before it’s sold anywhere else.
Bozeman’s Montana Ale Works on Jan. 27 will host its seventh annual fundraiser for the Friends of the Gallatin
National Forest Avalanche Center. PHOTO COURTESY OF MONTANA ALE WORKS
The 8.2 percent imperial red IPA has nine
specialty malts along with Montana-based malt,
and is “ridiculously dry hopped with Simcoe and
Citra hops … [and] has a big, chewy malt body,”
Goeltz said.
Goeltz is also bringing his 2014 Harvest Ale,
brewed entirely with Montana ingredients,
including Chinook and Cascade hops from the
Bitterroot Valley, with local cider and cherries.
While the mountains around Hamilton are not
part of the GNFAC forecast area, Goeltz is a
level one avalanche instructor, fundraises for his
local avalanche center and is excited to support
southwest Montana’s avalanche forecasters.
“Backcountry skiing and safety is near and dear
to my heart,” he said. “The Bozeman community
has been incredibly supportive of our beer and
the [avalanche] center has been supportive of the
ski community there.”
Montana Ale Works has a long tradition of
supporting causes they’re passionate about,
according to managing partner Roth Jordan.
The restaurant doesn’t advertise in print or
other media; instead, it uses its community
partnership series for grassroots advertising,
connecting with local nonprofits.
Roth sits on the board of the Livingston-based
Western Sustainability Exchange, which
connects farms to restaurants, to keep locally
made products in the state and encourages
restaurants to use them.
“One of the reasons we decided to start doing it
this way is we can reach more people,” he said.
“It’s more ‘friendraising’ than fundraising.”
The forecasters’ fundraiser began as a winepairing dinner but shifted to beer two years
ago to appeal to a broader range of community
members.
The Jan. 27 event will have more of a social
atmosphere than years past, according to Barnett.
The dinner will be hosted in the pool table area
at the east end of the building, as opposed to
one of the intimate side rooms where it’s been in
previous years.
“This one’s going to be a big departure from what
we’ve done in the past,” Barnett said. “It’s going
to feel more like a beer fest than a wine dinner.”
Fifty tickets will be sold for two different seatings
at 5 and 7 p.m. In addition to the brewers, the
GNFAC forecasters will be on hand to socialize
and answer questions about this year’s snowpack.
Visit mtavalanche.com for more information or to
purchase tickets.
34 Jan. 23 - Feb. 5, 2015
EVENTS
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Explore Big Sky
Snobar: Big Sky Resort’s slopeside outdoor nightclub
BIG SKY – Walls of snow, a dazzling array of
lights and lasers, bartenders in parkas, and one
raging DJ is Big Sky Resort’s famous Snobar. The
party got started Jan. 17 and returns to the resort
on Saturday, Jan. 24 from 5-9 p.m. This 21-andolder event is held next to Swifty 2.0 Terrain Park,
above the base of the Swift Current chairlift.
Every year, Big Sky Resort’s terrain park crew
changes this venue built entirely out of snow, with
a roughly 12 foot, lighted ceiling. Bozeman’s DJ 5
Star pumps the dance music as people show their
moves in ski boots, snowboard boots, or any shoe
they can get down with on the snow.
“Snobar is uniquely Big Sky Resort,” said Anna
Husted, Big Sky Resort’s event manager. “It’s one
of those signature events you can’t experience
anywhere else in Montana, and few other places on
earth. It’s a bucket list event for anyone.”
The Snobar party heats up at 9:30 p.m. in Whiskey
Jack’s, as DJ 5 Star continues pumping the jams
indoors, keeping revelers spinning on the dance
floor.
Visit www.bigskyresort.com/events for more
information.
The icy venue was quickly filled with partygoers on Jan. 17, ready to enjoy the stimulating sounds of the DJs’
build-ups and bass-drops. PHOTOS BY WES OVERVOLD
Go-go dancers delighted the Snobar fans with their moon boots
and LED-illuminated jump suits.
A number of fire-wielding performers accompanied the DJ’s throughout the night.
The fire performers occasionally took to the top of the wall,
above the dancing crowd.
EVENTS
Jan. 23 - Feb. 5, 2015 35
WANDER AT REST
Ninth annual Big Sky Big Grass
Festival at Big Sky Resort
BY SHEILA CHAPMAN
BIG SKY RESORT PR MANAGER
BIG SKY – Bluegrass slides into Big
Sky Resort Feb. 5-8 for the ninth
annual Big Sky Big Grass Festival,
with Leftover Salmon kicking
off the festival on Thursday at
Whiskey Jack’s. This long running
festival will be held in multiple
locations throughout Big Sky
Resort.
Opening for Della Mae are Billy
Strings and Don Julin.
The picking continues on Saturday
in the Missouri Ballroom with The
Travelin’ McCourys, the sons of
bluegrass legend Del McCoury.
Della Mae will open for their
encore performance. The Grant
Farm Band, led by the National
Flatpicking Guitar Champion Tyler
Grant, will be playing at Whiskey
Jack’s with the The Good Time
The Lil’ Smokies perform at Whiskey Jack’s during the 2014 Big Sky Big Grass
festival. PHOTO BY TYLER ALLEN
Starting Friday, Feb. 6, through
Sunday are free shows beginning
at 4 p.m. in the Carabiner Lounge,
Whiskey Jack’s, and Chet’s
Lounge featuring Two Bit Franks,
Driftwood Grinners, The Good
Time Travelers, Kitchen Dwellers,
Jawbone Railroad, Dodgy
Mountain Men, Billy Strings &
Don Julin, and Tyler Grant.
Headlining Friday night in the
Missouri Ballroom is the John
Jorgenson Bluegrass Band (J2B2),
led by music virtuoso John
Jorgenson. Known for his blistering
guitar and mandolin licks, which
earned him a reputation as a worldclass musician, Jorgenson has
collaborated with the likes of Earl
Scruggs, Bonnie Raitt, Elton John,
Luciano Pavarotti and Bob Dylan,
among others. Opening for J2B2 is
the famous bluegrass fiddler Darol
Anger.
The all-female bluegrass band,
Della Mae will headline at Whiskey
Jack’s that night with their
powerful vocals, instrumentals and
songwriting talent.
Travelers opening. Darol Anger
and the Furies will give an intimate
performance in the Talus Room.
On Sunday, the festivities will
begin at 8:30 a.m. with a Big Grass
Gospel Jam in the Talus Room.
Closing out the festival in the
Missouri Ballroom will be Leftover
Salmon, blending aggressive
bluegrass, rock, country and Cajun/
Zydeco – or as Leftover Salmon calls
it, “Polyethnic Cajun Slamgrass.”
Two Bit Franks will open the show.
Headlining in Whiskey Jack’s that
night will be Pert Near Sandstone
from Minneapolis/St. Paul, Minn.
Bozeman’s own Kitchen Dwellers
will be the opening band.
Jayme Stone’s Lomax Project and
The Good Time Travelers will play
an intimate performance in the
Talus Room.
Visit bigskyresort.com/biggrass
for information on tickets, show
times, bundle options, and lodging
packages.
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36 Jan. 23 - Feb. 5, 2015
EVENTS CALENDAR
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PLANNING AN EVENT? LET US KNOW! EMAIL [email protected], AND WE’LL SPREAD THE WORD.
FRIDAY, JAN. 23 –
THURSDAY, FEB. 5
*If your event falls
between Feb. 6 and Feb.
19, please submit it by
Wednesday, Jan. 28.
BIG SKY
FRIDAY, JAN. 23
Live Music at Carabiner
Lauren Regnier & Jeff
Bellino, 4-6 p.m.
Julia Roberts, 8:30-11 p.m.
Live Music @ Whiskey
Jack’s
Kent Johnson, 3:30-5:30 p.m.
Milton Menasco Band,
9:30 p.m.
Mike Haring
Chet’s Bar, 4:30-6 p.m.
Fish Camp Boys
Riverhouse, 6:30 p.m.
Lauren Jackson
Ousel & Spur, 9-11 p.m.
Electric Sunday
Choppers, 9:30 p.m.
SATURDAY, JAN. 24
Yoga From the Inside Out
One-day Retreat w/
Nancy Ruby
Santosha Wellness Center,
10 a.m. – 6 p.m.
Live Music at Carabiner
Lone Mountain Trio, 4-6 p.m.
Two Bit Franks, 8:30-11 p.m.
SnoBar w/DJ 5 Star
Big Sky Resort, 5 p.m.
Tom Marino
Choppers, 5:50 p.m.
Sugar Daddies
Riverhouse, 7:30 p.m.
DJ Shawn
Black Bear, 10 p.m.
SUNDAY, JAN. 25
Worship service – All Saints
in Big Sky
Right Rev. C. Franklin
Brookhart
Big Sky Chapel, 9:30 a.m.
Texas Hold ‘Em Poker
Riverhouse, 4 p.m.
MONDAY, JAN. 26
Dan Dubuque
Whiskey Jack’s,
3:30-5:30 p.m.
Texas Hold ‘Em Poker
Riverhouse, 4 p.m.
Montana Exit
Carabiner, 4-6 p.m.
Diamond
Chet’s Bar, 4:30-6 p.m.
DJ Mountjoy
Black Bear, 10 p.m.
Live Music at Whiskey
Jack’s
Brian and Ben, 3:30-5:30 p.m.
DJ 5 Star, 9:30 p.m.
TUESDAY, JAN. 27
Mike Haring
Whiskey Jack’s,
3:30-5:30 p.m.
Dos Mayos
Chet’s Bar, 4:30-6 p.m.
Live Music at Carabiner
Kenny Diamond, 4-6 p.m.
Lauren Regnier,
8:30-11 p.m.
Open Mic Night
By WOM, 10 p.m.
Nobody
Black Bear, 10 p.m.
WEDNESDAY, JAN. 28
Ric & Linda
Whiskey Jack’s,
3:30-5:30 p.m.
SATURDAY, JAN. 31
Ski Joring
320 Guest Ranch, 1 p.m.
Diamond
Chet’s Bar, 4:30-6 p.m.
Live Music at Carabiner
Kevin Fabozzi, 4-6 p.m.
Mike Haring, 8:30-11 p.m.
Fashion Show
Summit Hotel, 6 p.m.
Karaoke
Broken Spoke, 10 p.m.
THURSDAY, JAN. 29
Load Bearing Walls
Whiskey Jack’s,
3:30-5:30 p.m.
Milton Menasco Duo
Chet’s Bar, 4:30-6 p.m.
Live Music at Carabiner
Mike Haring, 4-6 p.m.
Kevin Fabozzi, 8:30-11 p.m.
FRIDAY, JAN. 30
Live Music at Whiskey
Jack’s
Kent Johnson, 3:30-5:30 p.m.
Riot Act, 9:30 p.m.
Lauren Regnier & Jeff
Bellino
Carabiner, 4-6 p.m.
Mike Haring
Chet’s Bar, 4:30-6 p.m.
Fabozzi
Riverhouse, 6 p.m.
Jeff Bellino
Ousel & Spur, 9-11 p.m.
Live Music at Carabiner
Montana Exit, 4-6 p.m.
John Derado, 8:30-11 p.m.
Texas Hold ‘Em Poker
Riverhouse, 4 p.m.
Live Music at Whiskey
Jack’s
Brian and Ben, 3:30-5:30 p.m.
Bottom of the Barrel,
9:30 p.m.
Diamond
Chet’s Bar, 4:30-6 p.m.
Lone Mountain Trio
Carabiner, 4-6 p.m.
TUESDAY, FEB. 3
Free Ski Clinic
Big Sky Resort,
Dos Mayos
Chet’s Bar, 4:30-6 p.m.
Mike D.
Choppers, 5:30 p.m.
Rocky Mountain Pearls
Riverhouse, 7 p.m.
Cold Hard Cash
320 Guest Ranch, 8 p.m.
One Leaf Clover
Broken Spoke, 9:30 p.m.
SUNDAY, FEB. 1
Ski Joring
320 Guest Ranch, 11 a.m.
Super Bowl Party
Whiskey Jack’s, 3:30 p.m.
Karaoke
Black Bear, 9 p.m.
Mike Haring
Whiskey Jack’s,
3:30-5:30 p.m.
Live Music at Carabiner
Kenny Diamond, 4-6 p.m.
Lauren Regnier,
8:30-11 p.m.
Milton Menasco Duo
Chet’s Bar, 4:30-6 p.m.
Open Mic Night
By WOM, 10 p.m.
WEDNESDAY, FEB. 4
Ric Steinke
Whiskey Jack’s,
3:30-5:30 p.m.
Milton Menasco Duo
Chet’s Bar, 4:30-6 p.m.
John Derado
Carabiner, 8:30-11 p.m.
Leftover Salmon
Whiskey Jack’s, 9:30
p.m.
BOZEMAN
FRIDAY, JAN. 23
Movie Night
Bozeman Dharma
Center, 7 p.m.
Trivia Night: Harry Potter
The Ellen, 7 p.m.
Young Ah-Tak Recital
MSU Reynolds Recital
Hall, 7:30 p.m.
Bozeman Ice Dogs
Hockey
Haynes Pavilion,
7:30 p.m.
“Take My Wi-Fi Please!”
The Verge, 8 p.m.
Mighty Flick
Eagles, 9 p.m.
Lil Smokies
Filling Station, 9 p.m.
Super Bowl Party
Black Bear, 3:30 p.m.
Live Music at Carabiner
John Derado, 4-6 p.m.
Mike Haring, 8:30-11 p.m.
SATURDAY, JAN. 24
Rocket Car Day
Bozeman Makerspace,
10 a.m.
Texas Hold ‘Em Poker
Riverhouse, 4 p.m.
Diamond
Chet’s Bar, 4:30-6 p.m.
Aran Buzzas
406 Brewing, 4-6 p.m.
MONDAY, FEB. 2
Free Ski Clinic
Big Sky Resort,
Karaoke
Broken Spoke, 10 p.m.
Open Mic Night
Wild Joe’s, 7 p.m.
THURSDAY, FEB. 5
Ribbon Cutting
Horse of a Different Color,
5-7 p.m.
Audrey Hepburn in Funny
Face
The Ellen, 7:30 p.m.
Dan Dubuque
Whiskey Jack’s,
3:30-5:30 p.m.
“Take My Wi-Fi Please!”
The Verge, 8 p.m.
FOR SALE
2006 Toyota Tundra double cab SR5 TRD Off Road. One owner, great
condition and clean title with no lien.
-4.7L V8 Engine
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-Tonneau Cover
-Automatic transmission
-148k miles
-AM/FM CD and Tape
-Power windows (power rear window)
-Power Locks
-Bucket Front Seats
-$12,900 OBO
Call 406-580-1583
HELP WANTED
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experience required. Applicants can submit resumes to [email protected]
Please email or call us at 406-993-2666 for further information.
explorebigsky.com
Intergalactic Troubadors
& Booze Hounds
Filler, 9 p.m.
GNFAC Fundraiser
Montana Ale Works,
5 & 7 p.m.
Homeless Shelter
Fundraiser
Various Artists
The Zebra, 9 p.m.
WEDNESDAY, JAN. 28
“The Experience and
Science of Mental Illness”
The Emerson, 7 p.m.
Open Mic
Haufbrau, 10:30 p.m.
Sweetbacks
Haufbrau, 10 p.m.
SUNDAY, JAN. 25
Tribal Seeds
The Filler, 8 p.m.
Open Mic
Haufbrau, 10 p.m.
MONDAY, JAN. 26
Pints w/Purpose
Bridger Brewing, 5 p.m.
THURSDAY, JAN. 29
Al Cooper
Lockhorn Cider, 7 p.m.
James Reid, Guitar
Reynolds Recital Hall,
7:30 p.m.
Jeremy Morton Trio
Bacchus, 9-11 p.m.
Improv on the Verge
The Verge, 7 p.m.
FRIDAY, JAN. 30
Celebration of the Arts
The Emerson, 6 p.m.
Bridger Creek Boys
Colonel Black’s, 7 p.m.
Oscar Nominated Shorts
The Ellen, 7 & 9 p.m.
Denine LeBlanc, Piano
Reynolds Recital Hall,
7:30 p.m.
Quenby & West of
Wayland
Eagles Lodge, 9 p.m.
Trivia Night
Bacchus, 8 p.m.
Bigsby Jones w/Bent
Bones
The Zebra, 9 p.m.
Sophistafunk
Filler, 9 p.m.
Open Mic
Haufbrau, 10:30 p.m.
TUESDAY, JAN. 27
Cribbage Night
Eagles Lodge, 6 p.m.
EVENTS CALENDAR
Explore Big Sky
SATURDAY, JAN. 31
Oscar Nominated Shorts
The Ellen, 1-4 p.m.
Kane’s River
The Ellen, 8 p.m.
Fly Fishing Film Tour
The Emerson, 7 p.m.
SUNDAY, FEB. 1
Open Ukulele Jam
Bozeman Library,
1-3 p.m.
The Great Gatsby
The Ellen, 7:30 p.m.
Open Mic
Haufbrau, 10:30 p.m.
Sean Devine
Bacchus, 8-10 p.m.
MONDAY, FEB. 2
Pints w/Purpose
Bridger Brewing, 5 p.m.
Jan. 23 - Feb. 5, 2015 37
Bridger Creek Boys
Colonel Black’s, 7 p.m.
GrooveWax
Chico Saloon, 9:30 p.m.
Tucker Down
Chico Saloon, 9:30 p.m.
Snowshoe Walk w/YNP
Ranger
Visitor Center, 10 a.m.
Trivia
Bacchus, 8 p.m.
SATURDAY, JAN. 24
Dan Dubuque
Katabatik Brewing,
SATURDAY, JAN. 31
David Lansverk
Katabatik Brewing,
Avalanche Awareness
Presentation
Holiday Inn, 7-8 p.m.
Double Barrel
Murray Bar, 9 p.m.
Paul Lee Kupfer
Murray Bar, 9 p.m.
Tucker Down
Chico Saloon, 9:30 p.m.
SUNDAY, JAN. 25
Wild West Winterfest
Island Park, 9:30 a.m.
Open Mic
Haufbrau, 10:30 p.m.
TUESDAY, FEB. 3
Cribbage Night
Eagles, 6 p.m.
GrooveWax
Chico Saloon, 9:30 p.m.
Dan Dubuque
Bacchus, 8-10 p.m.
WEDNESDAY, FEB. 4
Celebrating 50 Years of
the Craighead Inst.
The Emerson, 6 p.m.
Muir String Quartet
Reynolds Recital Hall,
7 p.m.
Brothers Gow + MOTH
Filler, 9 p.m.
Open Mic
Haufbrau, 10:30 p.m.
THURSDAY, FEB. 5
Bozeman Ice Dogs
Hockey
Haynes Pavilion,
7:30 p.m.
LIVINGSTON &
PARADISE VALLEY
FRIDAY, JAN. 23
Book Reading
Elk River Books, 7 p.m.
Someday Miss Pray
The Mint, 9:30 p.m.
MONDAY, JAN. 26
Bluegrass Jam
Katabatik Brewing,
5:30 p.m.
Jay’s Lounge
Murray Bar, 8 p.m.
TUESDAY, JAN. 27
Taco Tuesday w/Swingley
Jazz
The Mint, 6:30 p.m.
WEDNESDAY, JAN. 28
Jacob Lilley & Forest
Service
Katabatik Brewing,
5:30 p.m.
Bingo Night
The Mint, 6 p.m.
Tom Georges
Bacchus, 9-11 p.m.
Skavocado
Murray Bar, 9 p.m.
StrangeWays
KGLT Benefit
The Mint, 9:30 p.m.
Al Cooper
Murray Bar, 8:30 p.m.
THURSDAY, JAN. 29
Ladies Night w/DJ Mike
Murray Bar, 8:30 p.m.
StrangeWays
The Mint, 9 p.m.
FRIDAY, JAN. 30
Bad Betty Organ Combo
Murray Bar, 9 p.m.
Hooligans
The Mint, 9:30 p.m.
Dirt w/Scotty Nelson
The Mint
MONDAY, FEB. 2
Jay’s Lounge
Murray Bar, 8 p.m.
Open Mic Night
The Mint,
TUESDAY, FEB. 3
Taco Tuesday w/Swingley
Jazz
The Mint, 6:30 p.m.
WEDNESDAY, FEB. 4
Bingo Night
The Mint, 6 p.m.
Dan Dubuque
Murray Bar, 8:30 p.m.
THURSDAY, FEB. 5
Ladies Night w/DJ Mike
Murray Bar, 8:30 p.m.
StrangeWays
The Mint, 9 p.m.
WEST YELLOWSTONE
FRIDAY, JAN. 23
Wild West Winterfest
Island Park, 6 p.m.
The Dirty Shame
Wild West Saloon, 9 p.m.
SATURDAY, JAN. 24
Wild West Winterfest
Island Park, 8 a.m.
Snowshoe Walk w/YNP
Ranger
Visitor Center, 10 a.m.
THURSDAY, JAN. 29
Fish Camp Boys
Wild West Saloon, 7 p.m.
FRIDAY, JAN. 30
SnoWest 40th Anniversary
Party
Various Locations, 9 a.m.
The Kind
Wild West Saloon, 9 p.m.
SATURDAY, JAN. 31
SnoWest 40th Anniversary
Party
Various Locations, 9 a.m.
Snowshoe Walk w/YNP
Ranger
Visitor Center, 10 a.m.
Afternoon Park w/YNP
Ranger
Grizzly Wolf & Discovery
Center, 2 p.m.
Avalanche Awareness
Presentation
Holiday Inn, 7-8 p.m.
SUNDAY, FEB. 1
Snowshoe Walk w/YNP
Ranger
Visitor Center, 10 a.m.
Afternoon Park w/YNP
Ranger
Grizzly Wolf & Discovery
Center, 2 p.m.
MONDAY, FEB. 2
“IPSSSDR” Sled Dog
Races
Yellowstone Ave., 9 a.m.
2115 Little Coyote
4 bedroom/4bath
$549,000 MLS #201505
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Elk Ridge Ranch Lot 28
39 +/- acres
$399,000 MLS #197670
271 Village Center @ Big Sky Resort
Studio/1 bath
$299,000 MLS #148787
38 Jan. 23 - Feb. 5, 2015
WANDERER AT REST
explorebigsky.com
Explore Big Sky
Wanderer at Rest
A pizza and French fries update: Gnar pow!
BY JAMIE BALKE
EXPLORE BIG SKY COLUMNIST
It finally happened! I worked up the courage to go
downhill skiing in Montana.
This is my fifth winter living in Bozeman, and with
an illogical fear of downhill skiing in the Rockies, I
had avoided it like the plague. It was mostly due to
a lack of experience, as well as my technique, which
is limited to the pizza and French fry positions
typically taught to children.
My long avoidance of alpine skiing west of the
Mississippi led me to purchase both snowshoes
and cross-country skis. For several years now, my
brother John has tried to convince me to reconsider
my fear and hit the slopes. Using a recent birthday
as leverage, John took me skiing at Big Sky Resort as
a gift.
I prepared by visualizing the many ways I would
likely embarrass myself, including falling off
chairlifts, and brainstorming funny things that I
could say to ski patrollers towing my broken body
off of the hill. Optimism has never been my strong
suit.
Resigned to my impending doom, I jumped in John’s
truck and we began the drive to Big Sky. Along the
way, we saw three bald eagles feeding on a carcass
alongside the road, a deer on an island in the middle
of the Gallatin River, and a big horn sheep hanging
out in the road. The day was off to a good start.
John explained upon our arrival that the Explorer
chairlift would be a good place to start. As I
surveyed the area, adults with fear clouding their
eyes intermingled with small children taking ski
lessons. I was among my people.
that on a few of the steeper areas I found myself
narrating pep talks aloud about how it would be
okay, and I could just fall over if needed.
Right off the bat, I somehow missed getting on the
same chair as my brother, and awkwardly made it on
the one behind him. From this vantage, I was able
to survey the fairly mellow looking hill, and was
relieved to observe that I wouldn’t be alone in my
heavy reliance on the pizza wedge. It was a beautiful
snowy day, with fog moving dramatically around
the mountain.
As the day went on, I discovered my fear
of downhill skiing in Montana was mostly
unwarranted, and had a fantastic time hanging
out with my brother on a breathtakingly beautiful
mountain. The next time something freaks me out, I
won’t wait years to give it a go.
I made it off the
chairlift without too
much fuss, and began
the descent. I was
pleasantly surprised to
hear the lift attendant
shout that I shouldn’t
worry because skiing
is like riding a bike. It
was kind of true. The
limited skills I picked
up on a few ski days in
Wisconsin and North
Carolina came back,
and before long I was
actually having fun.
After a couple runs
with my fellow
“Explorers,” John
suggested we ski green
runs on other areas of
the mountain. It went
pretty well, except
Balke hopes to “shred the gnar” on some green runs
again soon.
After honing her skills on the Explorer chairlift, Jamie Balke braved some of the
steeper green runs at Big Sky Resort. OUTLAW PARTNERS PHOTO
Bringing you closer to Santosha (contentment) today...
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406-993-2510 • 169 Snowy Mountain Circle • Big Sky, Montana
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SUNDAY
MONDAY
TUESDAY
WEDNESDAY
THURSDAY
FRIDAY
SATURDAY
10-11am
All Levels Adult
Ballet
8-8:45am
Sound Bath
Meditation
9-10:15am
All Levels Yoga
6-7am
All Levels Yoga
9-10:15am
All Levels Yoga
5:30-6:30pm
Gentle Yoga
7-8pm
Awareness
Wednesday (2nd
Wed of the Month)
7-8am
All Levels Yoga
8:15-9:15am
Pilates
9:30-10:45am
All Levels Yoga
8:30-9:30am
Level II Yoga
5-6:15pm
All Levels Yoga
7-8am
All Levels Yoga
8:15-9:15am
Pilates
9:30-10:45am
1/24: 10am-6pm
Yoga from the
Inside Out retreat
with Nancy Ruby
(no classes)
6-7:15pm
All Levels Yoga
All Levels Yoga
5:30-6:15pm
Sound Bath
6:30-8pm
All Levels Yoga
6:30-8pm
Yoga Therapeutics/
Yoga Nidra
10-11:30am
All Levels Amrit
Yoga
5:30-7:30pm (1st
and 3rd Fridays)
The Practice
1/31: 9-10:15am
All Levels Yoga
explorebigsky.com
Explore Big Sky
OUTDOORS
Jan. 23 - Feb. 5, 2015 39
Smash Life! tears up Big Sky Resort
A competitor races past spectators on his way towards the finish line during the fourth annual A-Rob’s Smash Life! Banked Slalom, which took place Jan. 10-11.
Friends of late snowboarder Aaron Robinson founded the annual event to spread his love of snowboarding and good vibes. Smash Life! is a fundraiser for A-Rob’s
Plant A Seed Project, which helps the youth of Montana’s Flathead Valley get a snowboard under their feet. Big Sky was the first stop on this year’s tour, and the
event drew 126 competitors. PHOTOS BY WES OVERVOLD
Mitch Casey is all smiles between linking turns.
Skiers and snowboarders alike cheered as racers flew by in Freemont’s Forest.
A racer carves along one of the course’s many berms.
BEST OF BIG SKY
40 Jan. 23 - Feb. 5, 2015
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$4.4M / 4.6 acres
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explorebigsky.com
THE EDDY LINE
Explore Big Sky
Jan. 23 - Feb. 5, 2015 41
Nymphing: fly fishing’s misunderstood art
BY PATRICK STRAUB
EXPLORE BIG SKY FISHING COLUMNIST
This might sound like the beginning to Norman Maclean’s treatise in “A River
Runs Through It and Other Stories,” but in my family there was no clear line
between work and outdoor recreation. I grew up in the foothills south of
Bozeman where I fished with my brothers and watched my parents help others
enjoy the outdoors – my mom as a career ski instructor and my father as a camp
manger in Paradise Valley. Summers were spent bloodying shins on the rocks
of small creeks and winters picking lines off Bridger Bowl’s ridge.
Fish fluorocarbon leaders and tippets. For more than 20 years now,
fluorocarbon has been responsible for landing a lot more fish because its
chemical structure makes it sink. With this material you can also fish a heavier
breaking-strength line than with conventional monofilament. For example,
you can fish a 4X fluorocarbon instead of 3X monofilament and have similar
strength yet thinner diameter, which helps attain a better drift. Also, some
argue that fluorocarbon is invisible under the surface. I’m not totally sold on
this, but I can say from experience that when fishing subsurface, fluorocarbon
out-fishes conventional mono.
Weight and good things will come. Having some
weight – split shot or moldable putty for example – on your
leader will help sink the flies to the proper depth. I don’t like
to use weight if I don’t have to, but in my kit bag I have three
assortments of various sizes of split shot. It’s annoying as heck,
but it helps me consistently catch fish whether I’m nymphing
out of my boat on the Missouri, sight fishing on DePuy’s spring
creek, or in a deep run south of Big Sky. I start with as little
weight as possible, but if I’m not catching fish it’s often time
to add weight. Conversely, if I know I’m in the fish but not
catching them, I might take off weight or change flies. Use nontoxic split shot whenever possible and when required by local
angling regulations.
Fishing nymphs requires adjusting your focus – using weighted flies, fluorocarbon leaders and
tippets, and learning a few new tactics. This Gallatin River rainbow trout fell for a dead-drifted
beadhead firebead. PHOTOS COURTESY OF GALLATIN RIVER GUIDES
I learned to fish dry flies at a young age and when the fish would not eat a
Coachman Trude or a Royal Wulff, I would occasionally throw a woolly
bugger. It wasn’t until college when I finally understood and appreciated
the subtleties of fishing flies sub-surface. This progression is not unique to
my angling background, as many of us started with single dry flies and have
progressed to long leaders with strike indicators, split-shot, and two-weighted
flies on fluorocarbon tippets.
Why did things get so complicated? Because we like to catch fish,
that’s why. It took me a while to successfully fish nymphs. Few things in
angling top watching a fish eat your dry fly on the
surface, but the more you can successfully fish flies
under the surface, the more fish you’ll catch. Here’s
some help that I never had.
Use a strike indicator. If the weighted flies and split shot
aren’t enough to bungle-up your cast, then add a strike indicator to make things even more interesting. Joking aside, a strike
indicator is essential to catch more fish (Fish can be caught without the use of a strike indicator, just as you can ski off the Lone
Peak Tram with a pair of 220 cm skis). I like to adjust the size
of the indicator to match the size of the water I’m fishing. On a
spring creek I will use a tuft of yarn or a very small foam pinchon. On the Gallatin River I often use a medium-sized plastic
bubble. Generally speaking, your indicator should be placed at
a distance from your flies approximately twice the depth of the
water you’re fishing, but be prepared to change depth often.
I like to place my indicator as close to my flies as possible and
adjust it to fish deeper if I’m not getting any takes.
Fishing deep requires imagination. To be a good nympher you must
grasp the technical parts – proper leader weight, leader material, and detecting strikes are the biggies. Success in nymph fishing truly comes with getting
out there and doing it. Despite what our fathers and grandfathers might have
thought, sometimes it’s OK to cut off the single dry fly and bring out the heavy
artillery.
Pat Straub is the author of six books, including “The Frugal Fly Fisher,” “Montana On The Fly,” and “Everything You Always Wanted to Know About Fly
Fishing.” He and his wife own Gallatin River Guides in Big Sky and along with a
partner owns a guide service on the Missouri River.
Look at the big picture. Fishing nymphs
requires an in-depth – pun-intended – look into the
angling scene. When fishing dry flies you’re often
focused only on the surface. Nymphing adds the
elements of current speed, underwater structure
and depth to the equation. You must determine the
proper amount of weight on your leader, fly size,
getting a proper drift, detecting the strike, and
setting the hook. Not easy things to accomplish all
at once, but by observing and imagining what is
happening under the water’s surface, you’ll be in
the right mindset.
Rock bottom. Nymphing is the down-and-dirty
way to catch fish. Most fish spend the bulk of their
life near the bottom of the river and a nymph floating by is easy to eat. Fish on the bottom also exert a
lot less energy than fish near the surface, so if you
can get your fly down to them you’re going to catch
more.
This fish went after a Pat’s Rubberlegs dead-drifted five feet beneath the surface of the Gallatin.
42 Jan. 23 - Feb. 5, 2015
OUTDOORS
explorebigsky.com
Explore Big Sky
Ski tips from Dan Egan
Solid skiing on rocky slopes
BY DAN EGAN
EXPLORE BIG SKY CONTRIBUTOR
In big mountain skiing you often have to get through bad snow to find the
good snow. Here in Big Sky, there are often rocks above or near the surface of
the snow waiting to trip up skiers and snowboarders. This calls for a strategy
and using specific tactics to ski the slopes. Here are a few ways I break down a
run when it appears rocky.
The entrance. If the entrance is not perfect, simply side step down until
you can make turns. Make sure to have a good solid stance on your side step
with your shoulders square to the hill, and don’t be afraid to use your poles
for balance and as braces. Move quickly down the slope because taking too
long with a difficult entrance can throw off your mental game for skiing
the slope below.
Have a plan. I like to ski rocky areas in sections. I move from snow pod to
snow pod with a clear vision in my mind of where I’m going to stop and start.
This allows me to link a few turns together with confidence before I stop again.
When skiing a rocky slope, sometimes the best route is going straight
down the fall line. PHOTO BY JOHN ARNOLD/MINDFULMOUNTAINS.COM
Speed. Once you have a plan and are through the entrance, move at a
steady pace with a focus on two to three turns at a time. You don’t want
to move too slowly through the rocks, as a bit of speed will help you
avoid obstacles, but don’t move at a reckless pace.
Power slide. If you can power slide past the obstacles, do it. Execute
a good power slide with your feet shoulder width apart, hands and
poles facing down the mountain and with your eyes looking down, not
across the slope.
Keep your eyes looking down the fall line and concentrate on the snow, not the
rocks. PHOTO BY JOHN ARNOLD/MINDFULMOUNTAINS.COM
Turning. When skiing though rocky areas, keep your skis in the fall
line. If you’re going to nick rocks it’s better to be in a skiing position
than with your skis sideways. I like to use hop turns in these situations.
Finding the way. Your eyes are key to navigating through a
minefield of rocks. Remember: you go where you look, so look where
you want to go. Keep your eyes focused down the fall line, concentrate
on the snow and try not to look at the rocks.
Repetition. Skiing the same runs several times has many advantages.
The first time you ski a run, you learn where the rocks are and what
path to take. The second time you can gain a bit of confidence, and
by the third of fourth time you can start to really ski the slope. More
importantly, going back to the same run the next day or later in the
week you can see how the slope has been changed by skier traffic
as well as new snow and wind. This will give you more and more
confidence throughout the season.
Extreme skiing pioneer Dan Egan has appeared in 12 Warren Miller Ski
films and countless others. Today he teaches clinics and guides trips at
locations around the world including Big Sky, where he’ll be teaching Feb.
26-28, March 5-7 and March 12-14. Find more ski tips from Dan Egan
at skiclinics.com/education/skitips.
Move quickly through a steep entrance – like this one in Val d’Isére, France – and
sidestep down it, if necessary. PHOTO BY DAN EGAN
explorebigsky.com
Explore Big Sky
OUTDOORS
Jan. 23 - Feb. 5, 2015 43
PHOTO COURTESY OF BIG SKY RESORT
Olympian Martin Bell teaches free-ski clinic at Big Sky Resort
Former British Olympian Martin Bell will teach a free-ski clinic Feb. 2-3 at Big Sky Resort. Participants must be able to ski difficult blue and expert black diamond runs,
and the two-day clinic will focus on improving skiing skills to tackle the entire mountain with confidence.
Bell competed in four Winter Olympics from 1984 to 1994 and five World Championships from 1985 to 1993. He holds the best result for a male skier in British Olympic
history, placing eighth in the downhill at the 1988 Calgary Games.
“[Big Sky Resort is] a large, rugged mountain with any type of terrain imaginable,” Bell said.
Visit bigskyresort.com/clinics for registration information.
bigskytowncenter.com
bigskytowncenter.com
GET BACK OUT THERE
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44 Jan. 23 - Feb. 5, 2015
WORD FROM THE RESORTS
explorebigsky.com
Explore Big Sky
Giving you the news directly from the region's top ski resorts
BY SHEILA CHAPMAN
On Jan. 31, Bridger Bowl’s grueling
mountaineering event, the Skin to Win
Randonee Rally, returns to the ski area’s
slopes. Competitors will circumnavigate
Bridger’s ridge terrain with rec division
racers gaining 2,000 vertical feet and
the pros ascending 5,000 vertical feet, as
they traverse the ridge from boundary to
boundary.
BIG SKY RESORT PR MANAGER
With above average snowfall, Big Sky
Resort’s groomers, glades and steeps are
waiting for you, and fun abounds when
you’re off the slopes too.
Limber up before hitting the slopes
Monday through Saturday at the resort’s
wellness center, which offers yoga,
kettlebells, pilates, and cardio conditioning
classes. For a schedule of classes, visit
bigskyresort.com/wellness.
Walls of snow, a dazzling array of lights and lasers, bartenders in parkas, and one
raging DJ are all a part of Big Sky Resort’s famous Snobar on Saturday, Jan. 24.
The 21-and-over venue is located next to Swifty 2.0, above the Swift Current
chairlift near the Mountain Village. The après ski fun goes from 5-9 p.m.
Super Bowl Sunday is Feb. 1, and the broadcast will be playing on the big screen
at Whiskey Jack’s starting at 3:30 p.m. Enjoy amazing nachos and plenty of beer,
with cheers and jeers depending on which team you’re rooting for!
The following week, bluegrass music slides into Big Sky Resort for the 9th
annual Big Sky Big Grass Festival, with Leftover Salmon kicking off the festival
Thursday, Feb. 5 at Whiskey Jack’s. Various bands will continue to play at
venues around the resort through Sunday night. Visit bigskyresort.com/
biggrass for the artist lineup, full schedule and ticketing details.
As always, Big Sky Resort offers free après ski music Monday through Saturday
at Whiskey Jack’s, Carabiner Lounge, and Chet’s Bar & Grill.
Cash prizes will be awarded to the male
and female pro division winners, with
medals given to the top three male and
female finishers in both divisions. The awards ceremony will be held at
2 p.m. in the Jim Bridger Lodge, followed by free music by Milton Menasco.
The Skin to Win begins at 8:30 a.m. and racers must be ages 16 and older to
participate. Pre-registration is required by 4 p.m. on Jan. 28 and a mandatory
pre-race meeting will be held at the Beall Park Recreation Center in Bozeman
on Jan. 30 at 5:30 p.m.
With a 54-inch base as of EBS press time on Jan. 21, the steep chutes and
couloirs on Bridger’s ridge terrain are filling in and new lines are opening up
every time there’s a fresh dump of snow. Get up there on a powder day and
you might find yourself on the Bridger Bowl Daily Video, featured every
afternoon on the ski area’s website. – T.A.
BY PAUL ROBERTSON
LONE MOUNTAIN RANCH GENERAL MANAGER
BY KATIE SMITH
LONE PEAK PR
We’re enjoying this crazy winter
weather here at Bohart Ranch,
whether it’s skiing new snow
or enjoying sunny, spring-like
days. We invite you to come up
Bridger Canyon and enjoy our
groomed trails and great snow. Lessons are offered daily for skate and classic
skiing and we’ve just begun our first series of clinics for the season.
Sunday, Jan. 25 is the first biathlon race at Bohart in many years, and we can’t
wait to bring this fun sport back. Those that want to see what biathlon is all
about can participate in the Try It Biathlon clinic after the race. Visit bridgerbiathlonclub.org for more information.
UPCOMING EVENTS:
Sunday, Jan. 25: Bridger Biathlon Club Race
Bohart will host biathletes from around the state. Categories are offered for
most ages and abilities. Beginners are provided biathlon rifles and must complete an introduction and safety clinic.
Sunday, Feb. 8: Bohart Bonus Day
Ski Bohart at reduced prices. Discounted trail fees and ski rentals will be
extended to adults and children, with kids ages 6 and under skiing free. There
will also be a drawing for a free 2015 season pass. Warm up at the trail shelter,
or bring a picnic lunch for a fun day with family and friends.
Lone Mountain Ranch has had an exciting start to the New Year. Nordic ski
conditions are great with 75 km of trails open. There are also 30 km of snowshoe trails open to the public, which is a fun, alternative way to explore the
ranch property along with the adjacent wilderness area. Due to unseasonably warm temperatures, the fishing is superb for this time
of year, both on the Gallatin and Madison rivers. The ranch has a knowledgeable team of fly-fishing guides, so why not take a break from skiing for
your chance to land a trophy trout? Lately, nymph fishing has been the most
consistent way to put fish in the net on the Gallatin. Over on the Madison
you can find some pods of rising fish when the midges are hatching and when
the wind isn’t blowing too hard. Call the ranch’s outdoor shop to schedule a
guided day of fishing. After spending a day on our trails, or downhill skiing at Big Sky Resort, visit
the saloon for drinks and après snacks. We have a craft cocktail and beer list,
and a variety of wines by the glass. The fireplace will be roaring alongside
live music Monday – Saturday, which starts at 6 p.m. on Mondays and
4:30 p.m. the rest of the week. Chef Nick Steen has created a saloon menu
offering local fare and hearty snacks to help you refuel after an active day
outdoors. The dining room is also open to the public for breakfast, lunch and dinner
– call (406) 995-2783 to book your reservation. And, if you haven’t had a
chance to explore our sleigh ride dinner, it’s a must – it’s the original Big Sky
sleigh ride.
Whether you visit the ranch for the trails, the unique dinner sleigh ride, the
experienced fishing guides, or the food and drinks, winter at Lone Mountain
Ranch is a magical place. This year LMR celebrates its centennial anniversary,
so stay tuned for an announcement about special events and festivities for the
Big Sky community and those who love to visit.
ENTERTAINMENT
Jan. 23 - Feb. 5, 2015 45
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46 Jan. 23 - Feb. 5, 2015
GEAR REVIEW
explorebigsky.com
Explore Big Sky
Oakley Prizm A-Frame 2.0
The A-Frame 2.0 answers the question goggle manufacturers have been asking
for years: How do we make a comfortable goggle with universal qualities? By
keeping the same triple-layer foam and dual vents the A-Frame has always offered, Oakley changed the game in two major ways with the 2.0: a broader field
of vision and the revolutionary Prizm lens.
By giving riders wider peripheral vision, the A-Frame 2.0 reduces the chances
of being broadsided by that snowboarder railing a heelside turn, the skier who’s
French frying when they should be pizza pie-ing, or that pesky fir that can sideswipe you in tight trees.
Oakley’s Prizm lens is a product built on decades of research, and by adjusting to
varying light conditions, you can keep riding rather than changing your lens out
with every passing cloud. Add an anti-fog coating and 100 percent UV protection, and you have an unstoppable lens.
The weather in Montana can shift quickly from bluebird to gray and cloudy. Pack
the A-Frame 2.0, and you’ll have the only goggle you need to get by. – J.T.O.
Frame: Jet black; Lens: Prizm B-32. $130
explorebigsky.com
Explore Big Sky
FUN
Jan. 23 - Feb. 5, 2015 47
big sky beats
BY MARIA WYLLIE
EXPLORE BIG SKY ASSOCIATE EDITOR
Find out what tunes we’re bumping! In “Big Sky Beats,” Explore Big Sky staff and guests
talk soundtracks for winter in the Rockies, and guests have a chance to share what they listen
to when they shred.
Mitch Hamel, a local firefighter and friend of mine, recently asked why I never feature
country music in this column. I didn’t have a good answer, so I felt it was about time to
make a playlist in Hamel’s honor. You won’t see many country classics on here though.
Rather, these songs fall within the pop-country genre and all have fun lyrics and melodies to sing along with.
om
k.c Tim McGraw were some of my favorite councand
The Dixie Chicks, Shania Twain, Jewel
Sto
n
e
Op There was just something so satisfying about singing
try artists when I was in my tweens.
tor
Vec A Woman!” as a 12-year-old girl.
.Like
w
Shania Twain’s “Man! I Feel
ww
They aren’t my go-to songs anymore, but I’ve listed a few of my favorite blast-from-thepast country tracks, as well as some newer songs by popular country artists like Jason
Aldean, who’s coming to Bozeman this spring, and Dierks Bentley who recently inspired
me to enjoy some cocktails on a plane. Whether you’re a country fan or not, you’ll have
no problem getting into some of these songs.
1. “Drunk on a Plane,” Dierks Bentley
2. “That Don’t Impress Me Much,” Shania Twain
3. “American Kids,” Kenny Chesney
4. “She’s Country,” Jason Aldean
5. “Drunk on You,” Luke Bryan
6. “Need You Now,” Lady Antebellum
7. “Gunpowder & Lead,” Miranda Lambert
8. “Something Like That,” Tim McGraw
9. “Before He Cheats,” Carrie Underwood
10. “I Hope You Dance,” Lee Ann Womack
11. “She’s in Love With the Boy,” Trisha Yearwood
12. “These Are My People,” Rodney Atkins
13. “Six-Pack Summer,” Phil Vassar
14. “Chicken Fried,” Zac Brown Band
15. “Neon Light,” Blake Shelton
American Life in Poetry:
Column 513
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BY TED KOOSER, U.S. POET LAUREATE
Kwame Dawes is the editor of Prairie Schooner publication and one of my
colleagues at the University of Nebraska. Had I never had the privilege of getting to
know him I still would have loved the following poem, for its clear and matter-offact account of a sudden loss.
Coffee Break
By Kwame Dawes
It was Christmastime,
the balloons needed blowing,
and so in the evening
we sat together to blow
balloons and tell jokes,
and the cool air off the hills
made me think of coffee,
so I said, “Coffee would be nice,”
and he said, “Yes, coffee
would be nice,” and smiled
as his thin fingers pulled
the balloons from the plastic bags;
so I went for coffee,
and it takes a few minutes
to make the coffee
and I did not know
if he wanted cow’s milk
or condensed milk,
and when I came out
to ask him, he was gone,
just like that, in the time
it took me to think,
cow’s milk or condensed;
the balloons sat lightly
on his still lap.
American Life in Poetry is made possible by The Poetry Foundation (poetryfoundation.org),
publisher of Poetry magazine. It is also supported by the Department of English at the University
of Nebraska-Lincoln. Poem copyright ©2013 by Kwame Dawes, “Coffee Break,” from “Duppy
Conqueror: New and Selected Poems,” (Copper Canyon Press, 2013). Poem reprinted by permission of Kwame Dawes and the publisher. Introduction copyright © 2015 by The Poetry Foundation. The introduction's author, Ted Kooser, served as United States Poet Laureate Consultant in
Poetry to the Library of Congress from 2004-2006. We do not accept unsolicited manuscripts.
FAST. FRESH.
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48 Jan. 23 - Feb. 5, 2015
BACK 40
explorebigsky.com
Explore Big Sky
For Explore Big Sky, the Back 40 is a resource: a place where we can
delve into subjects and ask experts to share their knowledge. Topics
include regional history, profiles of local artists and musicians, snow and
avalanche education, how-to pieces for traditional or outdoor skills, and
science.
Noun: wild or rough terrain adjacent to a developed area Origin: shortened form of “back 40 acres”
‘The Last Glacier’: An artistic collaboration
BY NANCY MAHONEY
EXPLORE BIG SKY CONTRIBUTOR
“The Last Glacier” project is a collaboration of
three artists seeking to capture the fading majesty
of the remaining glaciers in Glacier National Park.
At the time of its founding in 1910, the park
contained 150 glaciers; today only 25 remain, and
the U.S. Geological Society predicts that these will
be gone by 2045.
Before the park’s name becomes a tragic irony,
Todd Anderson, Bruce Crownover and Ian van
Coller decided to spend three summers hiking into
15 of the park’s glaciers to create artworks that
challenge conventional representations of glaciers
as sublime and stoic landscapes. The three artists
have produced reductive woodblock prints and
large-format photographs that convey complex
stratigraphy within the ice masses, as well as a
sense of perpetual motion.
Though the works are aesthetically beautiful, “The
Last Glacier” series invokes a contemplation of
wonder and loss in the face of seemingly powerful
and pristine landscapes, ones that have revealed
themselves as inherently fragile and more subject
to human impact than we had imagined.
Ian van Coller, the photographer in this
collaboration, has contemplated why glaciers are so
notoriously difficult to photograph. “They possess
immense size and depth, yet have a deceivingly
subtle and monochromatic surface architecture,”
wrote van Coller in his research, adding that this
makes them an artistically formidable technical
and intellectual challenge.
With the help of his collaborators, van Coller
carries 50 pounds of gear 20-plus miles into the
backcountry to get close to the retreating masses
of ice, ultimately creating panoramic photographic
prints that capture more detail than the human
eye can absorb. Unlike landscape portraits by
“Jackson Glacier,” 2013. PHOTO BY IAN VAN COLLER
Ansel Adams and Galen Rowell, which are meant
purely as poetic contemplations of nature and the
sublime, van Coller’s work physically connects the
viewer with the terrain. His work is minimalist,
often eliminating the horizon and sky so that
we have to engage with the piece to decipher the
depth and scale of the landscape.
Printmakers Todd Anderson and Bruce Crownover
use woodblock techniques to make original
lithographs inspired by the glaciers in the park.
They created layered landscapes that go beyond
realistic presentations. Their prints portray a larger
truth about the glacial texture, mass, and subtle
colorations, as well as their antiquity, than can be
captured in scientific prose.
Anderson and Crownover reconstruct what they
witness first hand from memory and imagination.
Their original
imagery for the
project is loosely
sketched and
colored in the
field, and then
painstakingly
transferred and
carved out of
woodblocks.
“Blackfoot Glacier,” 2014, reductive jigsaw woodcut, six runs and eight colors,
20” x 30,” WOODCUT BY TODD ANDERSON
“Woodblock
prints are like
jigsaw puzzles,”
says Anderson,
whose prints
typically require
two days of
carving, then
up to two weeks
of inking and
printing the
various layers
of colors in
multiple runs.
The glaciers themselves are evoked in the
reductive nature of the medium, as well as the
slow and repetitive woodcut process itself, which
–like retreating glaciers – are carved and recarved,
resulting in a block that cannot be printed again.
The final prints portray subtle shifts in line and
color that convey texture and accentuate light,
allowing us to contemplate details we might
otherwise miss.
This collection of work will come together in a
large-scale, limited edition artist book. With the
help of master book binder Rory Sparks, the three
artists will make 15 editions that are 24 inches by
37 inches when open, the monumental scale of the
book referencing the monumental scale of Glacier
National Park’s landscape.
The work in “The Last Glacier” project challenges
our perceptions that glaciers are remote and
irrelevant, or merely obscure curiosities as the
last remnants of a distant ice age. But rather than
creating art that serves as scientific documentation
or political bludgeon, Anderson, Crownover and
van Coller effectively translate our understandings
of the impacts of global climate change into a
comprehensible, human scale.
Many of us in Montana have made the magnificent
hike to Grinnell Glacier and felt awed by its
beauty, but most of us will not make the trek to
the more distant glaciers. With this work, we can
contemplate their waning grandeur, and why it is
that we should care about them.
Nancy M. Mahoney is an adjunct professor of
anthropology at Montana State University and
a doctoral student in American studies. She is a
contributing writer and researcher for the “Last
Glacier Project,” as well as other collaborative
projects involving climate change and geographical
remoteness.