Briarwood Newsletter - West Irondequoit Central School District

-w
1
t ‘olumc 1,
—
West Irondequoit Central School District
WEST IRONDEQUOIT
SCHOOL DISTRICT
1: Make sense of the problem and persevere
in solving them;
2: Reason abstractly and quantitatively;
3: Construct viable arguments and critique
the reasoning of others;
4: Model with mathematics;
5: Use appropriate tools strategically;
6: Attend to precision;
7: Look for and make use of structure and
V
February 2015
Briarwood School
Newsletter
Dear Families,
It is hard to believe that the month of Febru
ary is already here. Before you know it, we
will be seeing signs next month of spring.
Last month I shared information about meta
cognition and the importance of re
establishing routines after the two week
break. This month I would like to share how
metacognition and mathematics help chil
dren gain confidence and problem solve at
the highest levels.
When teaching mathematics our curriculum
includes the Standards for Mathematical
Practice. The eight practices include the
what, how and why mathematicians think
deeply to achieve:
J.s.suc
They are able to identify quantities in a con
textual situation and use mathematical mod
els to show relationships of those quantities.
Students use their models to think about
what they are analyzing, how they are deter
mining the relationships and drawing conclu
sions. Students interpret their mathematical
results in the context of the situation, then
reflect and communicate on whether the
results make sense, possibly improving the
model if it has not served its purpose.
Math modeling is part of how mathemati
cians problem solve and how they analyze
situations and variables, interpret and draw
conclusions. The math modeling cycle re
quires mathematicians to redefine, reshape
and reorder information in order to make
decisions, problem solve and reflect. When a
student is in the formulating step, he/she
may be using manipulatives, creating and or
selecting a picture, geometric, graphical,
tabular algebraic or statistical representa
tions that describe relationships.
Inside this issue:
Principal’s Letter
Math Parent Guide
2, 3
Curriculum Corner
.1
SBPT News
6
Counselor’s Corner
PTSA News
E News/Library News
8
P.E. News/Musical
Notes
9
Health Office News
10
CARE.
Community Forum
12
BW February Calendar
/3
This diagram represents Model with mathe
matics and the modeling cycle:
Foriite
8: Look for and express regularity and re
peated reasoning.
In the early grades, this might be as simple
as writing an addition equation to describe a
situation, in the middle grades, a student
may apply proportional reasoning to plan a
school event or analyze a problem, and a
high school student might use geometry to
solve a design problem. Mathematically
proficient students can apply mathematics
they know to solve problems arising in eve
ryday life, society and the workplace.
The Mathematical Practice, number 4, Mod
el with mathematics, engages children in
thinking about math from the concrete to
the abstract. Mathematically proficient
students are metacognitive.
Cope
Intep’eI
Developing the depth of students’ thinking
builds in mathematics beyond proficient;
teaching them to be metacognitive of their
learning is the basis for transfer.
Upcoming Events:
February:
•
We are appreciative of the collaboration
between home and school.
Kathleen M. Bush
Principal
Kindergarten Parent!
Teacher Conferences (NO
Kindergarten classes)
2/4
-
•
Evening of Creative and
Performing Arts—2/6
•
NO SCHOOL—2/1 6-2/20
•
Kindergarten Orientation
for Incoming Kindergar
teners-2/26
West Irondequoit
tr1i
Standards for Mathematical Practice
Parents’ Guide
As your son or daughter works through homework exercises, you can help him or her develop
skills with these Math Practice Standards by asking some of these questions:
1. Make sense of problems and persevere in solving them.
• What are you solving for in the problem?
• Can you think of a problem that you have solved before that is like this one?
• How will you go about solving it? What’s your plan?
• Are you making progress toward solving it Should you try a different plan?
• How can you check your answer? Can you check using a different method?
2. Reason abstractly and quantitatively.
• Can you write or recall an expression or equation to match the problem situation?
• What do the numbers or variables in the equation refer to?
• Whats the connection among the numbers and the variables in the equation?
3. Construct viable arguments and critique the reasoning of others.
• Tell me what your answer means.
• How do you know that your answer is correct?
• If I told you I think the answer should be (offer a wrong answer), how would you
explain to me why I’m wrong?
4. Model with mathematics.
• Do you know a formula or relationship that fits this problem situation
• What’s the connection among the numbers in the problem?
• Is your answer reasonable? How do you know?
• What does the number(s) in your solution refer to?
5. Use appropriate tools strategically.
• What tools could you use to solve this problem? How can each one help you?
• Which tool is more useful for this problem? Explain your choice.
• Why is this tool (the one selected) better to use than (another tool mentioned)?
• Before you solve the problem, can you estimate the answer?
6. Attend to precision.
• What do the symbols that you used mean
2
• What units of measure are you using? (for measurement problems)
• Explain to me (a term from the lesson).
7. Look for and make use of structure.
• What do you notice about the answers to the exercises youve just completed?
• What do different parts of the expression or equation you are using tell you about
possible correct answers?
8. Look for and express regularity in repeated reasoning.
• What shortcut can you think of that will always work for these kinds of problems?
• What pattern(s) do you see? Can you make a rule or generalization?
Adapted from pearson :nVisIonVlath aren: Guide 2012
How can you help your child in math?
-Help children practice their addition, subtraction, multiplication
and division facts.
-Encourage children not to give up while solving problems, to
build stamina and develop their critical thinking skills. Don’t give
them the answers ask them to think of different ways they can
solve problems.
-
-Have children illustrate the math they were thinking in their
head and discuss it out loud,
-Have children apply their math knowledge to a real-world
scenario at home, such as doubling a recipe or calculating the
area of a room.
Helpful Websites
Parents
• www.engageny.org
• http://wwwjta.org
• http://mathcommoncoreresources.
wikispaces.com/jPad+Math+ApDs
• https:/Iwww.illustrativemathematics.orgj
• https://www.Ichanacademy.orgJ
• https://xtramath.org/
Students
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
www.multiplication.com
www.Aplusmath.com
www.mathwire.com
www.thinkcentral.com
www.mathblaster.com
www.Coolmath.com
Httr://fun4thebrain.com
Httix//nces.ed.gov/nces
kids
c
GORN
iCUfJJ”
CUR
I9)
Modeling with Mathematics
Todd Smith, K-12 Math Supervisor
“The funtiulatioti of the problem is often na: c es
sential than its soluttou. which may be mereir a
matter ofniatheinaiical or experimental skill.”
-Albert Einstein
how Is \lodeling Connected to the (‘oinmon (‘ore
Statidards for Math eniatical Practice?
In the C’ottimou Core Math Standards there are eight
Nlathieniatical Practices that are the “habits ofniind’
that we want our students to develop over tittie. sIod
cling is at the heart of these. and as rher work throuch
the entire uodehiti process iher will often engage in
all of the practices
Albeit Euisteins quote sunmiarizes the need to
niove niatlieniatjcs education be ond just computa
tions and procedures. Sntdent must he enaaing in
hioh level thinking problems that force them to for
mulate. comp rue. interpret, validate, and report.
A’ they revise and adti:st models until they are ce:tait:
ftc. are cnnecu they are leant ing to “persevere.’
When students report nut their results they are devel
oping their ability to constmct viable arguments.”
When they compute the answer they will learn to use
appropriate tools strategically
Why is Mod eling with Math ematics so I in
p ott aiit
Real life math doesn’t look like voitl pmblenis.
Your boss won’t conic in and ask you .“two trains
left two cities at two different times, when are they
going to collide?” What actuall happens is ou are
often faced with a messy situation, von have to
make assumptions. on have to snnpltfr von have
to use the tools you know and apply
What are
iii e Esseit ti al Coiii pun 11 Is of Math e
in au cal Modeling?
As students engage in mathematical modeling they
will be developing multiple skills that they can uti
lize in many different situations:
•
•
•
•
•
•
They svill leant to simplit’ a complex probletu
and idoiuit ittipottaut quantities and look at rela—
tiotiships.
Ther vili represent mathematics to describe a
situation either with an equation or a diagram and
interpret the results of a mathematical sitiatioti
They will retlect on rvhethet the results make
sense. possibir impmving or revising their model.
When encountered with new situations they will
ask themselves. “How can I represent this niathe
maticallv?”
They will decide which tool is the most efficient
to use in a given situation.
They will apply the mathematics they know :o
solve eveir da: problems.
.“
Why Is loin c Support so mi portait t?
There is a cuhtutal urobleni in A:nerica where it is
uen okay to say, “l’ni not good at math.” This cre
ates an atmosphere where it is okay tint to persevere, it
is uka’ not to check to ensure you ate coned. At
home you can change that culture Sonic addi:io:ial
tips to help our student with math inodelitig ate:
-
-
—
k theni how they know titer are cotiect, and if
A5
the’ don’t know, ask them to veii1- their answer.
Work with them on practicing their math facts and
algorithms. so that they will have the tools neces
sary to solve the pieblems.
Push them to nv to answer a questions in multi
ple svavs and then decide which was the most
e flicien t.
-
Engage them in situation; that arise in your
everyday life that require you to Use niathe
tuatics. Ask them how they might figure out
the answer, then share how you would do it.
School-Based Planning Team
By Mrs. Julie Bisciotti, Grade 1 Teacher
The Briarwood School Base Planning Team met on January 14, 2015. Our School-Based Planning Team includes:
Kathleen Bush, principal, teachers: Veronica Guzzetta, kindergarten; Julie Bisciotti, first grade; Katie Marshall,
second grade; Nancy Reece, third grade; Kim Barlette third grade and team leader; Megan Lentner, school coun
selor and Tabatha Cleckner, parent representative.
Learning and Achievement:
The team looked at student work, K-3, in the area of mathematics, especially with regards to mathematical mod
eling for solving problems, as well as justifying the reasonableness of an answer. Each teacher/grade level was
able to share out an example from a student’s math journal, and it was evident how each grade level builds upon
the other.
Kindergarten Mrs. Guzzetta shared how the students are using concrete materials to make teen numbers
through the use of secret cards and building them with tens and ones.
-
Grade 1- Mrs. Bisciotti shared how this is taken further when teaching strategies to solve math equations. For
example, in solving 7 + 6, the students are working on seeing that 7 and 3 more can make a ten, and then count
on 3 more to get to the total of 13. In addition, the students were working within the mathematical framework,
and explaining the steps verbally and in writing for deeper meaning.
Grade 2- Mrs. Marshall shared how, in subtraction work, the students are working on decomposing subtraction
problems in order to see that they have to borrow from a ten through a multistep process. Additionally, the stu
dents were able to check the reasonableness of their answers through the inverse operation of addition.
Grade 3 Mrs. Barlette and Mrs. Recce shared their work with rounding numbers to the nearest hundred through
the use of Puzzled Penguin. Students have to Justify the reasonableness of an answer and explain if the answer is
correct or incorrect, and explain why or what should have been done. This allows for deeper understanding of
the skill.
-
Culture and Climate:
For Culture and Climate, the team discussed the progress with utilizing the resource, The 7Habits of Happy Kids,
and our on-going work with students. It was reported that the kids are loving the recognition aspect of the hang
ing individual acorns on the poster, class leaves on the tree in the A/P room, and classroom announcements.
Students are able to verbalize the habits and are cognizant of, and able to verbalize how they are utilizing these
habits in their daily lives.
The assemblies and character education lessons for 2014-2015 are as follows:
February 9: Empathy Habit 5 Seek First to Understand Then to be Understood
March 12: Cooperation Habit 6 Synergize
April 30: Self-awareness Habit 7 Sharpen the Saw (Balance feels better)
May 27: Celebrating Assembly for character education
The School Based Planning Team and staff at Briarwood look forward to continuing our great work as a team. The
next meeting will be held on February 11th.
rI,
I
Counselor’s Corner
Hello Parents!
There are many parts to being a good citizen in our community. One of those parts is to be a
good friend to one another. This month, I will be visiting your child’s classroom to teach les
Sons on the importance of friendship, being and good friend and understanding how these
characteristics build a strong and caring community.
One of the parts of being a caring individual is to stand up for others. As a community it is im
portant that we have each other’s back. I like the message that instead of being a “bystander”
we should be “upstanders” and help those around us if others are being unkind or if someone
is feeling down. This fosters good friendships, a strong community and stomps out unkind
words and actions.
Many of the elements we talk about throughout the year are wrapped into the lessons on
friendship and being an upstander. Being an upstander...
Takes courage It’s not easy to stick up for one another. Sometimes it takes courage to
stand up and tell someone to stop hurtful behavior.
Takes action A good friend and upstander does not sit back, they take action by showing
care and concern for their friends.
Takes assertiveness Telling a friend how their behavior makes you feel and how it affects
others requires being able to use your voice!
Takes compassion Upstanders have the gift of compassion. They recognize when some
one is hurt and take steps to help.
Takes leadership Upstanders are leaders in their social group, helping others to recognize
ways to get along and be supportive to others.
—
=
-
-
-
-
There is a lot of great information out there about how to foster kindness and acceptance. A
quick google search of “upstander” will yield countless tools to help kids understand the im
portance of caring for one another. Have a conversation with your child about how important
it is to stand up for themselves and for one another!
If you have any questions, please feel free to call me. Thank you for your continued support in
helping our children learn and grow!
.‘.
Warmly,
Meghan Lentner, MSEd, NCC
School Counselor
Briarwood/Colebrook Schools
i...
steadfasttrue
‘friendsh i p
lI’.iLfl
,
.
.
h el pfu I
believe
PTSA NEWS
It’s hard to believe we’re almost halfway through the year already! We hope everyone had a
wonderful holiday!
The Bubble Man came to Briarwood School through Young Audience of Rochester and the
kids had so much fun! They really enjoyed watching him and they also learned some inter
esting things about science. Our next assembly, “In Jest,” will be on Wednesday, March 18th.
Wintry Wednesday is in full swing! The children are having a ball participating in various ac
tivities from board games to coloring and crafts. This program helps break up the week when
it’s too cold to go outside during these bitter winter months.
th
Evening of Creative and Performing Arts is coming up on February 6
at 6:30 p.m. This is a
special evening for our Briarwood students to shine! All are welcome to come and support
those who are showcasing their talents. Please contact Alicia Castellon at
leasheys75@gmail.com with any questions regarding this event.
A HUGE THANK YOU to everyone who sent in Box Tops! So far we’ve raised over $460 for
our school programs!!! Box Tops for Education is a great way for our school to raise money to
help support the many events and programs year after year. It’s as easy as clipping the cou
pons from many of the products you may already have in your cupboard.
UPCOMING EVENTS:
th
Family Event Friday, March 6
at 6:30 p.m.—Keep an eye out for details.
th
Open House/Ice Cream Social Thursday, March 19
at 6:30 p.m.
th
10
Family Breakfast Friday, April
at 8:30 a.m.
If you have any questions, concerns or ideas, please contact any one of your Building Repre
sentatives. Thanks again for all your continued support!
Tina Scacchitti
tms0727@yahoo.com
Teresa Hayes
crazyhayes06@yahoo.com
Brigid McClenathan brm117@gmail.com
0
a
te
Library Media News
Mrs. Forties
First graders are using nonfiction informa
tional books to learn true facts about topics
Important Information
Briarwood School
336-1610
Miss Bush Principal
Mrs. Stout Secretary
Mrs. Sementelli Nurse
Superintendent’s Office... .336-2983
Transportation Office
336-2992
Site:
Web
www.westirondeguoit.org
-
-
such as nocturnal animals in winter, bald
eagles, raccoons, and Abraham Lincoln.
They are learning beginning research skills
using a KWL graphic organizer and answer
ing research questions about a topic using
only the true facts found in given sources.
They will also share a Valentine’s Day story.
-
Second graders will be learning about
American Tall Tale Heroes. The students will
listen to tales about such heroes as Paul
Bunyan, John Henry, Pecos Bill, and Sally
Ann Thunder Ann Whirlwind Crockett. The
students will discuss the exaggeration and
humor present in each story and how these
tall tales helped the early settlers in our
country deal with their hardships and strug
gles. They will also learn about the genre of
Mystery fiction when we read, Nate the
E- News
E-news is a way of communicating with Briarwood
parents. Weekly we will send out e-mails with
attachments of the round trip folders including the
weekly news, the monthly newsletter and other
important information. In addition, district infor
mation will occasionally be sent home. We will con
tinue to send home printed newsletters and letters,
but e-news allows us to send messages to you
quickly at home or at work.
To register, send an e-mail to;
Briarwood_e-news@westiron.monroe.edu
Include your child(ren)’s name(s) and grade(s) in the
body of your e-mail. Your e-mail address will re
main confidential.
We will only use e-mail addresses that have been
e-mailed to this special account. When you change
your e-mail address, please let us know so you will
continue to receive our updates.
Great and the Mushy Valentine by Marjorie
Weinman Sharmat.
Third graders are involved in a Biography
unit. They are listening to books which con
tain true information about the lives of Wil
son A. Bentley, Edward Kennedy Ellington,
Harriet Tubman, and Abraham Lincoln. They
are discussing each famous person’s child
hood, education, jobs and contributions to
the world. They are considering the theme
of perseverance and how each of these
people achieved amazing things during their
lifetimes despite difficulties, failure, or oppo
sition. The students will also learn how to
construct a timeline for a famous person’s
life.
All students are encouraged to visit the li
brary frequently to check out books and
magazines or to use the computers or other
reference materials for research.
PHYSICAL EDUCATION NEWS
Dear Families,
In physical education class, we have just introduced our theme of fitness and lifelong weilness. Your
children are in the process of learning and experiencing the Cardiovascular Endurance fitness compo
nent. We have discussed in class that the word cardio means heart, the word vascular means lungs
and the word endurance means an extended period of time. In other words, we have taken a complex
vocabulary word and have broken it down for better understanding and application to class activities.
As the weeks continue, we will continue to explore movement that focuses on strengthening our Cardi
ovascular Endurance fitness level as well as exploring the other areas of fitness (Muscular Strength,
Muscular Endurance and Flexibility).
As always, please remind your children to bring proper footwear to PE class and feel free to contact me
with any questions that you might have.
Sincerely,
Brian Maginn
Physical Education Teacher
Brian Maginnwestiron.monroeedu
MUSICAL NOTES
From lovesick moose to gooey-sweet chocolate valentines, the month of February promises
some fun songs in music class.
One of the things all the grades will be working on this month is musical form. Third grades
will continue studying forms like canon and rondo. We’ll experience these forms by listening,
performing, and moving to music. Second grade will also be looking at musical forms using
different movements to represent the different sounding sections of AB and ABA songs. In
first grade we are beginning to understand musical form in distinguishing between same and
different sounds, instruments, and movements. In addition, there will be several fun games
reviewing rhythms and dynamics. Although it’s a short month we’re still going to pack it full of
music!
Marc Falco
Music Teacher
Health News:
Asthma
Mary Jane Sementelli, RN
The changes in seasons and colder temperatures are bringing students to the Health Office
with complaints of wheezing, shortness of breath, coughing and chest tightness. These are
the common symptoms of asthma, a disease of the airways that makes breathing difficult.
The bands of muscle surrounding the airways tighten and limit air flow in and out of the
lungs. Inflammation can cause swelling which narrows the bronchial tubes, and mucous can
obstruct the airways. According to the Centers for Disease Control, the rate of childhood
asthma has more than doubled since 1980.
Early warning signs that can occur before an asthma episode include feeling tired, weak or
breathless when exercising, wheezing or coughing after exercising, a frequent cough at night
that interrupts sleep, or a cough that lasts more than a week.
Factors that can lead to breathing difficulties or an asthma episode are called “triggers.” In
door triggers include smoke, dust mites, molds, vapors from cleaning products and perfumes.
Outdoor triggers include pollen, air pollution and cold air. Respiratory tract infections, exer
cise and emotional stress can also lead to an asthma episode. It’s important to recognize
what your triggers are and avoid exposure to them.
Medications may be prescribed by your health care provider to treat these symptoms.
“Reliever/rescue medicines” (inhalers) are considered quick acting medications that can be
used as needed to relieve symptoms. They may also be prescribed by your doctor to be given
prior to exercise or sports as a preventative measure for those who experience exercise in
duced asthma. For those with frequently occurring asthma symptoms “controller medicines”
may be prescribed to be given on a regular basis. Talk with your doctor to determine the best
way to treat your child’s signs and symptoms of asthma.
If your child uses a rescue inhaler at home, you may want to consider having one in school.
As with any medication given in school, the school nurse will need a written order form your
doctor for the medication, a parent or guardian’s written permission to administer the medi
cation in school, and the medication delivered to the Health Office by the parent or guardian
in a properly labeled original container.
Your child’s asthma can be controlled. Contact your primary health care provider or your
school nurse, Mary Jane Sementelli at 336-1618 with questions or concerns.
FI LS
SFAJ3 CXV
The 7 Habits of Happy Kids is part of our Character Education
Program. Each month the students come together as a school in
either an assembly or small group instruction about a character
trait and they participate in activities. On these specified days
we would like for the students to wear their Briarwood T-Shirts.
Upcoming C.A.R.E. dates are:
February 9, March 12, April 30, and May 27.
THANKS from all of us at Briarwood School!
2014-2015
j
Standardized Testing
TerraNova Grade 2
June 1-5
NYS ELA Grade 3
Make Up
April 14, 15, 16
April 17-21
NYS Math Grade 3
Make Up
April 22, 23, 24
April 27-29
I
Pet Owners
Residents are reminded that for the safety of all
of our students and visitors, pets are not al
lowed on any of our campuses when students
are present, including during athletic competi
tions.
At other times, pets must be leashed and under
control. Please comply with requests from
school district security and athletic supervisory
personnel regarding pets on our grounds.
Please note: NYS tests must be given on the
above dates. Please consider these dates
when scheduling appointments for your
child.
And-thank you for cleaning up after your animal,
keeping our walkways and fields more pleasant
for everyone!
Annual Community Forum
#trending
ISSUES FACING TEENS
Alcohol/and Other Drugs
Social Media
Sponsored by the
East lrondequoit Central School District, West lrondequoit Central School District,
Bishop Kearney High School, PTSAs, and rondequoit Police Department
th
Monday, March 9
7:00 p.m.
lrondequoit High School Auditorium
260 Cooper Road
PANEL OF EXPERTS INCLUDES:
Sandra Doorley
Monroe County District Attorney
Honorable Joseph Genier
Irondequolt Town Judge
Keith S. Greer, L.C.S.W., RC.C.
Executive and Weliness Coach
Mike Johansson
Senior Lecturer, Media Consultant, RIT
Officer Andrew Whitaker
Irondequoit Police Officer
Dr. Taylor Starr
Adolescent Medicine, Pediatrics; University of Rochester
:f’
For questions, p’ease contact:
UIDERAGE
DRINI(NG
Rita Dulaney @ 336-2921
Rita Dulaney@westiron rnonroe.edu
Briarwood School
February 2015
Sun
I
Mon
CDui
Tue
3DDuv
Wed
4EDrn
Thu
5SDai
No Kindergarten(Par. 1 clii.) Conf.
Wintr Wednesda
8
15
Sat
6ADcri
ECAPA 6:30
9BDcru
(.A.R.E. Groups
JOCDai
16
IE
18
19
NO SCHOOL
No SCHOOL
NO SCHOOL
NO SCHOOL
.5ADai
24BDai’
11DDii
Fri
l2EDav
I3SDciv
Wintry \\ednesday
‘SCDuu
Incoming Kdgn.
Orientation 15-16
7:00-8:00
NO SCHOOL
74
BRIARWOOD SCHOOL
WEEKLY NOTES TO HOME
JANUARY 28, 2015
ECAPA...ls quickly approaching! It’s next week, Friday, February 6” at 6:30 p.m. Be sure to
read the flyer in this round-trip folder regarding last minute instructions, and two after-school
rehearsals that you MUST give permission for if your child is going to stay after to practice on
gth and 30th.
January 2
DUE TO...Parent/Teacher Conferences, there will be NO Kindergarten classes on Wednesday,
th• Mrs. Guzzetta will be contacting you regarding setting up conference times.
February 4
Also...
A REMINDER... Due to President’s Week, there will be NO SCHOOL February 16-20. Regular
classes will resume on Monday, February 23rd. It is an “A” Day.
COMMUNITY CUPBOARD...We are once again collecting items for the lrondequoit Community
Cupboard. For the month of February we will be collecting any kind of cereal (boxed, oatmeal,
etc...) Please be generous with your donations. Many of our neighbors can use a helping hand,
so just have your son/daughter bring in the item and place it in the collection box in the office.
Thanks for your help!
LETTER DAY SCHEDULE...Below is a list of what “Specials” take place on each letter day for grades
1-3. Please be sure to send your child in with sneakers on Physical Education (P.E.) days.
Grade 1
A Day Music
B Day P.E.
CDay-Art
D Day Music & Library
EDay-P.E.
S Day P.E.
—
-
—
—
Grade 2
A Day Music
B Day P.E.
CDay-Art
D Day Music & Library
EDay-P.E.
S Day P.E.
—
-
—
—
Grade 3
A Day Music
B Day -P.E.
CDay-Art
D Day Music & Library
EDay-P.E.
S Day P.E.
—
—
—
3
West Irondequoit Schools
February 2015
Breakfast Menu
Grades K-3
Monday
Tuesday
Wednesday
Thursday
Friday
Breakfast Breaks
Assorted Juices
Assorted Fruit
Milk
Pillsbury Cini Minis
Assorted Juices
Assorted Fruit
Milk
Breakfast Breaks
Assorted Juices
Assorted Fruit
Milk
Pillsbury Mini Pancakes
Assorted Juices
Assorted Fruit
Milk
5
Breakfast Breaks
Assorted Juices
Assorted Fruit
Milk
Pillsbury Mini Waffles
Assorted Juices
Assorted Fruit
Milk
12
9
Breakfast Breaks
Assorted Juices
Assorted Fruit
Milk
WINTER RECESS
NO SCHOOL
WINTER RECESS
NO SCHOOL
2
3
9
Pillsbury Mini French Toast
Assorted Juices
Assorted Fruit
Milk
10
Breakfast Breaks
Assorted Juices
Assorted Fruit
Milk
WINTER RECESS
NO SCHOOL 9
WINTER RECESS
NO SCHOOL
17
16
Breakfast Breaks
Assorted Juices
Assorted Fruit
Milk
23
22
Pillsbury Cini Minis
Assorted Juices
Assorted Fruit
Milk
24
4
Breakfast Breaks
Assorted Juices
Assorted Fruit
Milk
11
WINTER RECESS
NO SCHOOL
18
Breakfast Breaks
Assorted Juices
Assorted Fruit
Milk
25
Pillsbury Mini Pancakes
Assorted Juices
Assorted Fruit
Milk
26
contain at least 50% whole grain)
6
13
19
New Requirements for the
School Breakfast Program:
 All grains must be
whole-grain rich(must
20
 At least 1 full cup of fruit
must be offered daily,
and students are
required to take at least
a half cup (so students must
take either a juice or a fruit, which
may be either fresh or canned, in
addition to the main entrée and
the milk)
Student Breakfast $1.50
Faculty & Staff Breakfast $2.50 (tax included)
Breakfast Breaks
Assorted Juices
Assorted Fruit
Milk
27
Breakfast $1.50 Student milk $0.50 Milk choice: 1% white or fat free chocolate & skim. Faculty & Staff Breakfast $2.50 tax included. Now you can pay for
your meals on-line. Visit our website: www.westirondequoit.org . Once there, Food Services is listed under “District”. Menu is subject to change without
notice. This institution is an equal opportunity provider and employer.
Looking for part-time employment while your children are in school? Call the Nutritional offices at 336-2953 and ask for Betsy!!
West Irondequoit Schools
February 2015
Monday
Tuesday
Hamburger or Cheeseburger
on a Bun
Sweet Potato Fries
Raw Veggie Sticks
Diced Pears
Assorted Fresh Fruit
Milk
2
Pasta with Meat Sauce
Green Beans
Raw Veggie Sticks
Applesauce
Assorted Fresh Fruit
Milk
Zweigle’s Hot Dog on a Bun
Tangerine Chicken
French Fries
Raw Veggie Sticks
Diced Pears
Assorted Fresh Fruit
Milk
Brown Rice
Raw Veggie Sticks
Applesauce
Assorted Fresh Fruit
Milk
10
9
16
Chicken Nuggets
Bush’s Baked Beans
Raw Veggie Sticks
Diced Pears
Assorted Fresh Fruit
Milk
Wednesday
3
4
10
WINTER RECESS
NO SCHOOL
WINTER RECESS
NO SCHOOL
23
Grades K-3
Lunch Menu
Thursday
Maple Glazed French Toast
Sticks with Sausage Links
Steamed Broccoli
Raw Veggie Sticks
4 oz. 100% Juice
Assorted Fresh Fruit
Milk
4
Breaded Chicken Drummies Pizza!!
Chicken Poppers
Macaroni & Cheese
Pizza!!
Bush’s Baked Beans
Raw Veggie Sticks
4 oz. 100% Juice
Assorted Fresh Fruit
Milk
Mixed Vegetables
Raw Veggie Sticks
Golden Diced Peaches
Assorted Fresh Fruit
Milk
12
913112
Leafy Green Salad
Raw Veggie Sticks
Mixed Fruit
Assorted Fresh Fruit
Milk
11
WINTER RECESS
NO SCHOOL
17
18
Taco with Trimmings & 16
Brown Rice
Seasoned Corn
Raw Veggie Sticks
Applesauce
Assorted Fresh Fruit
Milk
24
Friday
Tater Tots
Raw Veggie Sticks
Golden Diced Peaches
Assorted Fresh Fruit
Milk
WINTER RECESS
NO SCHOOL
18
19
Breaded Mozzarella Sticks
17
w/Marinara
Sliced Carrots
Raw Veggie Sticks
4 oz. 100% Juice
Assorted Fresh Fruit
Milk
25
5
Spinach Salad
Raw Veggie Sticks
Mandarin Oranges
Fresh Fruit
Milk
13
Student lunch $2.55
WINTER RECESS
NO SCHOOL
Faculty & Staff lunch $4.05 (tax included)
21
20
19
Chicken Patty On A Bun 2
0
18
Mashed Potatoes & Gravy
Raw Veggie Sticks
Fruit Cocktail
Assorted Fresh Fruit
Milk
26
6
Five Components make a meal:
meat, or meat alternate, grain,
fruit, vegetable and milk. You
can have everything but you
must choose 3 items and one
must be either ½ cup fruit or ¾
cup vegetable.
Pizza!!
Romaine Salad
Raw Veggie Sticks
Mandarin Oranges
Assorted Fresh Fruit
Milk
19
27
Lunch $2.55 Student milk $0.50 Milk choice: 1% white or fat free chocolate & skim. Faculty & Staff Lunch $4.05 tax included. Now you can pay for your
meals on-line. Visit our website: www.westirondequoit.org . Once there, Food Services is listed under “District”. Menu is subject to change without notice.
This institution is an equal opportunity provider and employer.
Looking for part-time employment while your children are in school? Call the Nutritional offices at 336-2953 and ask for Betsy!!
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
Evening of Creative and Performing Arts Rehearsal
*
*
For all PERFOMING on stage
Thursday January, 29, 2015 Grades K, 2
Friday, January 30, 2015 Grades 1, 3
3:10-3:50 both days
Please come with your music on a CD, labeled with the
number and your name. We will not be using I pods and
tablets for music. Mabe sure that your music is appropriate
and that you are ready with your act. Practice ahead of time!
© See you there!
IMPORTANT!!
You MUST send in a permission note if your child is staying for
either of these practices. In it, please include who will be
picking up at 3:50 p.m. Keep in mind, your child will NOT be
allowed to stay if they do not have a note. Thank you.
Any questions,
Alicia Castellon 943-9236
*********************************************************************
*
*
A
IA
1.
A
1
A
A
lIlA
A
111111
,AA
lIlA
/
/A/A
III
II
l.A
ill
A,
A
A/
1)11111
A
.
lIlA
AA
f.A.A
A
/1
A//A
A
11111111111111111111111
/A/A/A/A/A
II
111111111111
It’s Almost Time!
ATTENTION Artists and Performers: the following is important
information regarding The Evening of Creative and Performing
Arts. It is Friday, February 6th at 6:30 pm. The evening will begin with
performances at 6:30 in the All-Purpose room.
Performers
1. Please arrive a few minutes early to get yourselves settled in.
2. Please consult the program to see when you’ll perform.
3. There will be an “on-deck” area on the P.E mats in front of the stage for
the performers to wait for your turn. Please sit nicely while others are on
stage.
4. One of the “moms” will be getting the next act ready on the side of the
stage. Please try to line up with her as quietly as possible.
4. Please have your music ready. Bring your CDs labeled with your name
and trcith number to the scheduled rehearsal so we can have all the music
ready and organized for the show,
5. Have fun! Remember to smile! We are all there to applaud for you!
6. When you are finished performing, remember to take a bow! You
earned it! Then, Ms. Bush will present you with a certificate.
7. Remember to be a good audience for the other performers! Listen
quietly while they are performing, and then applaud for them when they
are done.
Artists
1. Drop off your displays in the Main Office on Thurs, Feb. 5th before 3:00
pm. Please remember to put your name and grade on It! We will
display them for you.
2. After the performances are finished, go find your artwork/display in the
hall. They are grouped by grade level. Once you find it, stay with it so
everyone can visit with you and your display and tell you how awesome it
is! Miss Bush will meet with each artist and give you a certificate. Please
remember to take your artwork/display with you when you go home.
‘A.