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WINTER
insidepamagazine.com
2014
Camouflage
Your Christmas
The House That
Jacob Built
Scranton, PA or
Brooklyn, NY?
+
two
shops
one
determined
Confessions of a
Sometimes Santa
INSIDE: Professional Tips for Holiday Side Dishes!
owner
WINTER 2014
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I still want to
tee it up.
A new knee, hip, or shoulder can get you
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Inside Pennsylvania | November 2014
Winter 2014
Have you been good this past year?
It’s probably a question you haven’t been asked since
you were a child sitting on the lap of a jolly, fat old man
with a white beard.
Being “good” for a mere 24 hours can be tough for any
little one. To keep goodness going all year long is truly a
tall order.
Without question, it’s a lot easier to be the one asking
the “good” question rather than having to be the one
answering it.
Ever play Santa? To don the red suit, pad the belly,
bellow hearty ho-ho-ho’s and see the twinkle in the
eyes of child believers is a real treat. John Moore of
Northumberland has played the role many times and
in this issue, he shares some of his most precious
memories. If you have the opportunity this year, go for it.
May the joy you receive equal the joy you give.
0VU
JOTJEF
• • • • •
During this season of celebration and doing for
others, there’s also a lot of feasting going on. There’s
Thanksgiving, Hanukkah, Christmas and Kwanza and just
when you think you can’t — and shouldn’t — eat another
bite, along comes New Year’s. But there’s a very special
feast that folks around Richfield look forward to all year
long. It’s the annual Buck Hunters Dinner, held the third
Saturday in January in Mount Pleasant Mills.
Hosted by the local Lions Club, the dinner pays tribute
to the area’s buck hunters, whether they have been
successful or not, and it’s been going on for about 60
years.
Originally only men attended but now anyone of any
age is welcome. If you had luck hunting in Pennsylvania,
by all means bring your rack of antlers along because
the highlight of the event is a contest where those
antlers will be measured and scored. The top three
receive cash prizes. Every hunter has a chance — one of
the categories is for the smallest or oddest rack.
For many, this dinner is a family tradition. The stories
shared at the table alone are reason enough for
attending.
Venison, by the way, is not on the menu.
Read all about it, inside.
• • • • •
Between now and 2015, give thanks for the gift of
food on the table, having another year under your belt
and that your belt really isn’t Santa-sized. And if it is, work
on that as soon as the feasting is over.
Above all, be good, people.
Volume 8, Issue 4
Gary Grossman, publisher
Joanne Arbogast, editor
Bryce Kile, design editor
Patricia A. Bennett, director of advertising
Elizabeth Knauer, advertising sales manager
staff writers/contributors:
Cindy O. Herman, John L. Moore, Harold Raker,
Dru Aumiller, Jerri Brouse, Tricia Kline,
Karen Lynn Zeedick, Evamarie Socha,
Tabitha Goodling
staff photographers:
Robert Inglis, Justin Engle, Amanda August
Larry Schaeffer, information technology
Fred Scheller, circulation director
Leonard Machesic, controller
INSIDE PENNSYLVANIA:
Office (570) 988-5364, FAX (570) 988-5348
(Advertising), (570) 286-7695 (Editorial)
ADVERTISING SALES: (800) 792-2303 Ext. 208
SUBSCRIPTIONS: (800) 792-2303 Ext. 483
E-MAIL: [email protected]
or write to Inside Pennsylvania magazine,
200 Market St., Sunbury, PA 17801
On T he Cov er:
Connie Harter, owner of Retrah and The Gingerbread
House in Lewisburg, Pa., with her children, Chelsea
and Bradley. Photo by Robert Inglis.
INSIDE PENNSYLVANIA (ISSN 1935-4738) is published
quarterly at 200 Market St., Sunbury, PA 17801.
Inside Pennsylvania magazine is not responsible for unsolicited submissions.
Reproduction or use of editorial or graphic content in any manner, without
permission, is prohibited. Copyright 2014 by Community News Group LLC.
All rights reserved. Single issue: $3.95. Subscription: $10 annually (U.S. only).
POSTMASTER: Send address change to Inside Pennsylvania magazine, 200
Market St., Sunbury, PA 17801. Advertising rates and specifications available
online at InsidePaMagazine.com. Inside Pennsylvania was founded March 2007. A
publication of The Daily Item, a member of Community News Group LLC.
Editor
www.insidepamagazine.com
Inside Pennsylvania | November 2014
3
,
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e
P
e
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I
Dear
inbox
Late November 2013 on
the Wynding Brook Golf
Course in Milton.
Share w it h us!
Vikki Peterson
Letters to Inside Pennsylvania are always welcome. We also
like photos from around the Valley, like the one shown above.
Photos must be submitted via email untouched (right from the
camera) at 300 dpi minimum and 7 megabytes or less in size.
Send them to us at 200 Market St., Sunbury, PA 17801 or
email to [email protected]
Dear IPA,
Dear Inside Pennsylvania:
I grew up in Dalmatia (Northumberland County) and left home
at 19 years of age. I was drafted and then remained in the
service until I retired. I now live in Globe, Ariz., and miss the
Pennsylvania Dutch way of life.
I visit home every couple of years. My sister sends me Cindy O.
Herman’s writing from Inside Pennsylvania magazine, and I just
wanted to let you know that it makes me feel good every time I
read her work.
By the way, Lebanon bologna is available here, but I have to go
to a specialty store to find it so guess that makes the bologna
special. They used to have a butcher shop in town that would
make me ring bologna, but that is long gone now and I miss it
greatly.
Keep up the good work!
— Fred Klinger,
Globe, AZ
This is a delayed thank you for Cindy O. Herman’s work in
researching and writing the wonderfully informative article
about Thomas Edison and the former St. Edward’s Church in
Shamokin (“First church in the world to ‘turn on the lights,’”
Spring 2014). We have accessioned the magazine into our
collection and placed it in our climate-controlled archives vault,
where it will be preserved as part of our diocesan history.
Again, much thanks. Keep up the good work! Take care and
God bless.
Sincerely,
— Linda V. Itzoe, Ph.D.
Assistant Chancellor for Archives and Diocesan Archivist
Diocese of Harrisburg
4800 Union Deposit Road
Harrisburg, PA 17111-3710
We read with interest the article on Strong Pools & Spas (“Going
Strong,” Fall 2014) because we love our hot tub but we don’t
love our hot tub cover. Over the years, it has become very heavy
— it seems to absorb water from both the steam and bubbling
water underneath as well as rain and melting snow on top. The
article says Strong has developed a new hardcover system
that can “hold up to the harsh conditions of the hot tub and its
surrounding environment” and “should last the life of the hot
tub.” Kudos to Strong for realizing the importance of the hot tub
cover. It’s now on the top of our Christmas wish list!
— The Wilsons
Mifflinburg, PA
| by Rick Dandes
COV ER STOR Y
Going
Strong
Williamsport, Strong
trong Pools & Spas’
nt
Spicer scale plastics manufacturing equipme
president Wade
from making its
da
and branched out
become
has demonstrate
ry pet products to
creating proprieta manufacturer to OEMs in
remarkable gift for
a contract
built bumpers,
l
Strong
s.
ationa
industrie
intern
various
a thriving
tanks for the
when
wheel wells and water
displays for the
business at a time
motor-home industry,
my is
industries, plastic
the world’s econo
shower, bath and golf
a
ve industry, and
still recovering from
parts for the automoti
tanks for the
high-pressure hydraulic to name just
recession.
in college
manufactured
Many OEMs that Strong went out
back or
products for scaled
During that time,
of business entirely.
fall and its ability to
Strong saw its sales
ing debt diminish.
collect its outstand
decided he
It was then that Spicer
proprietary
needed to create more
’s
control the company
products to better
the creation of the
dorm room
future. This lead to
national defense industry,
From its start in a
of the world’s
only employee — to
Colosseum Pool, one
a few.
— with Spicer as the
a growing
swimming pools.
distribution
with
ound
’90s,
sales,
late
onal
above-gr
the
In
best
a large, multinati
product was its
for additional space,
manufacturing
The downside to this
company and a need
ent
and consumer goods
company
developm
s,
the
to
current
led
its operation
seasonality, which
Spicer purchased the
company, that, through
plus squarehot tub product line
base — could be
of the less-seasonal
headquarters, a 140,000- occupy in
partnerships and dealer maintaining
and
in 2004.
foot facility they presently
credited with creating
was ramping up
jobs.
In 2006, just as Strong
Northumberland.
many thousands of
it faced many
the recession
in 1992 in his last
and spa production,
As the company evolved,
pool
burst,
attacks
Spicer started Strong
bubble
had
the terrorist
University. Spicer
began. When the housing with many
challenges, including
semester at Alfred
along
ting energy costs,
school newspaper
the hot tub industry,
of 9/11 and skyrocke
read an article in the
for everyone.
North America,
r program to help
other industries in
which changed things
about an incubato
Over the next
in the glass industry.
suffered a serious blow.
launch businesses
hot tubs went from
accepted to law
four years sales of
He had already been
sold per year to
to start a business
a peak of 580,000 units
school, but decided
by the end
on
year
courses
per
few
sold
a
in
180,000 units
instead, and enrolled
g pool industry
Strong was inspired
of 2012. The swimmin
fiberglass. The name
dismal path.
fiberglass.
followed the same
by the strength of
many hot
of years, he had the
During this time period, turers
For the first couple
ol manufac
school friends when
tub/swimming-po
help of some high
operations
their
products
s original
drastically scaled back
needed. The business’
entirely. Strong
were produced
or went out of business
were pet-related and
of Strong
turing process.
Pools & Spas, a division from under
using a fiberglass manufac time ago,
to go
was a long
Industries, managed
“Even though that
to nearly 10,000
some of those
1,000 hot tubs in 2004
we still manufacture
time period the
Spicer said.
hot tubs over the same
original products,”
two-thirds. “It was
officially
industry was cut by
The company, which
” Spicer said.
has gone through
pretty remarkable,
incorporated in 1995,
company was
years after he
In 2008, just as the
many changes. A few
, Spicer moved
company
the
started
s from Sayre to
Strong’s operation
We’ve survived
through all this,
we’ve grown,
and we continue
to develop new
products and new
product lines. It
hasn’t been easy.
8
4
Inside Pennsylvania | November 2014
with its move to
Williamsport. Coupled
purchased large-
S
ROB INGLIS
To Inside PA:
Inside Pennsylva
nia | August 2014
within the
strengthening its position unthinkable
the
pool and spa industry,
plant fire. Spicer
happened … a major
morning” and
said, “It was a Monday
call he received
he can recall the phone
. During first-shift
like it was yesterday
smoking in a
operations, an employee
area accidentally
nondesignated smoking
dumpster on
lit a cardboard recycling the wind that
have it,
fire. As luck would
to west, instead of
day was blowing east
. The wind
direction
east
its usual west to
cardboard onto the
deposited burning
resulted in a near
rubber roof, which
catastrophic fire.
all this, we’ve
“We’ve survived through develop new
to
grown, and we continue lines. It hasn’t
product
products and new
said.
been easy,” Spicer
of people who
Strong employs a lot
of the company.
depend on the success country has
the
Spicer does not think
yet.
recession
the
of
out
come
own, but that is
“We’re holding our
footprint and
partly due to our global
product throughout
our ability to sell our
” The company
much of the world.
U.K.,
Norway,
Sweden,
boasts sales in
to name several.
Netherlands and France, long-term
d
Strong has also develope
many well-known
partnerships with
Home Depot,
retailers, such as Costco, Wholesale,
BJ’s
Sam’s Club, Amazon,
g Pool Supplies
Sears, Leslies Swimmin
has become very
and others. Strong
ability to ship large
well known for its
turing facilities
products from its manufac to the end
directly
and/or warehouses
ship an 8-by-8
can
“We
r.
consume
hot tub and have it
foot, 1,000-pound
most anywhere in
delivered and installed
one to two weeks,”
North America within
said Spicer.
of developing
Strong is in the process its North
ip with
a unique partnersh
that will allow
American dealers
in how they
consumers more choices North
product.
purchase a Strong
rs will have the
American consume
g Strong’s products
option of purchasin
“big-box” store,
through their favorite
er websites
-consum
Strong’s direct-to
buyhottubsdirect.
(strongspas.com and
ed, Strong
com) or through time-test nd-mortar”
(“brick-a
Authorized Dealers
stores).
www.insidepamagaz
ine.com
se to purchase a
However they choo d item, they can
Strong-manufacture that Strong takes
ing
rest assured know
and warrantying
mers
custo
its
servicing
seriously.
its products very
Inside Pennsylva
nia | August 2014
9
Vikki Peterson
HOLIDAYS
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Visit our Deli, Seafood or Bakery and learn more
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www.insidepamagazine.com
Inside Pennsylvania | November 2014
5
8
16
inside
what’s
Winter 2014
contents»
23
8
Cover Story: Two Shops,
One Determined Owner
12
From Here To ... Here: Confessions
of a Sometimes Santa
16
Freedom Train Rolls Along
Museum Tracks: Patriotism Feature
Of Annual Holiday Display
23 Feather Trees: No Longer a Lost Art
26 Camouflage Your Christmas
36 Wrestling Up a Good Time
42 The House That Jacob Built
47 Buck Hunters Dinner: For
60 Years, Annual Dinner
Celebrates Deer Hunting
26
6
Inside Pennsylvania | November 2014
42
52
52 Restored Church Building Has Rich
History, Hosts Community Events
62
features»
18
IMPRESS YOUR GUESTS
Chef Paul: Professional Tips
for Holiday Side Dishes
34 Out and About: Red Cross
WWII Hanger Dance
54 Sprecken Sie ...
58 Dates to Remember
62 Pennsylvania Plants:
Quenn Anne’s Lace
See More photos onl ine
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Click on “Other” in the Categories list, then
click “Inside Pennsylvania Magazine”
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Shay Hoffman, Director of Catering
Inside Pennsylvania | November 2014
7
Cov er S tory
Retrah &
The Gingerbread House
two
shops
one
determined
owner
8
Inside Pennsylvania | November 2014
J
Story by
se
erri Brou
y
Photos b
S
g
Robert In
lis
stores.
So, she took the plunge. Initially Harter
kept up with the regular stock items The
Gingerbread House had been known
for — bath products (soaps, sprays and
lotions), small gift items, pottery, prints
and frames.
Things were going along well enough,
says Harter, and she may have remained
content doing what she was doing until
she saw an opportunity to add a men’s
and women’s clothing and accessories
store into the mix.
There was a building for sale down the
street a bit — one that would have enough
room for both stores to be under one
roof and provide an excellent shopping
experience for customers. Harter seized
the opportunity.
“It’s perfect,” Harter says. “We have two
separate storefronts, but inside, one just
flows right into the other.”
On the side boasting The Gingerbread
There are a number of shirts hanging on
House, shoppers can still find old
a rack in one corner, next to a small sofa
wanted to be a part of the downtown. The favorites — gift items mostly, some candy
— where Harter presumably never has
and unique trinkets that might otherwise
downtown is so neat and you don’t see a
the time to sit and rest. Stacked on top of lot of successful downtowns anymore.”
only be found in stores in bigger cities
filing cabinets are boxes filled with other
or online. There are also hand-painted
She had also been hearing people
items for the shop, which were either once talking about the need for better shopping wine glasses, picture frames, the
for sale or will be in the future.
selections — trendy, more modern items
Harter smiles and runs her fingers
that can’t be found in malls and chain
continued on page 10
he had no idea what
she was getting into,
really, when she
decided to purchase a little
store on the main street of
a quaint little town called
Lewisburg. It just sounded
like fun, says Connie Harter,
as she shuffles through a
pile of paperwork on the
desk she uses in the back
room of her stores, Retrah
and The Gingerbread
House. She shuffles a few
things around and leans
back in her chair, surveying
the rest of the contents in
her office.
www.insidepamagazine.com
through her hair as she recalls how she
went from being a newcomer to local
business owner.
“I bought The Gingerbread House
— the business — first, in 2007,” she
says. “They had been in business for 35
years and were well-established. I really
“It’s perfect. We
have two separate
storefronts, but
inside, one just
flows right into
the other.”
Inside Pennsylvania | November 2014
9
aforementioned soaps, sprays and lotions,
inexpensive jewelry, keychains, candles
and other novelties. Also available is the
pottery (crocks, plates, mugs) featuring
local landmarks, the famous Lewisburg
lamppost, a few baby items, holiday decor
and notepads.
Take a slight right and you’ll find
yourself in Retrah (that’s Harter, spelled
backward, in case you were wondering),
where you’re about to experience big-city
shopping in a small-town atmosphere.
Here, the staff knows their stuff and gives
customers the personalized attention that
makes small-town shopping worthwhile.
“We consider ourselves to be like a small
department store,” says Harter. “We carry
a little bit of everything.”
“Everything” includes men’s clothing
from lines including True Grit, Agave,
Southern Tide, Southern Proper, Peter
Millar, Michael Kors, Scott Barber, Robert
Talbott, Vineyard Vines, Smathers and
Branson, and shoes by Alan Edmonds
and Martin Dingman.
The women’s clothing line boasts names
like BCBGGeneration, Free People, Lucky
Brand, Bali, IC Collection, Conrad C,
Mary NY, Dylan, Lynn Richie, Not Your
Daughter’s Jeans, Vineyard Vines, Spanx
and Hanky Panky.
“We have it all,” says Harter with a smile.
“Suits, dresses, jeans and sweaters — and
we have such a variety of clothing that it
works for all ages.”
In keeping with supporting other
local businesses, Harter is also working
with a group of Bucknell students who
started up their own company called
Uscape Apparel, and is offering T-shirts
featuring the Bucknell University campus
landscape.
How did Harter manage to put together
such a unique line of clothing and
accessories and get a handle on running a
business so quickly? Well, she it was trial
and error.
When Harter and her family (husband
Dr. Dean Harter and children Chelsea
10
Inside Pennsylvania | November 2014
and Bradley) first arrived in Lewisburg
from South Carolina, Harter says she
thought running a business would
simply be something to keep her busy —
something that would be different and
fun. Prior to joining the retail world she
had worked as a registered nurse.
She soon learned that being a successful
businesswoman might indeed be fun, but
it wasn’t going to be easy. Still, she learned
early on the key to getting it right wasn’t
so complicated.
“I just asked a lot of questions,” she
jokes. “A lot. I flat out told people I didn’t
know what I was doing and asked for
help. It was a lot of trial and error early
on.”
Soon, though, Harter got the hang of
things. She started traveling to shows,
researching designers online and figured
We have it all.
out the ordering process.
“Customers will often come in and
ask about a certain line,” she explains.
“I try to bring in what people want. We
have traditional clothing that has a little
flair — stuff you’re not going to find in
every department store, and I try to only
bring in a few pieces of each style so not
everyone in town is necessarily going to
have the same outfit you just bought.”
If that outfit doesn’t fit, by the way, no
problem. Retrah offers tailoring, too.
“That’s something people don’t always
realize,” she says.
Harter is always looking for ways to
promote her stores and get out littleknown facts like the tailoring and that
not-so-secret discount room customers
love (make sure you ask when you stop
in). She uses social media sites like
Facebook, Twitter and Instagram to
advertise new products and seasonal
collections and said simply giving
customers the service they want and
deserve is what has helped her grow
and flourish over the past few years. She
also credits the Lewisburg Downtown
Partnership with helping bring in new
customers.
Basically, though, when it’s all said and
done, Harter says she owes her success to
her customers.
“We have a lot of clientele that comes
in on a regular basis and we get to know
them and what they like, so if something
new comes in we think they will like, one
of us will call and tell them about it,” says
Harter. “Things like that are what set us
apart from chain department stores.”
While success has certainly had its
perks, it can also sometimes leave Harter
feeling overwhelmed.
“In the first year we were in this new
building, we grew 47 percent,” she recalls.
“That really changed the game for me. I
had to hire more people and add store
hours.”
Even so, Harter wouldn’t change a thing,
she says, because she believes that keeping
downtowns like Lewisburg’s viable is
important. “We (local stores) provide jobs
for people and help boost the economy.”
She is glad to see other successful stores
on Market Street and surrounding side
streets because “the downtown won’t
survive with just one or two good stores.”
With that in mind, Harter also knows,
in a world ruled by the Internet, she needs
to tap into the online crowd. Online
shopping will soon be available and she
just launched her new website, Retrah.
com.
“I am always planning,” she says. “It’s not
just about what I can offer (customers)
today — it’s about being proactive about
the next 15 years. I won’t just let things sit
as is.”
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Inside Pennsylvania | November 2014
11
F rom Here to ... here | by John L. Moore
Confessions of a
sometimes Santa
I
’ll never forget the first
time I ever played Santa
Claus. It was December
1972. I was a reporter in
Sunbury for The Daily Item
newspaper, and I did it for a
story.
I borrowed a Santa costume; suited up
in the newsroom, had a colleague adjust
the beard, found my courage and walked
across Market Street to Santa’s house in
Cameron Park.
Eager children and smiling parents
stood waiting by the house. “Here he
comes!” someone shouted.

Are you really
Santa?
I climbed a step or two and sat in Santa’s
slightly elevated chair. The children
started coming up to sit in Santa’s lap and
tell him what they wanted for Christmas.
Some, especially the little ones, came
reluctantly. Others, especially the older
ones, harbored suspicions. “Are you really
Santa?” one boy asked.
A little girl got her tiny fingers in Santa’s
beard and tugged ever so gently.
It was a cool evening, and for two full
hours, one by one, the children came up
to Santa, many with eyes open wide and
brimming with belief.
Most of the girls wanted dolls, and boys
wanted trucks or trains.
Invariably I asked each child: “Have you
obeyed your mommy and your daddy all
year?”
All but one said that they had. When I
put the question to the tot who became
the exception — a pretty little girl with
brown eyes — she blurted out, “I don’t
have a daddy!”
Her mother gave Santa a furious look.





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12
Inside Pennsylvania | November 2014

Late in the session, a man and woman
arrived with three small children who
came up one by one and confided their
Christmas requests. As the third child
got down, the man walked over and said
quietly that the woman was his sister and
that she was mentally challenged. Could
she come up and sit on Santa’s lap?
“Of course,” I said.
Smiling, she settled happily into
Santa’s lap. As we chatted, I realized that
although she was older than I was, she
was as full of belief and excitement as any
of the children who had preceded her.
As she left, she said, “Merry Christmas,
Santa!”
“Merry Christmas,” I replied. I tried to
say it heartily, but I was feeling sad.
Over the years, I’ve learned that to
succeed as a Santa, one needs to have all
the correct elements of a costume and
all the essential accessories. My own
collection includes two sacks for toys,
one green and one red; several pairs of
old-fashioned spectacles; and three pairs
of black boots, two of which have faux fur
lining the tops.
I wasn’t nearly so well equipped when,
a few days before Christmas in 1975, I
performed as Santa for the kindergarten
class attended by our oldest child.
I felt fully confident as I bounded into
the classroom, dressed in a borrowed suit
and carrying a huge sack of presents over
my shoulder.
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“Merry Christmas, children,” I
exclaimed.
“Merry Christmas, Santa,” the children
said.
Suddenly a little boy, who just happened
to be my son, shouted out, “Hey! That’s
my dad!”
As the other children lined up for a
quick chat with Santa, the teacher took
continued on page 15
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my boy aside. “Why do you think that’s
your father?” she asked.
“My dad has shoes like that,” he replied.
Nothing the teacher said could persuade
him otherwise. When it was my son’s turn
to sit on Santa’s lap, he smiled and asked,
“Where’d you get the suit, Dad?”
“Shhh,” I said. “I’m here on special
assignment from the North Pole.”
Santa suit and carried an assortment of
wrapped and beribboned presents to the
neighbors who live next door. Mrs. Claus
had even arranged for Santa’s pack to
contain something for the neighbors’ dog,
a large and energetic German Shepherd.
When Santa arrived, the dog was in
the backyard, but as I pulled the doggy
treat out of the pack, some well-meaning
person opened the back door so the
pooch could come in for his gift.
The dog rushed into the kitchen, but
stopped abruptly when he spotted a
white-bearded man in a bright red suit
and white gloves standing in the next
room. First he barked. Then he charged.
Not to worry. Santa pointed his gloved
index finger right at the dog’s eyes. In
a loud, firm voice, Santa commanded,
“SIT!”
The dog sat. Crisis averted.
After all, nobody misbehaves on
Christmas Eve.
To be sure, he had spotted a flaw. I was
wearing black tie shoes beneath black
spats that rose nearly to my knees. The
next time I played Santa, I purchased a
pair of shiny black boots.
On rare occasions, I have dressed as
Santa Claus and gone to the homes of
friends.
One recent Christmas Eve, I put on my
Editor’s note: Local nonprofit organizations in
need of a Santa Claus for a special event during the Christmas holidays are encouraged to
send an email to: [email protected]
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Inside Pennsylvania | November 2014
15
Freedom Train rolls
along museum tracks
Patriotism feature of annual holiday display
he holidays are a
time to celebrate with
family and friends
and also to be thankful
for the blessings in our
lives. Perhaps the greatest
blessing Americans can all
agree on is our freedom.
It is in honor of that freedom that the
Milton Model Train Museum is proud
to have on display miniature versions of
several patriotic trains from history this
holiday season.
“The Freedom Train is the museum’s
newest acquisition,” said Barry Mabus,
president of the museum.
The model of the Freedom Train
was purchased in honor of the local
celebration of the 150th anniversary of
the “In God We Trust” motto, which
was coined by once-Gov. James Pollock.
Pollock, a Milton resident, worked hard
after the Civil War to promote patriotism.
Each year, committee members feature
new trains and themes at the museum,
which they typically unveil in the fall and
keep on display throughout the holiday
season. Past displays have honored
firefighters, including a special model
of an actual fire truck used in Milton
from 1967 to 1985, as well as ACF, a local
manufacturer of tank and hopper cars.
This year, said Mabus, the goal is to
highlight patriotism in American history.
The Freedom Train ran across the
United States between 1947 and 1949
and was created “as a way to reawaken
Americans to their taken-for-granted
principles of liberty in the post-war years
and the sudden dawn of the nuclear age
and Soviet Union expansion.”
According to documentation on
display at the museum, the purpose of
16
Inside Pennsylvania | November 2014
the Freedom Train was to encourage
Americans to be proud and to display
patriotism. The project got the green light
from then-President Harry S. Truman,
who not only loved trains, but the idea as
well.
The first public display of the Freedom
Train was in Philadelphia, where it
showed off an ALCO PA diesel-electric
locomotive pulling the train, which
carried many of the country’s most
precious documents, including the
Declaration of Independence, the 13
original copies of the constitution and the
Magna Carta, among others.
Throughout the train’s 37,160-mile
journey, the Freedom Train operated on
52 railroads in the 48 contiguous states.
More than 3 million people went aboard
the train on its stops in 326 cities and
towns across the nation.
“The whole idea behind the display is to
reflect on the ‘In God We Trust’ motto,”
said Mabus. “The committee came up
with the idea together as we were talking
about ways to incorporate times that
belonged to Gov. Pollock.”
Other trains on display this season
include the “Spirit of ’76,” on loan to the
museum from Mabus, and the Liberty
Special, on loan from his son, Keith.
The Spirit of ’76 features 13 box cars
representing the original 13 colonies
to enter the United States as well as
a caboose. That train is pulled by a
conventional diesel. The Liberty Special
honors the Liberty Bell.
Other improvements at the museum
this year are a new lighting system that
includes track lighting and will “give a
different perspective to the layout,” said
Mabus. “We also put in a water feature, a
pond-lake area.”
The Milton Model Train Museum is a
place for the young and young at heart
to enjoy a 20-foot by 60-foot-layout that
depicts the town of Milton in the 1950s.
The museum was made possible by a
donation from the late Rev. A. Robert
Walker’s personal collection. It opened
in December 2008 and is governed by a
committee comprised of local model train
hobbyists who oversee its maintenance.
The committee is always looking for
more volunteers, said Mabus, and anyone
who has an interest in model trains is
welcome, no experience necessary.
“People can come down on Monday
Jerri Brouse
T
by Jerri Brouse
The Freedom Train
Stained glass etching
finds new home
by Jerri Brouse
“Everything has a story,” says Rick Wolfe,
founder of Watsontown Glass.
And in the case of the 16-foot glass etching of
a train that recently found a new home at the
Milton Model Train Museum, the story is about
as long and interesting as the train itself.
“It started about 20 years ago when we were approached
by the new owners of Perkins Restaurant in Lewisburg,”
he explained. “They were remodeling and wanted ‘flash.’”
So flash is what Wolfe gave them.
“We did stained-glass skylights, and we also did glass
dividers between the rows of booths,” he recalls. “The
dividers showcased a mix of local historical sites like the
Slifer House, Bucknell University and other local elements
like farming.”
Wolfe and a young man he described as a “phenomenal
artist,” Matt Baumgartner, worked hard for five weeks to
get the work done as quickly as possible.
“He and I did all the designs on the panels,” he says. “In
addition to the others, we also did two huge trains.”
Unfortunately, only about five years later, Wolfe recalls,
“They took it all out.”
Though disappointed, Wolfe says he understood that was
just the nature of commercial work in his field.
The panels he and Baumgartner had worked so
painstakingly on made their way to the basement of
the restaurant, where they sat for years until Wolfe was
contacted by the current owner to see if he was interested
in buying them back. He was.
“Of course, I bought them back,” he says. “They are like
my kids.”
Soon after, Wolfe said, he started a campaign to try to get
www.insidepamagazine.com
The Freedom Train
the panels hung at the train museum.
“I love what they do. The people there work so hard, and
it’s just very cool,” he says.
It took several years, but eventually, a member of St.
Joseph Catholic Church in Milton came forward and
purchased a train panel from Wolfe and donated it to the
museum.
The 16-foot long and 18-inch high framed piece now hangs
in the museum with LED lighting.
“When I saw it, I thought, ‘wow, there is my train,’” says
Wolfe. “I hadn’t seen my train in 20 years. It’s like a ghostly
image of the past, and it’s really neat just to see that train,
the Lewisburg Train Station, the covered bridge … really
so cool just to see my windows again. I’m so incredibly
grateful it has all happened.”
If you’re wondering whatever happened to the rest of
Wolfe’s glass etchings from the restaurant, well, they’re still
around too. A majority of the glass is on display at a dental
office in Watsontown, where Wolfe often gets to enjoy
them.
“He has one full train in his office, and now the second one
is back in Milton,” Wolfe says with satisfaction.
Robert inglis
nights. That’s generally when we get
together to work here,” he said. “There is
no specific time commitment. People can
come and go anytime.”
Located on the third floor of the Milton
Moose, the museum is open for special
events throughout the year but is mainly
open on weekends from Thanksgiving to
New Year’s. It is free to view the layout,
but donations are accepted to help offset
costs associated with keeping the trains
running.
The museum will be open to the
public from 6 to 9 p.m. Nov. 28, 1
to 5 p.m. Nov. 29-30 and 1 to 5 p.m.
each Saturday and Sunday throughout
December. For information, visit www.
miltonmodeltrainmuseum.org.
Jerri Brouse
For a list of Holiday Train displays see Page 31 or visit insidepamagazine.com.
Inside Pennsylvania | November 2014
17
in t he k i tche n: Chef Paul | Story/Photos by Cindy O. Herman
Chef Paul’s Gift Box:
Professional tips for
holiday side dishes!
L
umpy mashed potatoes? Bland, dry
or soggy stuffing? Greasy, lumpy
gravy? Well, it’s the holidays, so we’ll
dig right in no matter what.
But this year, with Chef Paul’s tips, you
can make those traditional side dishes pop
with fresh appeal.
“If you’ve got a recipe that you really like,
well, I don’t want to change Grandma’s
18
Inside Pennsylvania | November 2014
ingredients,” said Chef Paul, standing in his
kitchen with stainless-steel bowls of diced
onions and celery and that one-of-a-kind
aroma of a roasting turkey wafting through
the air. “So keep the ingredients, but play
around with what you do with them.”
Check out the tips below, try the ones
you like and make your holidays merry and
bright!
M ashed Potatoe s
1. Choose your weapon: Starchy baking potatoes like Russet
and Idaho are great for eliminating lumps in mashed
potatoes. But if you prefer the taste or texture of a waxy
potato and don’t mind a few lumps, go with Yukon Gold or
small red or white potatoes.
2. Size matters: Small dice or large cubes, it’s up to you. Just
make sure the pieces are uniform in size.
3. Cook until they’re soft.
4. Drain.
5. This will surprise you: Heat those drained potatoes on the
stove for another minute or so, steaming out the last of the
water.
6. “This evaporates the last of the water,” Chef Paul said.
“Now the dry starch in the potato is crying for liquid. Add
milk while mashing and it will be absorbed and not make
lumps.”
7. Make it hot milk. And now is the time to add butter or sour
cream, if you like.
8. Chef Paul mashes his potatoes with a hand masher. Not an
electric beater?
9. “Don’t need to,” he said. “See how fluffy they got? That’s
what people are looking for.”
10. If you need to keep them warm until serving, transfer the
mashed potatoes to a 13 x 9 inch pan, make small holes in
the top, put a little butter on them, cover with foil and hold
in a warm oven. Alternatively, sprinkle cheese over the top
and hold uncovered in a warm oven. (This makes good use
of leftover mashed potatoes, too!)
With a simple, hand potato
masher, Chef Paul created fluffy,
flavorful mashed potatoes.
Gr av y
1. For flavor, you need a good stock. Chef Paul cuts off the
wings, neck and tail of the bird, browns them along with
any giblets, then makes a stock out of them along with any
vegetable peelings — celery ends, onion tops, carrot peels.
Strain the pieces, and you’re left with a flavorful stock for
gravy, stuffing and soup.
2. You want that good, turkey flavor, but not that greasy
texture, so Chef Paul creates a tender turkey and plenty of
turkey juice by roasting the bird with about two quarts of
water.
3. After the turkey is done, let the juices settle in a bowl or jar
until you can skim most of the fat off the top, leaving that
flavorful juice.
4. Combine the turkey juice and the turkey/vegetable stock.
5. “Now I’m ready for gravy,” Chef Paul said. “I’m ready for
soup. I’m ready for anything.”
6. If you like to thicken gravy with flour, use flour. But be
aware that flour has protein in it, and that makes lumps,
which is why flour is great for dumplings.
7. “Flour wants to make dumplings!” Chef Paul said with a
grin.
8. Cornstarch is a great alternative. Mix some with cold water
Chef Paul skims the fat off the top of the turkey broth
from the roasted turkey. He’ll then combine that
broth with the browned meat-and-vegetable stock he
made earlier, and make delicious brown gravy.
More Tips on Page 21
www.insidepamagazine.com
Inside Pennsylvania | November 2014
19
Come and Visit Us Soon!!
A Town Full of History
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Inside Pennsylvania | November 2014
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to make a thin, white slurry. Whip that into the boiling
turkey stock.
9. “What you get is a nice, brown gravy (because you browned
the wings, etc.) with no lumps in it and with no grease in
it,” Chef Paul said.
10. With the herbs from the roasted turkey and the seasoning
from the stock, Chef Paul merely needed to add salt and
pepper to bring out the flavor in his gravy.
St uff ing
After browning the meat until there was almost no steam
left, Chef Paul browned the celery and onions as well,
scraping the bottom of the pot “because I want all that
flavor.” He simmered the meat and vegetables in broth
before adding toasted bread cubes to make the stuffing.
Stuffing, filling or dressing?
I grew up in Shamokin and Mifflinburg, but both places
served filling, with bread, celery and onions, usually
cooked right inside the turkey and tasting so good!
Chef Paul is originally from Buffalo, N.Y., but has lived
in Central Pennsylvania for more than 20 years now,
so he knows what filling is. But he didn’t at first.
“People would talk about ‘filling’” he said with
a laugh. “I’d think, ‘Are you kidding me?’”
Filling, stuffing, dressing … We all agree it’s that
delicious side dish served at Thanksgiving and
Christmas dinners, but while most Northerners
call it stuffing and Southerners insist it’s dressing,
we here inside Pennsylvania have always called
it filling. In fact, History.com mentioned a filling
made by “thrifty Mennonite mothers” that
combined bread with leftover mashed potatoes.
T urk e y
That’s a new one on me, but perhaps some of our
readers have heard of it or even eaten it. I’d love
to hear from you if you have. Bread and mashed
potatoes together? Are you kidding me?
www.insidepamagazine.com
Chef Paul Bio
Either way, we wish you all a Blessed Holiday
season, and hope you enjoy your traditional
dishes, no matter what you call them!
Chef Paul E. Mach is a certified hospitality
educator and assistant professor at Pennsylvania
College of Technology’s School of Hospitality,
Williamsport, which features Le Jeune Chef, a
teaching-learning, gourmet restaurant. He’s also
the co-host – along with grilled-cheese-loving Tom
Speicher – of the award-winning TV show, “You’re
the Chef,” which ran from 1996 to 2005, originally
in Williamsport and eventually reaching as far as
Japan. The show airs weekly on WVIA (WilkesBarre, PA) Saturdays at 11:30 a.m. and 2 p.m.
1. Here’s what you need to remember: “If you want to add
a little pizzazz,” Chef Paul said, “brown the meat and
vegetables.”
2. If you use meat in your stuffing, don’t just cook it, brown it.
Heat it up until there’s almost no steam and the meat begins
to brown. Mmm. That’s flavor.
3. Celery? Onions? Into the pot for a quick browning.
4. Brown the bread, too! Chef Paul uses whole-grain bread
and browns both sides of each slice on a sheet tray in his
oven broiler.
5. “Who doesn’t like toast?” he said. “And browning it gives
it more flavor.” Even if you choose not to cook it inside the
turkey, the browned bread will give depth to the taste.
6. For Chef Paul’s stuffing he adds parsley and turkey stock
loaded with vegetables and herbs that he made ahead of
time, which adds flavor as well as moisture.
7. “I’ve got herbs in the stock already, so I don’t need to add
herbs,” he said.
8. Stir while heating, and it’s ready to serve without baking.
This can be made a day ahead and warmed on the stove or
in the oven.
1. Remove the wings, neck, tail and giblets. Brown them
before adding to a pot of water to make a stock.
2. Pile on the herbs, under the skin, for extra flavor.
3. “I used rosemary, oregano, marjoram, chives and sage,”
Chef Paul said. “Whatever I had.”
4. Put the red “pop-up” pin near the wing joint, closer to the
bottom of the bird than the top.
5. Add about two quarts of water. And baste frequently, every
10 or 15 minutes. Pour three or four soup-ladles-full of
juice over the turkey, and make sure you get juice inside the
bird, too.
6. “Water helps with heat transfer,” Chef Paul said. The legs,
which are tougher and at the bottom of the pan, benefit
from the wet heat, while the breast, which cooks more
easily, benefits from the steam and the basting. And, “Water
makes gravy that’s not greasy.” Win, win.
Happy Holidays
to all!
Inside Pennsylvania | November 2014
21
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I
S u s q u e h a n n a H e a l t h .o r g / H e a r t
Inside Pennsylvania | November 2014
SHH-0088_Brand_Heart_fp_SDI_PAMag.indd 1
10/8/14 1:54 PM
s
Greetings
Feather trees: Season’
from our family to yours!
No longer
a lost art
Debbie
Brous e
G
by Evamarie Socha
uy Stamm twirls a piece of wire in his fingers, and
little by little feathery fir appears, turning the wire
into a pine branch for a Charlie Brown-looking kind
of Christmas tree.
Stamm makes German feather trees, a late-1800s craft that
has a following among retro holiday decoration enthusiasts
and German craft collectors alike.
The spindly trees feature branches covered in goose flight
feathers, which have a certain length and consistency to
them that makes them perfect for this task. The feather sort
of wraps backwards around the wire, splitting it apart. The
pieces stand erect and impart the fir-tree effect.
Artificial Christmas trees have been around about 100 years,
and German feather trees were among the first. They are
made to resemble the white pines of Germany, which have
wider spaces between their branches.
It was those pines the Germans were afraid of overcutting
for Christmas, and at one point they outlawed fresh
Christmas trees for the home to spare deforestation. This is
when feather trees became a hot item and, eventually, a great
export. Immigrants also brought the tradition with them.
Making the trees, however, has become a lost art, said
Stamm, who taught himself the craft and has been doing this
for more than 30 years. “I studied the construction and found
the materials,” he said, “and the rest fell into place.”
The trees have a very retro look and are a popular offering
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Robert inglis
continued on page 24
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Guy Stamm of The Stamm House in Mifflinburg talks about how he
makes Feather Trees.
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23
A feather tree is made of hundreds of single feathers wrapped in a
circle around branches.
Individual feathers used in making Feather Trees.
photos by Robert inglis
at Stamm House in Mifflinburg, the studio and shop where
Guy and wife Kay Stamm sell reproduced vintage-style holiday
decorations.
Making a tree takes time; how long depends on how high a
tree Stamm makes. A 6-foot version, for instance, took him days
and about 1,200 feathers, whereas a foot-high table-top version
can be done in just hours and with much less plumage.
Size and labor play into the price, too. The 6-foot version
runs about $500, Stamm said, while smaller ones cost less.
Commercially made trees are cheaper but have more of a scrubbrush feel and look.
If you can find an antique feather tree — their delicate nature
makes old ones hard to come by — get it. Those can run into the
hundreds, however, based on their condition.
It’s the charm of the trees that lures one in. It’s neat to see the
branches bloom before your eyes as the goose feathers wrap
around the wire, making the feather tree a satisfying do-ityourself kind of craft. Branches traditionally are topped with a
red berry and attached to a central dowel that acts as the trunk.
The widely spaced branches served several purposes at the
time: giving candles enough space to keep from starting a fire
and ornaments enough room to hang in all their glory.
While traditional trees are done in forest green or white, a
tree’s look is limited only by the maker’s imagination. Two
purple-hued tabletop trees, for instance, stood nicely decorated
inside Stamm House.
“Once you have the know-how,” Stamm said, “it’s a really
interesting project.”
Once you have the know-how
it’s a really interesting project.
A 6-foot-tall Feather Tree at The Stamm House in Mifflinburg.
24
Inside Pennsylvania | November 2014
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Inside Pennsylvania | November 2014
ON SALE NOW
rob inglis
444528
Spicy Pumpkin
Camouflage
your Christmas
L
by Tabitha Goodling
ayer some lace. Blend in some
burlap. Correlate with some
camouflage.
There are many options to decorating your tree and home
for Christmas. Everything from vintage to hunting accents
can be used to keep with the current trends this holiday
season, say local decorators.
Cathy Herrold of Graci’s in Selinsgrove and Micheal Brody
of the Flower Shop at Country Cupboard in Lewisburg
recently gave their insight on what’s new in holiday décor.
The colors for 2014 are white, red and gray, Brody said. He
said an easy way to incorporate these colors into your holiday
decorating would be to walk into your backyard and grab
some twigs.
“Spray paint them with these colors,” he said. “They paint
very easily. Work them with some evergreens.”
Herrold, too, suggested working with evergreens, whether in
the yard or by purchasing them at a local shop.
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Glenn Wagner of The Country Cupboard in Lewisburg talks
about some of the decorations for sale on their camo tree.
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suggested Herrold.
Brody said some white pine also lasts a long time, as does
the noble fir. He noted the needles are short and do not drop
easily.
“You can put those out the day before Thanksgiving and
take down the day after New Year’s and not many needles will
drop.”
Besides the greenery, other items that can be purchased or
found fairly inexpensively are burlap and lace.
“Texture is a big thing on the tree,” Herrold said, noting
these two materials make nice accents.
She also noted that older, glass ornaments are becoming a
trend again.
“A lot of people take their treasured ornaments and use that
as a base for a theme for their tree. You can mix some new
things with these old decorations,” Herrold pointed out.
She said the glass ornaments can also be placed in a glass
vase as a centerpiece coupled with some pine.
One way the old is returning, she said, is by means of the
Roaring ’20s.
“Anything ‘Great Gatsby’ style,” she said, gives an outdors
feel to decoration – in the way people would have decorated
during that time with what they could find.
Like every year, trends change, and next year what’s popular
may be totally diffrerent. Herrold, who has been in business
43 years says some styles “cycle back around.”
Vintage is big this year, said Brody, saying that retro
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Inside Pennsylvania | November 2014
27
ornaments are big sellers. Brody said tarnished silver is ideal as
opposed to shiny silver.
Brody said most items of these popular styles can be found
at local flea markets, your garage, attic — or in your backyard.
“You can also wrap empty boxes with faded wrapping paper” for
the vintage look.
He, too, said that outdoors, old-fashioned, country flare is
making its way back for Christmas.
“Camouflage can be used — not necessarily as a theme,” Brody
said, “but as a little surprise on the tree,” in the form of ribbon.
He said another popular item is gun shell lights or empty gun
shells as ornaments.
Other handy ornaments found in your garage may be fishingbox items — minus the hooks — including sinkers. Brody
stressed these items can be tied into the décor in a subtle way.
“It doesn’t have to be the dominated idea.”
Décor outside of the house, however, should not be subtle,
Brody mentioned. This is simply because people will be driving
by the home and only catching a glimpse of what you have
decorated.
“Think 30 miles per hour,” he said. Use more than just pine
cones and bows.
“Get a flood light to light your door.”
Herrold suggested an artificial wreath which is less expensive
and can be reused year after year and won’t be known to
passers-by whether it is real or not.
The tarnished silver can be used in the form of bells and
ornaments outside, too.
“Keep it simple, but keep it big,” Brody said, “If you can’t see it
clearly when you drive by, you’ve wasted your time decorating.”
Graci’s Flowers in Selinsgrove
has Christmas decorations for
your tree and walls along with
many other holiday items.
If you can’t see it clearly
when you drive by, you’ve
wasted your time decorating.
28
You can find some classic Christmas tree
decorations at Graci’s Flowers in Selinsgrove.
Inside Pennsylvania | November 2014
rob
photos by rob inglis
Cathy Herrold of Graci’s Flowers in
Selinsgrove talks about some of the
miniature Christmas decorations
available at her store.
rob inglis
Here are just some of the many Christmas miniature
items for sale at Graci's Flowers in Selinsgrove.
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Inside Pennsylvania | November 2014
29
FOR OVER 50 YEARS, HODRICK
HAS BEEN SYNONYMOUS
WITH REAL ESTATE
Since the early 1960’s, the Hodrick name
has been at the forefront of real estate in
Central Pennsylvania. William Hodrick, Sr.
began selling real estate after 25 years as a
teacher and football coach. His people skills
easily and successfully transferred to sales
and he formed his own real estate agency in
1965 as Hodrick and Snyder Real Estate.
“He wasn’t afraid to work long, hard
hours to help his clients,” said his son, William
“Bill” Hodrick, Jr., who got his real estate
license in 1969 and began working with his
father.
“My family had the same experience I
did growing up with a father in real estate,”
Bill continued. “There were many evenings
and weekends when I was showing houses
or holding an Open House. It’s an atypical
schedule, yet it’s flexible and easier to work in
quality family time.”
Bill got his broker’s license in 1974 and,
when his dad retired in 1981, he started Bill
Hodrick Real Estate. In 1984, he affiliated
with Coldwell Banker as Coldwell Banker
Hodrick Realty.
In 1988, Bill sold his agency to become the
Regional Market Manager of Coldwell Banker
30
Inside Pennsylvania | November 2014
Mortgage in Washington and Baltimore. A
year later, he returned to Williamsport and
started his own mortgage company while
selling real estate as an independent broker.
In 1991, he opened Prudential Hodrick
Realty which was just the third start-up
company to be awarded a franchise by
Prudential. In 2001, his son-in-law, Jim
Shaible joined the firm. Bill’s son, Kevin
joined the firm in 2010, got his broker’s
license in 2013, and is now the Executive Vice
President and General Sales Manager. Bill’s
daughter, Becky joined the firm in 2012 as the
Marketing and Technology Coordinator.
“Having a son and daughter in the business
with me is very rewarding,” Bill continued.
“Working with family, you get to know them
in a different way, seeing the work ethic you
have taught them put into practice. And, it’s
nice to know that when you step away, the
business you have built will continue in good
hands.”
This year, Prudential Hodrick Realty
became the largest real estate company by
number of sales in the West Branch Valley
Association of Realtors MLS. Along with the
main office in Williamsport, there are offices in
Lock Haven, Lewisburg, and Danville.
In September, Hodrick Realty joined with
Warren Buffet’s well-known and respected
Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices. With
the new affiliation, the Hodrick team of 47
professional real estate agents will benefit
from the technology afforded by the Berkshire
Hathaway HomeServices network.
“This is a wonderful opportunity to be
associated with an international brand,”
said Bill. “Their Global Network Platform
will make real estate transactions faster and
more efficient for our clients saving them time
and money. Our mobile app puts powerful
search tools right into the palms of our clients’
hands.”
The Hodrick Realty agents understand
the marketing value and the responsibility
of carrying the Berkshire Hathaway
HomeServices brand. Their goal is to
become the dominant real estate brokerage in
North Central Pennsylvania.
“The majority of real estate companies
never make it to a third generation,” said Bill.
“I’m sure my dad is smiling when he looks
down and sees what he started fifty years
ago.”
Dozens of working train layouts of all scales and size;
meet Santa and The Conductor.
When: 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Nov. 22; noon to 4 p.m. Nov. 23
Where: Park Place – 800 W. 4th St., Williamsport
Admission: $2 adults, children free. Free parking in rear.
For more information: Visit toytrainexpo.org
rob inglis
Other Holiday Train Displays
The 24th Annual Will Huffman
Toy Train Expo
Lower Anthracite Model Railroad Club
The club has built and operates The Shamokin Lines
which is a 3,000-square-foot HO scale model railroad.
The area being modeled is Northumberland County.
When: 6-9 p.m. Dec. 6 and 13, 1-5 p.m. Dec. 14, 6:30-9
p.m. Dec. 19 and 26 and 3-9 p.m. Dec. 20 and 27.
Where: Second floor of the American Legion Building
(above the Public Library), 210 E. Independence St.,
Shamokin.
Admission: Free
For more information: www.trainweb.org/lamrrc; or call
(570) 644-2248.
Loose Ties Model Railroad Club
With its new club house at the Columbia Mall, the group
can run as many as 30 trains; the largest amount of
multi-gauge train layouts — Z gauge, N gauge, S gauge,
O gauge and G gauge trains.
The club house is open the second weekend of every
month except in November when it will be open Nov. 22
for Santa’s arrival. The club will give away one train set
that weekend. Children 14 and under are eligible for the
free drawing.
A traveling layout with all seven of the above gauges at the
Columbia Valley Mall will be held from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Nov. 22-23
and Dec. 5 and 7, Dec. 14-15. Also, on Dec. 13-15.
The club will be at the Susquehanna River Valley Visitors Center in
Lewisburg with a condensed version of the traveling layout 10 a.m.
to 5 p.m. Dec. 19 and 10 a.m. until 4 p.m. Dec. 21. Free train sets
will be given at each location.
For more information: www.looseties.com; email [email protected]
looseties.com or call president Jeffrey Johnstonbaugh at (570)
473-7973.
Keystone Model Railroad Society
HO gauge trains on a layout representing communities
in Central Pennsylvania. See passenger trains, freight
trains and even Thomas the Tank Engine.
When: 12:30-4:30 p.m. Saturdays and
Sunday only, Nov. 29 - Dec. 21
Where: Centennial Barn at Fort Hunter, 5300 N. Front St., Harrisburg
Admission: Free
More information: (717) 599-5751; http://forthunter.org
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Inside Pennsylvania | November 2014
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OUt a nd ABou t | by Freddi Carlip
Red Cross WWII
Hanger Dance
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dressed as patriotic Bobbysoxers.
From left: John Bower, Michelle Bower, Leon Tillman and Tammy Tillman.
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Robert Callendar (left) presents Al Hess with a certificate naming
Al the honorary chair of the 2014 Red Cross Hangar Dance.
From left: Kathy Rowe, Geoff Goodenow and Rosie the Riveter, aka
Dawn Olszewski, “stepping back in time” at the hangar dance.
On Sept. 27, guests stepped back in time at the Selinsgrove Airport
for the American Red Cross Hangar Dance. And step back they
did with all branches of the military represented at the Red Cross
Canteen.
The music of Seasoned Sounds captured the WWII era perfectly.
The hangar was decorated with Red Cross memorabilia from the
1940s including uniforms, booklets, and information from the
war years. Each table had a centerpiece with the name of a local
person who served during WWII. Model planes and red, white,
and blue stars were used as accents. Those patriotic colors were
used throughout the hangar continuing the theme. Anne Smith,
coordinator of this stellar event, was dressed to the nines with a fox
stole, perky hat, and ’40s-style dress.
Welcome to
True to the Red Cross canteen theme, there was a huge CocaCola chest filled with bottled Coke. Donuts, coffee, apple pie, and
popcorn were typical of the canteen fare during WWII and were very
popular at the Hangar Dance. “Cigarette Girls” walked through the
hangar offering chocolates, candy cigarettes, nuts, and big smiles.
This year’s honorary chair was Al Hess, Jr., of Lewisburg. Al, who
served in the Merchant Marines, was instrumental in seeing that a
WWII memorial honoring Union County veterans came to fruition.
The memorial has a place of honor in Mifflinburg Community Park.
Dancing continued late into the evening. A crescent moon was
shining in the clear dark sky as the strains of Glenn Miller’s
“Moonlight Serenade” ended the evening.
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35
Inside Pe nnsy lva ni a: W in t er Sp orts | by Harold Raker
Wrestling up
a good time
T
ime is running out
and the outcome of
this one could come
down to the final shot.
Fans are jumping. The decibel level is
off the charts. A coach is chewing on his
towel.
Yet there is no round ball in play, no
hoops or nets.
All eyes are on a large mat, with a
10-foot circle, in the center of the gym.
There, two wrestlers push one another,
looking for an opening. One good shot
could lead to a takedown and a win for
the team.
From early December through midFebruary, the scene is played out in high
school gyms across the Valley. Like other
sports, wrestling has its rivalries, when
the intensity level is amped up.
Wrestling essentially has three seasons:
the regular dual meet season, the district
and state dual tournaments and the
individual competitions, starting in
mid-February, where the goal is to get to
Hershey and vie for a state championship.
Yet there is something special about a
great dual meet.
A sampling of that type of match would
include Lewisburg and Mifflinburg,
Lewisburg and Milton, Warrior Run and
Milton or Lewisburg, Southern Columbia
and Benton, and Shikellamy versus
Selinsgrove, Mifflinburg or Jersey Shore.
Basketball fans often have an idea who
will take the last shot with the game on
the line.
In wrestling, a random draw before the
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Inside Pennsylvania | November 2014
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match determines the order in which
the 14 weight classes will be contested.
Therefore, the outcome could rest in the
performances of a pair of veterans or two
kids with little or no varsity experience.
Last year’s District 4 Dual Tournament
match between Southern Columbia and
Mifflinburg was a prime example of the
thrill of a dual meet. The do-or-die match
(the loser was eliminated) went back and
forth and was in doubt until the end.
“That was a fun match to coach,”
Southern Columbia coach Jerry Marks
said. “Even though we lost, I think 10 or
12 of the bouts wrestled in that match
were a toss-up. You didn’t know which
way it was going to go.”
“That is the kind of match a lot of people
want to come and see, a hard-fought
match that comes down to the last bout,”
said Marks, himself a two-time state
champion and three-time place winner.
Lewisburg coach Jim Snyder knows
what it is like to coach such a match. He
Lewisburg’s Maxfield Reed attempts to flip
Montgomery’s Dylan Rupert during the Green
Dragons’ 42-31 win over the Red Raiders last
year during a duals meet in Lewisburg.
continued on page 38
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Inside Pennsylvania | November 2014
37
Amanda august
thrives on it.
The Green Dragons’ success has resulted
in large crowds, including full houses at
Donald H. Eichorn middle school gym
when their local rivals come to town.
“I am coming up for my 20th year (as
coach) and I still get excited about those
matches,” Snyder said. “Those kinds of
matches are fun, and it is easy to get them
(fired up).”
Snyder said that although some coaches
look more toward the post-season, he still
puts a lot of stock in the regular season.
Snyder does not discourage the emotion
of his kids when wrestling in front of a big
crowd.
“Our kids really get fired up when they
are wrestling Mifflinburg, Milton, when
the gym is full. And we pump them up,
too,” Snyder said.
“We tell them, ‘tonight this thing is
going to be full for you. Enjoy it. When
you’re older and going to your job, you’re
not going to have 1,500 fans pulling for
you.’”
Snyder said most of them will be
finished wrestling after high school, and
are never going to have a feeling like that
Shikellamy’s Anthony Best and Mifflinburg’s Darian Trego grapple during the 16-pound
bout of the Braves’ 39-31 win over the Wildcats last year during a duals match in Sunbury.
again.
He has had former wrestlers come to
him years later and recall certain big
matches and how they played out. “They
remember those big dual meets,” he said.
Shikellamy coach John Supsic, a twotime state medalist, competed in an era of
Braves wrestling when the team was one
continued on page 40
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39
Some dual meets to
see this season
December 11:
Lewisburg at Milton
Line Mountain at Juniata
December 18:
Lewisburg at Warrior Run
Central Mountain at Shikellamy
December 23:
Mifflinburg at Lewisburg
January 6:
Selinsgrove at Shikellamy
Southern Columbia at Benton
January 8:
Warrior Run at Milton
Shikellamy at Jersey Shore
January 15:
Hughesville at Southern Columbia
Lewisburg at Montoursville
Line Mountain at Upper Dauphin
January 22:
Shikellamy at Mifflinburg
Week of January 26: District
4 dual tournament
Note: Dates are subject to change
of the best in the state. Crowds were so
large they sometimes had to turn people
away.
While those instances are rare today,
Supsic encouraged fans wanting to see the
excitement that is high school wrestling to
attend one of his team’s rivalry matches.
“There is a lot of excitement. If you are
going to go to your first match, go to
(a Shikellamy match with) Selinsgrove,
Mifflinburg or Jersey Shore. You will see
some of the better matches,” Supsic said.
Recalling a few recent matches with
the Seals, Supsic said, “It is a great
atmosphere and great for wrestling.”
Supsic, who also wrestled at Bloomsburg
University, said high school wrestling is
more exciting than college. “You see a lot
more action, for the most part.”
Supsic said there is a stigma about
wrestling because it is not seen on
television like basketball and other sports.
Moreover, the wrestling shown is usually
college or Olympic wrestling, which is not
the same style that is seen in a high school
match.
“I would encourage people to try it,” he
said.
One of the Valley’s top programs,
and fan draw, has been Line Mountain.
Coach Mike Martz, also a two-time
state medalist at his alma mater, believes
that not only will fans see exciting
competition, they will also get the chance
to watch some of the best athletes.
Martz, also a baseball standout who
played at Bloomsburg University,
advocates athletes playing multiple sports.
But, he said, “I can honestly say there is
not another high school sport that forces
an athlete to be in the same physical,
mental and cardiovascular condition as
the sport of wrestling.”
He added, “There is a reason the
Marine recruiters come to the PIAA state
tournament each year. Wrestling prepares
athletes for life in regards to work
ethic, pride, determination and mental
toughness.”
What makes it exciting, he said, “is that
it is truly a unique sport in that a wrestler
must face their opponent one-on-one
yet at the same time there are huge team
implications riding on each individual
match,” Martz said.
And, perhaps on one last shot.
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40
Inside Pennsylvania | November 2014
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41
Inside Pe nnsy lva ni a History | Story and photos by Cindy O. Herman
The House that
Jacob Built
J
ean Phillips never
forgave President
Dwight D.
Eisenhower for stopping in
unannounced at her home
in Elizabethville, Dauphin
County. Never mind that the
beautiful brick house was
built by Ike’s grandfather,
Jacob F. Eisenhower, in
1854. Never mind that Ike’s
father, David, was born
there, and Ike just wanted to
see this piece of his family’s
history.
Phillips had her own reasons for not
wanting a presidential visit that day.
“She was fermenting sauerkraut in
the basement, and the whole house
smelled like sauerkraut,” laughed Dr.
Louise Jones-Todd, current owner of the
home with her husband, Dr. Howard
Todd. And though Phillips did invite
the Eisenhowers in to take pictures, “she
was infuriated. You have to know Jean.
She was more than a little feisty. She still
hasn’t forgiven him.”
Louise and Howard bought the house
in 1984. Two front rooms and a spacious
barn were enticing for their veterinary
practice, but the property had been
neglected for some time and would
require work. Fortunately, Howard’s
father, a carpenter, saw through the
disrepair. “Don’t let the house scare you,”
he said. “This house is structurally sound.”
Louise and Howard moved into the
house on June 2, 1984. After clearing
away overgrown trees and brush, they
invited the Elizabethville volunteer fire
The neighbors
were so happy
the place was
being cleaned up.
We bought the
dumpiest house
in the nicest
neighborhood
Nothing says "Welcome!"
like a door bedecked with
a Christmas wreath.
42
Inside Pennsylvania | November 2014
department to practice fire procedures
while burning the heap.
“We got hot dogs and had a weenie roast
with the firefighters,” Louise said.
They opened their veterinary office on
July 2, 1984.
“The neighbors were so happy the
place was being cleaned up,” Louise
said, recalling that when she and
Howard bought it, they could see stars
through holes in the attic roof. “We
bought the dumpiest house in the nicest
neighborhood.”
They didn’t know about their home’s
presidential connection until they cleared
some bushes in the front yard and found
a state historical marker.
“I said, ‘Oh, my gosh! There is a
monument here,’” Louise recalled.
In 1854, Jacob Eisenhower paid
$3,698.46 ¾ cents for 100 acres, according
continued on page 45
Baxter, a dwarf pincer held
by Dr. Louise Jones-Todd,
is assured of top-notch
care living in a home owned
by two veterinarians.
President Dwight D. Eisenhower’s grandfather, Jacob F. Eisenhower, built this
house in Elizabethville in 1854. To the right of the home, Dr. Louise Jones-Todd
and her husband added the sunroom, where they put up their Christmas tree.
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Inside Pennsylvania | November 2014
43
HI, I’M JOE TAYLOR. Overton, Texas. What keeps me coming back to the Trail? It’s just absolutely sensational.
I have people tell me what they’ve spent playing one round at Pebble Beach and a night at the hotel, or going to
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Inside Pennsylvania | November 2014
to a Dauphin County Courthouse record.
He built the home and lived there with
his wife, Rebecca, and children for 24
years. Eisenhower babies are buried in the
nearby cemetery.
A minister for the Brethren in Life
church, Jacob preached in the home.
Members came from a 75-mile radius and
slept there and in the barn for the twoday service. President Eisenhower’s father,
David J. Eisenhower, was born in the
house in 1863. The family left for Kansas
in 1878.
With hard work, Louise and Todd built
a home for themselves and their three
grown children: Evelyn, Owen, and
Lydia. They replaced the wood-shingled
roof with fiberglass that looks like slate,
had the bricks cleaned and the mortar
repointed, caulked and painted the
original windows and shutters and added
a fuel oil furnace, a wood burner and a
sunroom.
“We love that sunroom,” Louise said.
When she removed wallpaper in the
front room, she found the faded, original
stenciling, which she intends to trace
before papering over it herself. And
www.insidepamagazine.com
We’ve raised
another generation
of children here.
Some of our
children talk about
living here.
though the house has state historical
status, it is not protected by the national
registry. Louise and Howard pay for
repairs themselves.
“It’s nice that it’s a piece of history, but
this is not the Eisenhower house,” Louise
said. “This is our home. We don’t give
tours.”
The only exception was a few years ago,
for President Eisenhower’s son, John.
“He was very close to his grandfather,
David (Ike’s father),” Louise explained.
“He said, ‘I want to sit on the front porch
and feel my grandfather’s spirit.’”
John’s daughter Susan and her husband
brought him to the house.
“Oh, my gosh, he was a riot,” Louise
said. “He enjoyed seeing the barn. John is
very sweet.”
In 1990, Louise and Howard were
invited to a gala in Gettysburg to
commemorate President Eisenhower’s
100th birthday, but with small children
and a business to run, they couldn’t
get away. Louise’s parents went in their
place and enjoyed the celebration with
entertainment by Bob Hope.
Through church members sleeping
on the floor, to the aroma of sauerkraut
wafting through the rooms, to the day-today activities of two busy veterinarians,
the proud, red brick house has stood for
160 years.
“We’ve raised another generation of
children here. Some of our children talk
about living here.” Louise shrugged and
smiled. “Who knows?”
Inside Pennsylvania | November 2014
45
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Inside Pennsylvania | November 2014
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A shot of last year’s dinner event.
For 60 years, annual dinner
celebrates deer hunting
ago, anyone who legally shot a buck got a
good meal for a few free meal, said Lions Club President Steve
Portzline. The meal used to be held at the
“bucks” is offered in
Richfield Community Building.
January.
These days anyone can attend at a price
of
$6 a person, and it now takes place
It’s the Richfield Lion’s Club Annual
at
the
Fremont Community Building in
Buck Hunter’s Dinner. Held the third
Mount
Pleasant Mills.
Saturday in January every year, the dinner
is designed to pay tribute to the best of
the best buck hunters in the area — and
everyone else who ventured out into the
woods that past season.
It’s a feast meant for the men and
women who spent hours in the cold
wearing orange camouflage and waiting
for those antlers to appear in the thicket.
On the menu each year: ham, green
beans, baked potatoes, corn, pepper slaw
and cake.
When the dinner started nearly 60 years
A
by Tabitha Goodling
It’s a community
event. It makes
people aware
we’re here.
www.insidepamagazine.com
“It’s all you can eat,” Portzline promised.
The money that comes in from the meal
is simply to pay for expenses.
“It’s not a fundraiser,” Portzline said. “It’s
a fun project.”
Chris Kuhn is the publicity person for
the Richfield Chapter.
“It’s a community event. It makes people
aware we’re here.”
The meal was originally held for men
only.
“It used to be a lot of men attended. My
Dad and I each shot a buck and would
go every year. Now women and kids can
come,” Portzline said.
In 2014, 127 people attended. Thirtytwo of those folks brought a rack with
them.
The highlight of the meal has nothing
to do with the spread of food. It’s the
moment the winners of the buck contest
Inside Pennsylvania | November 2014
47
are announced.
The judging is done through the Boone
and Crocket Scoring System. Whether the
deer was tagged by bow and arrow or by
rifle doesn’t matter in the contest. Each
method is treated the same.
Kenny Kantz of Port Trevorton does the
measuring and scoring.
Anything can happen in the scoring,
Kuhn said. “A 10-point can actually be
a 12-point depending if it is typical or
nontypical.”
According to the Boone and Crocket
Club website, the average whitetail deer
is measured the following way: number
of points on each antler, tip to tip spread,
greatest spread, inside spread of main
beams, total length of all abnormal points
(each antler), length of main beam,
length of normal points (each antler) and
circumferences of each antler.
The top three winners are awarded. First
place receives $50; second place receives
$30; third place receives $20. Winners in
2014 included Craig Ridell of Columbia
County, Sam Marks of Middleburg and
Earl Strawser of Mount Pleasant Mills.
The last award is for the “smallest or
the oddest.” That winner receives $20.
hail from Pennsylvania.
The 2014 winner was Dawson Moyer of
Only the buck itself must be a PA native
Middleburg.
— killed in its own home terrain.
The winner does not have to be from the
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48
Inside Pennsylvania | November 2014
come in the stories shared by generations
of buck hunters.
“We have ones who come every year. It
becomes a family tradition,” Kuhn said.
Jane Ketson, the lone female in the
photos pprovided
they can come along and buy a ticket,”
said Kuhn.
The evening also consists of door prizes
from area businesses.
Despite the prizes, the excitement may
Some contest winners of a
previous event with their entries.
Robert
Hoffmaster
DMD
It used to be a lot
of men attended.
Now women and
kids can come.
Richfield chapter, said she honestly
dreaded the first meal before she even set
foot inside.
“But when I got there I enjoyed the
stories. I laughed so hard…”
“There was a time when there were 100
antlers there,” remembered chairperson
Donald Bickhart.
The club recognizes the meal would
never have existed without the late Frank
“Grandpa” Amey who had the idea in the
club’s early years.
It is unknown how many years the meal
has been served. Members believe it is
close to 60 since the club itself is nearly 62
years old.
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Inside Pennsylvania | November 2014
49
Welcome to the
Inside Pennsylvania
business
directory
Appare l & Acce ssor ie s
F low e r s/ F lor ists
Home for the Holidays!
women’s clothing,
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Inside Pennsylvania | November 2014
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Inside Pennsylvania | November 2014
51
Restored church
building has rich
history, hosts
community events
F
by Jerri Brouse
rom the outside, it
looks brand new. The
paint is fresh. The roof
is new. There’s a beautiful
stone patio and walkway
surrounded by pristine
landscaping that leads to a
big wooden door on one
side and a new set of stairs
leading to a similar looking
door on the other.
To stand in front of the Elias Center for
the Performing Arts in Mifflinburg, one
could easily be fooled into thinking this
was some new construction designed to
give the appearance of having been built
in the early 1800s.
And that’s because it’s supposed to look
that way — just as it looked when it was
first built as the Elias Church, in 1806.
After all, that’s the point of a building
restoration, isn’t it — to make something
old look new again?
Step across the threshold of one of those
doorways, though, and any doubts this
building is historically relevant quickly
fades. Thanks to the hard work of dozens
of community members and volunteers,
the structure was saved from destruction
and given a new life.
The process
The old Elias Church has sat tucked
away at the corner of Fifth Street and
Quarry Road for more than 140 years and
truthfully, no one (or at the very least,
few people) ever gave it a second thought.
That is until the property popped up for
sale on EBay in 2004.
How that happened is somewhat of a
long story:
The Elias Church building served the
Mifflinburg community in ways that can
only be described as … diverse. Built
by members of the German Reformed
and Lutheran congregations to serve the
needs of a fast-growing and newly settled
community known as “Youngmans
Town,” it would weather nearly a century
and a half to also find purpose in serving
as a high school, barn-storage, a buggy
repository and eventually a residential
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52
Inside Pennsylvania | November 2014
Photos provided
The restored Elias Church, now known as
the Elias Center for the Performing Arts
This photo shows a southwest view of
the building in 2005, prior to restoration.
home.
That’s what it was when Edith Hoffman
took ownership — specifically, a duplex.
Hoffman, it was reported, was aware of
the building’s rich history and had always
wanted to see the building restored or
preserved in some manner. When she
passed away, her daughter and son-inlaw, Eileen and Mike Wolf, were put in
charge of carrying out those wishes. Mike
contacted Preservation Mifflinburg Inc.,
hopeful the organization would purchase
the property, but time passed and it
looked like PMI wasn’t going to take
action to purchase it.
So, the couple explored other options,
including posting the property on EBay.
That didn’t go so well, either, though,
because the only inquiry they received
was from someone looking to raze the
building and sell the timber.
That was unacceptable to the Wolfs
and when word got back to Robert K.
Lynch, the project manager for PMI and
an active member of the Mifflinburg
community, he wanted to help. Lynch
approached the Mifflinburg Bank and
Trust Inc., where he was also a member of
the board, with a proposal for the bank to
buy the building for $35,000 and donate
it to PMI. They did — and then they
transferred ownership to the Mifflinburg
Heritage and Revitalization Association.
That’s when the real work began.
Had he known what he was getting
himself into at the time, Lynch may have
chosen to walk away once the property
continued on page 56
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www.insidepamagazine.com
Inside Pennsylvania | November 2014
53
Spreck e n sie Pe nnsy lva ni a(ish)? | by Cindy O. Herman
Scranton, PA
or Brooklyn, NY?
W
e give ourselves
away just by
uttering a few
words. Open a really
cool present from the
Beltznickel, or Santa Claus
as some call him, and
say, “It’s chust vwhat I
vwanted,” or “Dis is da
best,” and people will know:
Pennsylvania Dutch or coal
region. Or possibly … Brooklyn?
Clyde Sikorski, “born and raised in Scranton, Pa.,” wrote
last year to share an amusing incident that his coal cracker
accent caused while he served in the U.S. Air Force from
1966 to 1974.
“Over that period I met many people from all over the
good old USA,” he wrote. “On quite a few occasions, while
speaking to another airman or local civilian, my accent
(what accent?) would come up. I would then hear the
inevitable question, ‘Are you from Brooklyn?’”
Clyde would explain that he hailed from the coal region
of Scranton, Pa., but often that seemed to disappoint the
person. People seem to want you to be from Brooklyn, he
said.
“But once, while stationed at Ubon Royal Thai Air Force
Base in Thailand, in 1972, the story changed a bit,” Clyde
continued. “I was enjoying a couple of beers at the NCO
Club at Ubon and talking to a new friend. After a short
time he asked me, ‘Are you from Scranton?’
“He spoke with an accent that sounded vaguely familiar,
so I answered him excitedly, ‘Yeah! Are you from
Scranton?’
“‘No,’ he said, ‘I’m from Brooklyn.’”
Poor Clyde. He sure didn’t see that one coming!
Clyde’s father did his best to get Clyde to eliminate dis,
dat, dese, dem and dose from his conversation, telling
Clyde, “Enunciate!”
But young Clyde must have been a bit of a handful.
“It was all I could do to look contrite and not bust out
laughing,” he admitted.
Now, Clyde, that is not the respectful mind-set we’re
looking for in the youth of Pennsylvania. Maybe da kids
in Brooklyn can get away wi’ dat attitude, but here in the
Keystone State we pride ourselves on our gut manners, and
we don’t appreciate nixy little boys laughing at their elders.
It wouldn’t surprise me one bit to learn that ol’ Beltznickel
had left a sack full of switches instead of candy for Clyde
back in the day. Tsk, tsk.
Our accent gives us away, telling people about our
upbringing and our Pennsylvania heritage. Whether we
say it’s “chust vwhat we vwanted” or simply “da best,” our
accent is a unique and colorful way of expressing our
thoughts. Warm blessings to all our readers during dese
happy, holiday months!
He spoke with an accent that sounded vaguely familiar, so
I answered him excitedly, ‘Yeah! Are you from Scranton?’
54
Inside Pennsylvania | November 2014
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www.insidepamagazine.com
Inside Pennsylvania | November 2014
55
was in the possession of the MHRA. He
didn’t know it yet, but ahead of him lay
close to a decade of meetings and handson demolition work, fundraising and
research. Together with members of the
restoration committee, he would travel to
other similarly constructed churches from
the same time period to learn more about
what the Elias Church once looked like.
Who in their right mind would sign up
for all that work?
As it turns out, Lynch would.
“We visited the St. John’s Lutheran
Church in Brickerville (built in 1807) and
the Bindnagle Church outside Palmyra
(built in 1803) and found they were
nearly identical to the written description
and forensic evidence of the Elias Church
in Mifflinburg,” Lynch says.
While Dianne and another local history
buff, Carl Catherman, handled the trail
of paperwork, the rest of the committee
Going for authenticity
enjoyed the physical part of searching for
Since no one knew much about the
historical clues on location.
history of the building or the restoration
“That was the fun part,” said Mike. “We
process, they brought in people like Frank
looked for clues as we were tearing things
Maintaining a
Stroik, a preservation expert, to help
down. We found a lot of neat things.”
community’s culture
figure out what was what and what steps
The most interesting discovery for
Years ago, the high school in Mifflinburg to take. Dianne busied herself researching both father and son was noticing the
the history of the building by poring
was blocks from where the current
same materials in the building were used
through old files at The Mifflinburg
high school sits. If you didn’t live in
over and over again each time structural
Mifflinburg prior to the 1980s you’d have Telegraph and later at Franklin &
changes were made.
no way of knowing this firsthand, because Marshall College (they maintain copies of
They also found an old song board
The Messenger, a German Reform church
all evidence of the former educational
covered in carvings, presumably made by
newsletter), where she lucked out finding
building is gone.
children, dated May 5, 1928. Holding that
a publication from 1828 that included
Lynch remembers, though, because
piece of wood in his hand, Lynch says,
a full description of the interior of the
having played a part in the physical
made him feel like he was part of the past.
destruction of that building was a pivotal church.
“When we tore this building apart —
Lynch and other members of the
point in his life.
even though you weren’t there back then
committee also paid a visit to Fredrick
“When we tore down that building,
— there is all of this history and you can
Conrad Weiser, a noted church historian
people showed up and wanted to take
see it and feel it as it came apart,” said
and lecturer on Pennsylvania churches,
bricks — they wanted to hold on to
Lynch.
to get a clear idea of what their church
something from that school,” he recalls.
The results
should look like upon completion.
“That was when I suddenly understood
Weiser explained that in the early 1800s,
It has taken nearly 10 years and the
for the first time in my life what culture
German
Reformed
and
Lutheran
Union
project
is finally nearing completion.
was about. It’s a feeling — and it’s
churches
tended
to
be
identical,
with
only
Thanks
to a donation of pews dating back
important if you can save and maintain a
slight
differences.
130
years,
fairly accurate seating was
culture of a community to do that.”
installed
on
the first floor. The balcony is
That’s why, when Lynch heard the old
still
empty,
but
Lynch hopes one day they
Elias Church was in danger of being
will
be
able
to
build
seating there as well.
destroyed, he felt compelled do what he
“The
first
three
phases
are done and now
could to stop that from happening.
we
are
at
the
point
of
maintaining
the
By the time Lynch and the dozens of
building
and
the
property,
”
he
explained.
other community volunteers became
“We still have more work to do, though.
involved, the building where settlers once
We plan to put the steeple back on and
worshiped bore little resemblance to its
hope to, at some point, install original
original state. Walls had been torn down
seating. This could happen next year or it
and new ones built, doors had been added
could take 100 years — it’s all going to be
and windows enclosed. The staircases
driven by funds being available.”
inside had been moved several times for
It’s true Lynch is happy with the
various reasons. A porch had been added
renovation
and restoration of the old Elias
to the front and it was reconfigured into
Church
simply
because the community
a duplex that featured bedrooms and
managed
to
save
a piece of history, yet
bathrooms and kitchens.
he’s
especially
thrilled
that they managed
Fortunately for Lynch, he didn’t have
to
turn
it
into
something
more than a
to look far for help — his wife, Dianne,
showpiece.
was a whiz at researching history and
“We didn’t want it to be a building that
genealogy, so she took charge of looking
was
restored and just sat here,” he says.
up all the relevant information the group
“We
wanted it to be something that was
would need to ensure the restoration was
used
and served the community.”
accurate. His son, Mike Lynch, came on
board as well and soon others followed.
The group began seeking donations and
organized work days at the church to
begin cleaning out debris and gutting the
building.
“We worked twice a week from 9 a.m.
until 3 p.m.,” said Mike. “It took a year
just to get that done.”
We didn’t want it
to be a building
that was restored
and just sat here.
We wanted it to
be something
that was used
and served the
community.
56
Inside Pennsylvania | November 2014
Betz Ophthalmology Associates
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www.insidepamagazine.com
Inside Pennsylvania | November 2014
57
DateBook
Now until December 5
ART EXHIBITION: FIGURATIVE
DRAWING AND PAINTING
COMPETITION
Lore Degenstein Gallery, Degenstein
Campus Center, Susquehanna University
This national, juried visual art competition and exhibition is open to two-dimensional figurative artists (referencing the human figure), working in painting,
drawing or printmaking who are over 18.
This year’s juror is Pamela Wilson, a figurative painter and art educator.
Free.
Visit http://events.susqu.edu
November 22
THE ILLUSIONISTS “WITNESS
THE IMPOSSIBLE”
8 p.m.
Mitrani Hall, Haas Center for the
Arts, Bloomsburg University
Tickets: Adults $35, age 12 and under,
Bloomsburg University students $17
Tickets, information: (570) 3894409,www.bloomu.edu/CAS
November 25
“REMEMBERING A LOCAL
ICON: MARTY D’ADDARIO”
7:30 p.m.
Snyder County Historical Society,
30 E. Market St., Middleburg,
With Larry Jones and Kay Poeth, D’Addario
was a talented musician and well known
eccentric in western Snyder County.
Come to reminisce and recall his musical performances and shenanigans.
(570) 837-6191; www.snydercountyhistoricalsociety.org
November 27
106TH RUN FOR THE DIAMONDS
10:30 a.m.
Market Street, downtown Berwick
One of the oldest races in the country; 9-mile
course hasn’t changed since 1908. Hosted
by the Berwick Marathon Association
(570) 759-1300, email [email protected], www.runfordiamonds.com
November 28
MILTON TRAIN MUSEUM
CHRISTMAS OPEN HOUSE
6-9 p.m.
Milton Model Train Museum,
139 S. Front St., Milton
Huge 20-foot x 60-foot O-gauge layout of
Milton in the 1950s-’60s featuring many operating trains and interactive action scenes.
Free
Contact George Venios at (570) 742-7377;
visit www.miltonmodeltrainmuseum.org
58
Inside Pennsylvania | November 2014
November 28-30, December
5-7 and December 12
December 2-23
TREEFEST
Tuesday through Saturday, 10 a.m. to 4:30
p.m. Tuesday through Saturday; noon to
4:30 p.m. Sunday, closed Mondays
Fort Hunter Mansion and Park,
5300 N. Front St., Harrisburg
Civic Club of the Garden Club of Harrisburg
decorates the mansion with fresh greens,
dried and fresh flowers and fruits. Tours
highlight holiday trimmings and customs of Christmases long ago.
Admission charged.
(717) 599-5751, http://forthunter.org
Fridays 5-9 p.m.; Saturday 10 a.m.
to 6 p.m.; Sunday, noon to 5 p.m.
The Caldwell Consistory, Market
Square, Bloomsburg
A winter wonderland of over 140 live decorated Christmas trees which are then donated to area families in need; benefits Bloomsburg Theatre Ensemble.
Tickets: Adults $6; age 12 and under free
(570) 784-8181, www.treefest.org
November 29-30
FESTIVAL OF TREES
12:30 - 4:30 p.m.
Centennial Barn, Fort Hunter Mansion
and Park, 5300 N. Front St., Harrisburg
Christmas trees decorated by local garden
clubs of the Harrisburg Area Civic Garden
Center, using handmade ornaments. Trees
available for raffle; ornaments for sale.
(717) 599-5751, http://forthunter.org
November 30, December
6-7, 13-14, 20-21
SANTA TROLLEY
10:30 a.m. and 12:15, 1:30, 3 p.m.
Steamtown NHS Holiday Express 10-mile
Train Ride with Santa; bring along your wish
list. Electric Trolley Museum Association
(570) 963-6590 for further information, reservations and to confirm the
2014 holiday trolley schedule. Visit
www.nps.gov/stea, www.ectma.org
December 2
CHRISTMAS CANDLELIGHT SERVICE
7:30-8:30 p.m.
Weber Chapel, Susquehanna
University, Selinsgrove
The annual Christmas Candlelight Service is
one of Susquehanna’s most cherished traditions and includes candle lighting and carols, traditional readings, songs and prayers.
(570) 374-0101, www.susquehannaedu.com/events
December 2-19
TREE FEST OF CHILDREN’S BOOKS
7 p.m.
Rudy Gelnett Memorial Library,
1 N. High St., Selinsgrove
Celebrate the winners of the Judges
Choice tree and wreath and cast votes
for your favorite tree. All proceeds benefit the 2015 Summer Reading program of the Snyder County libraries.
(570) 374-1082; www.friendsgelnettlibrary.org
CHRISTMAS AT FORT HUNTER
December 3-7
PENNSYLVANIA CHRISTMAS
AND GIFT SHOW
9 a.m. to 7 p.m. Wednesday through
Saturday; 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sunday
PA Farm Show Complex, 2300
N. Cameron St., Harrisburg
Christmas decorations, arts, crafts,
clothing and jewelry. Also food, musical and dance groups perform.
Tickets: $7 per person, $5 senior citizens, group discounts
(610) 565-0313; www.pachristmasshow.com
December 4
LEWISBURG HOLIDAY
TREE LIGHTING
7 p.m.
Hufnagle Park, downtown Lewisburg.
Carols, a dramatic reading of “‘Twas the
Night Before Christmas,” and the lighting of the huge tree in the park.
(570) 523-1743
December 6
LEWISBURG VICTORIAN
HOLIDAY PARADE
1 p.m.
Market Street, downtown Lewisburg
Music, horse-drawn carriages and Mr. and
Mrs. Claus. Followed by a free children’s holiday movie at the Campus Theatre at 2 p.m.
Sponsored by The Packwood House
Museum. To donate to or participate in the
parade, call the museum at (570) 524-0323.
(570) 523-1743, www.lewisburgpa.com,
www.packwoodhousemuseum.com
December 6
SEVEN MOUNTAINS
AUDUBON FIELD TRIP
7:30 a.m.
Meet at the CVS side parking lot on Route
192, just west of Route 15, Lewisburg
Local birding field trip. Everyone welcome.
Free.
(570) 837-3377
December 13
DICKENS OF A CHRISTMAS
IRON HERITAGE HOLIDAY
HOUSE TOUR
Main Street, Wellsboro
Wellsboro’s 31th annual festival opens at 9 a.m. with craft and
food vendors, music, strolling, thespians and an early Victorian market.
(570) 724-1926; www.wellsboropa.com
December 7
Noon to 5 p.m. December 1314, noon-5 p.m.
Danville
(570) 284-4502, www.ironheritagefestival.net
December 13-14
CHRISTMAS ON THE BRIDGES
BUFFALO VALLEY SINGERS’
CHRISTMAS CONCERT
1-3 p.m.
Twin Covered Bridges, Winding
Road, Orangeville
Hayrides with Santa, live Music, baked
goods, warm drinks and ham and
bean soup made on site by the folks
at the Millville American Legion.
Free.
7:30 p.m. December 13, 3
p.m. December 14
St. John’s United Church of Christ,
1050 Buffalo Road, Lewisburg.
Admission: $5 at the door for
adults, age 12 and under free.
Contact director Connie PawlingYoung, (570) 568-2183
December 11-13
December 14
26th ANNUAL CHRISTKINDL
MARKET
“CANDLELIGHT CHRISTMAS”
4:30-9 p.m. Thursday, 10 a.m.- 9 p.m.
Friday and 10 a.m. to 9 p.m. Saturday
Market Street, Mifflinburg
Oldest authentic Christkindl Market in the
U.S., inspired by the 700-year-old traditional German Christkindl or Christ Child
Market. Includes festive outdoor huts with
unique and handmade Christkindle treats,
traditional German foods and American favorites, hot Gluhwein, decorations, parades, Elf School, music, children’s lantern parade, carriage rides, St. Nicholas.
Free; donations welcome
(570) 866-0877; www.mifflinburgchristkindlmarket.com
December 13
8TH ANNUAL SKIP HUNSINGER
MEMORIAL CHRISTMAS
SPECTACULAR
Noon
Community Arts Center, 220
W. Fourth St.,Williamsport
The movie “Frozen,” sing-along, gifts, Santa himself.
Free but tickets needed for adults
and children to attend and available
November 29 until they are gone.
(570) 326-2424, www.caclive.com
December 13
CHRISTMAS CANDLELIGHT SERVICE
AT WARRIOR RUN CHURCH
7 p.m.
Held at the historic Warrior Run Church,
Susquehanna Trail near Watsontown
Old fashioned, non-denominational service features a colonial era service and
hymn sing by candlelight. John Ravert
will play the antique pump organ and the
Augusta Regiment will greet visitors and
assist during the service. Bring a blanket and a flashlight as there is no heat
or electricity in the church. Mulled cider and cookies served after the service.
(570) 538-1756, wwwfreelandfarm.org
www.insidepamagazine.com
DateBook
December 6
Susquehanna Valley Chorale’s
Winter Concert
3 p.m.
Zion Lutheran Church, Fifth and
Market streets, Sunbury.
Features seasonal works for harp, organ and chorus with harpist Elizabeth
Asmus and organist David Cover
(570) 547-0455; www.svcmusic.org
December 16
WILLIAMSPORT HOLIDAY
CONCERT: TIME TO REJOICE!”
7:30 p.m.
Community Arts Center, 220 W.
Fourth St., Williamsport
“Carnival of the Animals” by C. Saint Saens
will be the central piece of the program
which will also include music from great
movies like “The Polar Express,” “Home
Alone” and “Frozen.” The Williamsport
Symphony Youth Orchestra will play sideby-side with the symphony, and the 2014
Young Artists’ Competition winner will be
showcased. A Hanukkah medley and a
Christmas sing-along will close this concert.
Tickets range from $5-$50
(570) 326-2424, (800) 4329382; www.caclive.com
January 10-17
99TH ANNUAL PENNSYLVANIA
FARM SHOW
Pennsylvania Farm Show Complex and Expo
Center, 2300 N. Cameron St., Harrisburg
The largest indoor agricultural exposition in the country, with nearly 6,000
animals, 10,000 competitive exhibits and 300 commercial exhibits.
Free; parking $10.
(717) 787-5373, www.farmshow.state.pa.us
Powered by Satisfaction
Celebrating 40
Years of Service
to the Central
Susquehanna
Valley!
Bloomsburg Office
730 Market Street
Bloomsburg, PA 17815
Phone: 570-784-5206
[email protected]
Danville Office
326 Mill Street
Danville, PA 17821
Phone: 570-275-8440
[email protected]
Lewisburg Office
521 N. Derr Drive
Lewisburg, PA 17837
Phone: 570-523-3244
[email protected]
Northumberland Office
236 Old Danville Highway
Northumberland, PA 17857
Phone: 570-473-7300
[email protected]
Selinsgrove Office
715 N. Market St.
Selinsgrove, PA 17870
Phone: 570-374-9200
[email protected]
www.villagerrealty.com
Inside Pennsylvania | November 2014
59
112TH ANNUAL HEART OF
LEWISBURG ICE FESTIVAL
Inside Pe nnsy lva ni a Book s
1-8 p.m. Friday, 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. Saturday
Ice carving; Chocolate Festival Tour;
Frosty 5K; Polar Bear Plunge; Chocolate
Festival Ball; snowball throw, ice fishing,
outdoor birdfeeder making, snow golf.
(570) 523-1743, www.lewisburgpa.com
February 6
ORQUESTA SINFONICA DEL
ESTADO DE MEXICO
8 p.m.
Mitrani Hall, Haas Center for the
Arts, Bloomsburg University
Tickets: $30 adult, $15 under age
12 and Bloom Univ. students
Tickets/information: (570) 3894409; www.bloomu.edu/CAS
February 21
TANGO BUENOS AIRES
‘SONG OF EVA PERON’
8 p.m.
Mitrani Hall, Haas Center for the
Arts, Bloomsburg University
Tickets: $30 adult, $15 under age
12 and Bloom Univ. students
Tickets/information: (570) 3894409; www.bloomu.edu/CAS
“Pennsylvania
Barn Stories”
R. Thomas Berner, 128 pages.
The book showcases 36
barns from 23 counties
throughout the state.
Author R. Thomas
Berner spent three years
seeking out the barns,
interviewing their owners
and taking photographs.
Berner grew up in
Tamaqua and serves
as a professor emeritus of journalism and American
studies at Penn State. He is a member of the Historic
Barn and Farm Foundation of Pennsylvania.
For more information visit www.blurb.com.
Share Inside Pennsylvania with family and friends!
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Inside Pennsylvania | November 2014
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Inside Pennsylvania | November 2014
61
PE nnsy lva ni a Pl a n ts
Story and photos by Dru Aumiller
Queen Anne’s
Queen Anne’s Lace
L
ook deeply into the
lacy center of the white
umbrella-like flower known
as Queen Anne’s Lace, and
you will see a dark, purplish
floret. It is said Queen Anne
was tatting (making lace
by hand) and pricked her
finger, only to have a tiny
droplet of blood fall on the
intricate bloom. From that
point in time, the plant bore
her name.
Just when that occurred is
something of a mystery. Some say the
Anne of the story was the 14-year-old
teenager (of the first line of Stuarts)
who was brought from Denmark to
be queen to King James of Scotland.
Others say the Anne referred to was
the daughter of William and Mary and
the last monarch in the Stuart line who
lived from 1665 to 1714.
62
Inside Pennsylvania | November 2014
Aside from legend, it is known the
4-foot-tall plant was introduced from
Europe and brought with the settlers
to Jamestown as a medicinal herb.
The colonists relied on it as a diuretic,
antiseptic and a treatment for colic.
Its stem and foliage were also used to
make a natural yellow dye.
In addition to its healing properties,
the root tastes like a carrot and hence
it also carries the nickname of “wild
carrot.” Its botanical name is Daucus
Carota (Do-kus Kar-Oh-tuh), and it is a
member of the Apiaceae (ay-pee-Aysee-ee) family, a relative to the poison
known as hemlock. Experts urge
anyone wanting a taste of this early
carrot to be very careful in identifying
the plant correctly. Its leaves are very
toxic and often cause skin irritations to
anyone touching it.
The wild root is yellowish-white and
a cousin of today’s garden carrot.
In the 16th century, Dutch growers
deliberately bred carrots to be orange
in color to honor the House of Orange,
which was the royal family of the
Netherlands. They crossed pale yellow
with red carrots to produce the familiar
orange carrot of today.
Queen Anne’s Lace is found all over
the Susquehanna Valley, as one plant
can produce from 1,000 to 40,000
seeds. It prefers well-drained, fine
particle soil and full sun. A biennial
plant, it only lives for two years — the
first year is for growing and the second
year brings about the beautiful, delicate
blooms.
In the language of flowers, Queen
Anne’s Lace represents sanctuary or
safe haven. It seems fitting then that
its blooms are often included in bridal
bouquets. When carefully dried, the
flower is frequently seen adorning
Christmas trees or decorating windows
and doors. Jewelry, such as pendant
necklaces and rings, can be made from
encasing the tiny florets in clear resin,
and it has been the subject of a famous
poem by William Carlos Williams.
Whether the result of Queen Anne’s
tatting accident of long ago or not, this
ubiquitous flower provides a beautiful
backdrop to life in the Valley today.
s
Emil
Feryo, Sr.
Emil
Feryo, Jr.
NuEar Digital Hearing Aid Systems
Behind the Digital Hearing-aid System sign hanging outside at
Sunbury Plaza is a father and son team with a combined total of 86
years of experience serving the hearing-impaired.
Emil Feryo Sr. said he and his son, Emil Jr., have been doing
business as Digital Hearing-aid Systems for about 10 years or so.
They dispense American-made hearing-aid products manufactured
by NuEar, which is based in San Diego. In addition to the aids,
they also dispense batteries, and other hearing accessories, like
amplified telephones and clocks to wake up hearing-impaired
people. Other services include repairs to all brands of hearing-aids
and making earplugs.
A U.S. Navy veteran and a Penn State graduate, Emil Feryo Sr.
is a second-generation hearing-aid dispenser, with over 56 years
of experience. Because of his father, a coal miner who was deaf in
one ear and severely impaired in the other, Emil was sympathetic
and compassionate to the hearing-impaired from an early age.
He started dispensing hearing-aids in 1955, while employed in his
uncle’s practice.
His son, business owner Emil Feryo Jr., is a 1981 graduate of
Bloomsburg University and was a first lieutenant in the Marine
Corps. In 1985, upon completion of his active-duty military service
and inspired by his father’s commitment to help the hearingimpaired, Emil Feryo Jr. pursued his career in the hearing health
care field. He has been nationally board certified in hearing
instrument sciences for 22 years.
During his years in the field, Emil Feryo Sr. has witnessed the
development of products from the ear horn to the first body-worn
hearing-aids, from the invention of the microchip to today’s 100
percent invisible modern digital hearing-aids using nanoscience
technology, as featured in NuEar’s Imagine product line.
Emil Feryo Sr. explained that old-fashioned hearing-aids were
analog amplifiers. “In other words, we’d amplify one sound, and
we’d amplify them all.” That meant a wearer might have to turn
down their hearing aids because some sounds were being made
too loud.
Modern digital hearing-aids have as many as sixteen channels
that can be programmed for a wearer’s specific needs. Modern
hearing-aids also include filters for background noise. So, the
more filters and the more channels, the better the hearing-aid.
One of the advantages offered by NuEar products is an “active
feedback suppressor” which allows a wearer to use a telephone
without having to take off the hearing-aid.
The senior Feryo explained that to begin the process of getting
a hearing-aid, a customer would fill out a confidential report
providing information about his/her symptoms. “After that, we’ll
go and do a visual inspection of the ear with our otoscope.” That
examination will show things such as the presence of earwax or
the condition of the eardrum.
“Then we do a hearing test on the audiometer.” From that point,
the audiogram report is put into a computer, which will program the
person’s hearing loss to the hearing-aids available. The hearing-aid
is then placed on the patient to show how hearing is improved with
the new aid. The whole process can be completed in about 45
minutes.
The Feryos offer a friendly, relaxed atmosphere in their offices,
and they take pride in providing high-quality products with stateof-the-art technology backed by the service, knowledge and
expertise necessary for a successful practice.
Business hours are from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., Monday through
Wednesday, and 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Thursday. For more information,
call (570) 286-4400.
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www.insidepamagazine.com
Inside Pennsylvania | November 2014
63
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