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Compton Bassett Strategic Environmental Assessment
COMPTON BASSETT NEIGHBOURHOOD PLAN
2015 – 2030
Sustainability Assessment
Welcome to Compton Bassett
A Domesday Book Village
Page 1
Compton Bassett Strategic Environmental Assessment
Executive Summary
Compton Bassett Parish Council are intending to produce a Neighbourhood Plan for 2015-2030.
The Compton Bassett Neighbourhood Plan designated area includes an area of outstanding natural
beauty (AONB) known as the North Wessex Downs and an area in the centre of Compton Bassett
which was designated as a Conservation Area on 28 May 1991 by North Wiltshire Council. In
addition, Compton Bassett is close to two of Wiltshire’s World heritage sites, Avebury (5 miles) and
Stonehenge (20 miles).
Although it was initially thought that the scale of the proposed development within a previously
consented development area was too small to cause any significant environmental impact, Compton
Bassett Parish Council wanted to include a Strategic Environmental Assessment as good practice due
to the central importance of the AONB and conservation area to the Compton Bassett
Neighbourhood Plan. In addition, Wiltshire Council’s screening opinion confirmed that a Strategic
Environmental Assessment would be required to ensure, inter alia, that the proposals presented in
the Compton Bassett Neighbourhood Development Plan contribute towards the achievement of
sustainable development.
This report is in the form of a Sustainability Assessment incorporating the legal requirements of the
EU Strategic Environmental Assessment of Plans and Programmes (The Strategic Environmental
Assessment (SEA) Directive) and incorporates comments from the statutory consultation bodies:
Natural England, English Heritage and the Environment Agency.
The Sustainability Assessment (incorporating the SEA Directive requirements) includes a detailed
assessment of the likely effects of the Compton Bassett Neighbourhood Plan on Heritage;
Biodiversity; Landscape (particularly the AONB); Air quality & environmental pollution; Water
resources, climate change & flood risk; Land & soil resources; Human population (demographics,
employment, education, housing & health); Infrastructure (Transport, material assets, broadband,
waste & renewable energy) and significant effects have been found in a number of areas. As a result
the Compton Bassett Neighbourhood Plan has been slightly revised and clarified in line with
comments from Natural England, English Heritage and the Environment Agency. A number of
comments from Wiltshire Council have also been incorporated where appropriate.
It is concluded that the sustainability assessment framework can be used to identify the potential
adverse impacts of future developments so that they can be reduced and/or mitigated, particularly
by promoting the use of brownfield sites within the Compton Bassett designated area which will be
of significant benefit to the Compton Bassett Parish Council, Wiltshire Council and individuals who
might be affected by any future proposed development.
The Sustainability Assessment report is a key output of the appraisal process and will support the
Compton Bassett Neighbourhood Plan when both documents are submitted to Wiltshire Council,
prior to detailed examination by the planning inspector.
Page 2
Compton Bassett Strategic Environmental Assessment
Table of Contents
Chapter 1. Introduction and Methodology
4
Chapter 2. Sustainability Assessment Methodology
10
Chapter 3. Identifying Sustainability Issues
60
Chapter 4. Sustainability Assessment of Alternatives
69
Chapter5. Consideration of Cumulative Effects
84
Chapter 6. Monitoring
85
Chapter 7. Conclusions
90
Chapter 8. Next Steps
90
Appendix 1: SEA Quality Assurance Checklist
91
Appendix 2: Habitats Regulations Assessment
93
Appendix 3: Statutory Consultee Comments
99
Page 3
Compton Bassett Strategic Environmental Assessment
Chapter 1. Introduction and Methodology
The Localism Act (2011) reformed the planning system to give local people the opportunity to shape
their community and, in 2012, this was re-enforced by the National Planning Policy Framework (NPPF
2012) to further help local people to agree appropriate Neighbourhood Plans for sustainable
development in their community.
The Minister for Planning has stated that sustainable development is about change for the better so
that we hand on a better world than the one we inherited and has referred to protecting our natural
and historic environment as well as improving our standard of design and that:
“Our historic environment, buildings, landscapes, towns and villages
can better be cherished if their spirit of place thrives, rather than withers”
“with no local plan in place there will be a presumption
in favour of sustainable development”
“Planning permission must be determined in accordance with the development plan”
The Compton Bassett Neighbourhood Plan is primarily about the use and development of land and
buildings and will form the basis for determining local planning applications within the plan area and,
once adopted, the Compton Bassett Neighbourhood Plan have the same legal force as any other part
of the official Development Plan – the policy that controls what happens in terms of the use and
development of land.
The objectives of the Compton Bassett Neighbourhood Plan are:
1.
Maintain and improve assets of community value
2.
Maintain and improve local services for existing and new residents
3.
Improve traffic safety and transport services
4.
Sensitive development which protects and enriches the habitat and biodiversity of Compton Bassett
5.
Encourage re-cycling, minimisation of the carbon footprint and the increased use of renewable
energy within the Parish
6.
Minimise the environmental impact of climate change on water resources and flood risk where
possible
7.
Preserve the character of Compton Bassett, conservation area, historic buildings and historic rights of
way
8.
Strengthen and support local economic activity
9.
Delivery of a high quality housing growth strategy tailored to the needs and context of Compton
Bassett
10. Protection of rural landscape, AONB, visual amenity, local green space & air quality
11. Protection of land and soil resources
Page 4
Compton Bassett Strategic Environmental Assessment
The vision of the Plan is to make Compton Bassett:
“an even better place to be, now and for future generations”.
This report provides a Sustainability Assessment of the Compton Bassett Neighbourhood Plan to
provide evidence of sustainability and a framework for testing reasonable alternatives and future
development proposals within the designated area of the Plan.
Although it was initially thought that the scale of the development within a previously consented
development area was too small to cause any significant environmental impact, Compton Bassett
Parish Council wanted to include a Strategic Environmental Assessment as good practice due to the
central importance of the AONB and conservation area to the Compton Bassett Neighbourhood Plan.
In addition, Wiltshire Council’s screening opinion confirmed that a Strategic Environmental
Assessment would be required to ensure, inter alia, that the proposals presented in the Compton
Bassett Neighbourhood Development Plan contribute towards the achievement of sustainable
development.
This report provides a scoping report for consideration by the statutory consultation bodies: Natural
England, English Heritage and the Environment Agency for a Strategic Environmental Assessment in
the form of a Sustainability Assessment of the Compton Bassett Neighbourhood Development Plan
incorporating the legal requirements of the EU Strategic Environmental Assessment of Plans and
Programmes (The Strategic Environmental Assessment (SEA) Directive) which both supports the
Compton Bassett Neighbourhood Development Plan and provides a framework for testing future
development proposals within the designated area of the plan. The designated area for the Compton
Bassett Neighbourhood Plan is:
Page 5
Compton Bassett Strategic Environmental Assessment
The Compton Bassett Neighbourhood Plan was instigated by Compton Bassett Parish Council in 2013
and a Steering Group (SG) was set up to take the process forwards. The timetable for the production
of the Compton Bassett Neighbourhood Plan, the Sustainability Appraisal and Design Statement is
shown below:
Date
25/7/13
Action
Compton Bassett Parish Council
(CBPC) meeting gives permission for
production of Compton Bassett
Neighbourhood Plan (CBNP) and
appoints Steering Group (SG) leaders
People Involved
CBPC
SG Leaders
Cllr. D. Coward
(CBPC Vice Chair)
Cllr. P. Alberry
29/8/13
First SG meeting
SG Leaders &
some 20 Villagers
to discuss draft
questionnaire
30/8/13
Draft Questionnaire produced
Cllr. P. Alberry
19/10/13
Second SG meeting to refine SG leaders with
questionnaire and agree final version input from some
20 Villagers
21/11/2013 Progress report to CBPC
CBPC
22/11/2013 Questionnaire delivered to all CBPC
dwellings by hand in Compton Bassett
with additional electronic mailings to
those with internet and public display
in Village Hall and White Horse
14/12/2013 Public Meeting in Benson Village Hall Circa 50 Villagers
to discuss Questionnaire results
& CBPC
23/1/14
27/2/14
5/3/14
13/3/14
17/3/14
20/3/14
23/5/14
28/5/14
29/5/14
25/6/14
26/6/14
June-July
CBPC progress report & discussion
CBPC
First Draft CBNP) sent to Wiltshire SG
Council (WC)
WC Comments
WC & SG
SG meeting
Re-draft of CBNP with WC comments
CBPC progress report & discussion
Re-draft agreed including WC Core
Strategy & Core Policies & resubmitted to WC
CBPC progress report & discussion
Further WC comments
Agree CBNP re-draft & summary
presentation for public meeting
Presentation of CBNP to Benson
Village Hall Committee (BVHC)
CBNP available to all Villagers (e-mail,
public copies in BVHC & White Horse;
further copies available from Chair
SG
SG
CBPC
SG
CBPC
WG
SG
Problems
Availability of core data
A divergence of views had
to be accommodated
within the questionnaire
As above
Co-ordination
deliveries
of
hand
Valid comments which
required some CBNP
modifications
Need to relate CBNP to
Wilts Core Strategy &
Policies
Availability of data
Copyright issues
Cllr. P. Alberry &
BVHC
Page 6
17/7/14
Compton Bassett Strategic Environmental Assessment
24/7/14
30/7/14
7/8/14
16/9/14
18/9/14
25/9/14
26/9/14
6/10/14
9/10/14
10/10/14
13/10/14
29/10/14
31/10/14
27/11/14
2/12/14
CBPC)
CBPC progress report & discussion
CBPC
CBNP Area designation
issue & need for
Screening opinion on
Sustainability Assessment
(SA)
Public Meeting in Benson Village Hall Circa 50 Villagers A divergence of views to
to discuss CBNP
& CBPC
be accommodated in the
CBNP – e.g. provision for
old people; development
outside the conservation
area; development inside
the conservation area but
outside the designated
development area
Re-draft CBNP in light of public
discussion
Draft CBNP submitted to WC for SG
comment
WC indicate that a scoping opinion is WC
CBPC did not request a
required to determine whether a
scoping
opinion
but
Strategic Environmental Assessment
opted to carry out a SA
(SEA) is required
CBPC discussion of SA requirement
CBPC
SG agree to include SA as good SG
practice
Obtained environmental information Cllr. P. Alberry
A
diverse
set
of
from the major landowners and
information
to
be
related to the various “magic maps”
collated and evidenced
Feedback to local landowners to Cllr. P. Alberry
check for accuracy
SG and CBPC discussions with CBPC & SG
agreement of date for public
consultation
SA produced & CBNP re-drafted for Cllr. P. Alberry
consistency
Preparation of CB design statement
Cllr. P. Alberry
Public Meeting in Benson Village Hall Circa 50 Villagers A divergence of views to
to discuss CBNP, SA and design & CBPC
be accommodated in the
statement (DS)
CBNP & SA
Referendum on acceptability of All
Compton
CBNP, SA and design statement (DS)
Bassett Villagers
Final CBNP, SA & DS received by CBPC
Compton Bassett Parish Council
together with details of the
referendum
Re-drafted CBNP, SA and DS SG
Unsure that WC have
submitted to WC
understood CBPC position
5-6 week delay for
consideration
by
Wiltshire Council Officers
Page 7
2/12/14
Compton Bassett Strategic Environmental Assessment
3/12/14
4/12/14
8/12/14
9/12/14
22/12/14
22/12/14
To
20/1/15
6/1/15
12/1/15
20/1/115
29/1/15
30/1/15
Meeting with Mr. D. King (Wiltshire Cllr. P. Szczesiak & Mr King advised that
Council)
Cllr. P. Alberry
further documents would
be required: Scoping
Report; Basic Conditions
Statement; Consultation
Statement
Draft
Consultation
Statement Cllr. P. Alberry
submitted
Draft Basic Conditions Statement & Cllr. P. Alberry
CBNP objectives submitted
Comments from Wiltshire Council on WC
Draft Scoping Report
Draft Scoping report submitted to Cllr. P. Alberry
English Heritage; Natural England &
Environment Agency
Comments received from English
Comments used to revise
Heritage and Natural England
the
Scoping
Report,
Sustainability Assessment
and Neighbourhood Plan
Revisions
to
Scoping
Report, Cllr. P. Alberry
Revisions
include
Sustainability
assessment
and
comments from Statutory
Consultees and Wiltshire
Compton Bassett Neighbourhood
Plan
Council
Revised
Neighbourhood
Plan Cllr. P. Alberry
circulated to local Parish Councils for
comment
Revised Sustainability Assessment Cllr. P. Alberry
submitted to North Wessex Downs
for comments
Comments
received
from Cllr. P. Alberry
There were no comments
Environment Agency
from the Environment
Agency so no further
revisions were required
Comments from PCs
Comments from NW AONB
Final revised version of Compton CBPC
Bassett Neighbourhood Plan and
Sustainability Assessment considered
and approved by Compton Bassett
Parish Council
Final revised version of Compton CBPC
Bassett Neighbourhood Plan and
Sustainability Assessment submitted
to Wiltshire Council for public
consultation and formal approval
Public Consultation
Revised CBNP, SA & SC formally
submitted to Planning Inspector
Formal
approval
by
Planning
Inspector
Page 8
Compton Bassett Strategic Environmental Assessment
The following sections cover the policy context (Schedule 2(a) and (e) of the Environmental
Assessment of Plans and Programmes Regulations 2004; a description of the environmental context
(Schedule 2(b), 2(c) & 2(d)); a consideration of various alternatives (Schedule 2(h)) and the proposed
next steps.
Page 9
Compton Bassett Strategic Environmental Assessment
Chapter 2. Sustainability Assessment Methodology
The following sections contain a brief summary of the key stages that will be completed during the
preparation of the Compton Bassett Neighbourhood Development Plan, following the SEA Directive
and national guidance (“Sustainability Appraisal of Regional Spatial Strategies and Local
Government plan documents 2005” and “A Practical Guide to the Strategic Environmental
Assessment Directive, 2005”).
There are five stages in the sustainability appraisal process:
• Stage A – Setting the context and objectives, establishing the baseline and deciding on
the scope
• Stage B – Developing and refining plan options
• Stage C – Appraising the effects of the plan
• Stage D – Consulting on the draft Compton Bassett Neighbourhood Development Plan
and the Sustainability Assessment
• Stage E – Monitoring and implementation of the plan
Full compliance with each of the stages is demonstrated in Appendix 1.
Stage A – Scoping to meet the requirements of the SEA Directive
Stage A1 – The identification of national, regional and local plans, programmes, policies
and sustainability objectives that will impact on the emerging Compton Bassett
Neighbourhood Development Plan;
• Stage A2 – The collection of baseline information to provide a picture of past, present
and likely future conditions within the area. Key sources of information include
census data; population forecasts; commissioned studies and local public
consultation, developing key indicators to monitor the effects and performance of
the Compton Bassett Neighbourhood Development Plan;
• Stage A3 – Identification of sustainability issues and problems affecting the area, which
can be addressed through the development of policies and proposals within the
Compton Bassett Neighbourhood Development Plan;
• Stage A4 – Development of a sustainability appraisal framework to assess the impacts
of the emerging Plan’s objectives, policies and proposals; and
• Stage A5 – Consultation on the appropriateness and robustness of the scope of the
Sustainability Assessment and the proposed assessment framework.
Page 10
Compton Bassett Strategic Environmental Assessment
Stage A1 – Review of Relevant Policies, Plans and Programmes
The SEA Directive requires that the environmental report should include “an outline of the contents,
main objectives of the plan or programme and relationship with other relevant plans and
programmes” and that the environmental report should also include “the environmental protection
objectives, established at international, Community or Member State level which are relevant to
the plan or programme”.
European Directive 92/43/EEC relating to the conservation of Natural Habitats and of Wild Fauna and
Flora (the Habitats Directive) requires a Habitats Regulation Assessment (HRA) to be undertaken
conforming to the UK Habitats Directive via the Conservation and Species Regulations 2010. The
HRA assesses any impact against the conservation objectives of sites of European importance for
nature conservation to determine any likely adverse effects. Details of the HRA screening
assessment for the Compton Bassett Neighbourhood Plan are given in Appendix 2.
The CBNP sustainability assessment (which incorporates the requirements of the SEA Directive) has
been drawn up following a review of:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
20.
21.
22.
23.
24.
25.
26.
Town and Country Planning Act 1990
Town and Country Planning Regulations 2011
Good Practice in EIA Guidance: Institute of Environmental Management &
Assessment
A Practical Guide to the Strategic Environmental Assessment Directive 2005
National Policy Planning Framework 2012
Planning Policy Guidance 12, 1992
The Localism Act 2011
Neighbourhood Planning (General) Regulations 2012
Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981
Conservation (Natural Habitats) Regulations 1994
Hedgerows Regulations 1997
Countryside and Rights of Way Act 2000
Dorset Ecology Report DEC/1744 2009
UK census 2011
Wiltshire Core Strategy 2016
Wiltshire & Swindon Waste Core Strategy 2006-2026
Calne Community Area Plan 2004-2014
North Wessex Downs AONB Management Plan 2009-2014
Wiltshire Local Transport Plan 2006-7
Wiltshire and Swindon Economic Strategy 2003-2008
Wiltshire Biodiversity Action Plan 2008
Sustainability Appraisal Report, Focussed Consultation Document, 2012
Air Quality Strategy for Wiltshire 2011-2015
Wiltshire Carbon Management Plan 2013-2017
English Heritage “Heritage at Risk Register 2013”
Wiltshire Core Strategy – Assessment under the Habitats Regulations 2012
Page 11
Compton Bassett Strategic Environmental Assessment
The policy context is taken from the Wiltshire Core Strategy 2016 and the full policy details which
affect the CBNP are given in the CBNP and summarised below:
Core Strategies and Policies
National Policy Planning
Framework 2012
Achieving sustainable development
Supporting a prosperous rural
economy
Promoting sustainable transport
Supporting high quality
communications infrastructure
Delivering a wide choice of high
quality homes
Requiring good design
Key Points
CBNP Objective
Meeting the needs of the present
without compromising the ability of
future generations to meet their
own needs. A presumption in favour
of sustainable development where
development plans should meet the
objectively assessed development
needs of their area and where
development proposals that accord
with the development plan should
be approved without delay.
Planning policies should support
growth in rural areas in order to
create jobs and prosperity by taking
a positive approach to sustainable
new development.
Transport policies should facilitate
sustainable development and reduce
the need to travel to reduce
congestion
and
pollution.
Developments should demonstrate
safe and suitable access for all, with
appropriate parking provisions.
Advanced,
high
quality
communications infrastructure is
essential for sustainable economic
growth. Access to broad band plays
a vital role in enhancing the
provision of local community
facilities and services.
The
expansion
of
electronic
communications
networks,
telecommunications and broadband
should be supported.
The local plan should meet the
objectively assessed needs for
market and affordable housing in the
local area by identifying suitable
development sites for up to 15 years
where possible. Development plans
should include a mix of housing
based on community needs,
including affordable housing.
Local and neighbourhood plans
should
develop
robust
and
CBNP
SA
CBNP 8: Strengthen
and support local
economic activity
CBNP 2: Maintain
and improve local
services for existing
and new residents
CBNP 2: Maintain
and improve local
services for existing
and new residents
CBNP 9: Delivery of a
high quality housing
growth
strategy
tailored to the needs
and
context
of
Compton Bassett
Compton
Bassett
Design Statement
Page 12
Compton Bassett Strategic Environmental Assessment
comprehensive policies that set out
the quality of development that will CBNP 9: Delivery of a
be expected for the area based on high quality housing
the stated plan objectives.
growth
strategy
tailored to the needs
and
context
of
Compton Bassett
Promoting healthy communities
Protecting green belt land
Meeting the challenge of climate
change, flooding and coastal
change
Conserving and enhancing the
natural environment
Conserving and enhancing the
historic environment
Planning policies should be inclusive,
encouraging healthy community
interaction with safe, accessible
environments with appropriate
public space, green space and
community facilities to meet social,
recreational and cultural needs.
National green belt policies protect
unrestricted urban sprawl; prevent
neighbouring towns from merging;
safeguard the countryside from
encroachment; preserve special and
historic character; and assist in
urban regeneration by recycling
derelict land.
New developments should adopt
pro-active policies for a low carbon
future which will help to reduce
greenhouse emissions via energy
efficiency improvements to existing
and new buildings, including the use
of renewable energy.
New developments should protect
and enhance the natural and local
environment
with regard to
landscapes, geology, soil, water, air,
noise pollution and bio-diversity.
The use of brownfield land should be
encouraged where it is not of high
environmental value.
Particular
emphasis should be given to
protection of AONBs.
CBNP 10: Protection
of rural landscape,
AONB,
visual
amenity, local green
space & air quality
CBNP 2: Maintain
and improve local
services for existing
and new residents
CBNP 10: Protection
of rural landscape,
AONB,
visual
amenity, local green
space & air quality
CBNP 6: Minimise
the environmental
impact of climate
change and flood risk
where possible
CBNP 10: Protection
of rural landscape,
AONB,
visual
amenity, local green
space & air quality
CBNP 4: Sensitive
development which
protects and enriches
the habitat and
biodiversity of
Compton Bassett
CBNP 11: Protection
of land and soil
resources
Local plans should adopt a positive CBNP 7: Preserve the
strategy for the conservation of the character
of
Page 13
Compton Bassett Strategic Environmental Assessment
Facilitating the use of sustainable
materials
Wiltshire Core Strategy
historic environment and heritage
assets. New developments should
make a positive contribution to local
character
and
distinctiveness,
particularly in conservation areas.
Where proposed developments
might impact a heritage asset, great
weight should be given to the asset’s
conservation. Substantial harm to or
loss of a grade II listed building,
scheduled monuments and heritage
assets of archaeological interest
should be exceptional and for World
Heritage sites it should be wholly
exceptional.
Substitute
materials,
re-cycled
materials and/or minerals waste
should be used where possible in
preference to the extraction of
indigenous materials.
Compton
Bassett,
conservation area,
historic buildings and
historic rights of way
Creating the right environment to
deliver economic growth, delivering
the jobs Wiltshire’s population
needs locally, and taking a flexible
and responsive
approach to
employment land delivery
CBNP 2: Maintain
and improve local
services for existing
and new residents
CBNP 5: Encourage
re-cycling,
minimisation of the
carbon footprint and
the increased use of
renewable
energy
within the Parish
Providing for the most sustainable CBNP & SA
pattern of development that
minimises the need to travel and CBNP 1: Maintain
maximises the potential to use and improve assets
of community value
sustainable transport
Managing development to ensure
that jobs and the right infrastructure
are delivered at the right time to
ensure that out commuting, in
particular to areas outside of
Wiltshire, is not increased and
development does not have a
detrimental
impact
on
infrastructure.
Working
towards
lowering
Wiltshire’s carbon footprint through
the
appropriate
location
of
development,
and
through
renewable energy and sustainable
construction
CBNP3: Improve
traffic safety and
transport services
CBNP 4: Sensitive
development which
protects and enriches
the habitat and
biodiversity of
Compton Bassett
CBNP 5: Encourage
re-cycling,
minimisation of the
carbon footprint and
the increased use of
renewable
energy
within the Parish
Page 14
Compton Bassett Strategic Environmental Assessment
Protecting and planning for the
enhancement of the natural, historic
and built environments, wherever
possible, including maintaining,
enhancing and expanding Wiltshire’s
network of green infrastructure to
support the health and wellbeing of
communities
CBNP 6: Minimise
the environmental
impact of climate
change and flood risk
where possible
CBNP 7: Preserve the
character
of
Compton
Bassett,
Providing high quality, well designed conservation area,
development, and ensuring full local historic buildings and
community involvement in planning historic rights of way
for significant new proposals
CBNP 8: Strengthen
Providing the framework to deliver and support local
appropriate community-led planning economic activity
policy
documents,
Including
neighbourhood plans
CBNP 9: Delivery of a
high quality housing
growth
strategy
tailored to the needs
and
context
of
Compton Bassett
Core Policy 58
Ensuring the conservation of the
historic environment
Core Policy 48
Supporting Rural Life
CBNP 10: Protection
of rural landscape,
AONB,
visual
amenity, local green
space & air quality
CBNP 7: Preserve the
character
of
Compton
Bassett,
conservation area,
historic buildings and
historic rights of way
Wiltshire’s important monuments,
sites and landscapes and areas of
historic and built heritage
significance need to be protected
and enhanced in order that they
continue to make an important
contribution to Wiltshire’s
environment and quality of life
protecting the countryside and CBNP
maintaining its local distinctiveness
supporting the sensitive reuse of CBNP 1: Maintain
built assets to help meet local needs and improve assets
of community value
supporting
improved
access
CBNP 2: Maintain
between places and to services
and improve local
supporting the community in taking services for existing
and new residents
ownership of local services
CBNP3: Improve
traffic safety and
Page 15
Compton Bassett Strategic Environmental Assessment
transport services
Core Policy 49
Protection of rural services and
community facilities
Core Policy 51
Landscape
Core Policy 50
Biodiversity & Geodiversity
Core Policy 52
Green Infrastructure
Core Policy 55
Air Quality
Core Policy 57
Ensuring high quality design and
place shaping
Core Policy 60
Sustainable transport
CBNP 10: Protection
of rural landscape,
AONB,
visual
amenity, local green
space & air quality
CBNP3: Improve
traffic safety and
transport services
CBNP 10: Protection
of rural landscape,
AONB,
visual
amenity, local green
space & air quality
to protect and encourage the
development of rural services and
facilities in Wiltshire
development
should
protect,
conserve and where possible
enhance landscape character and
must not have an unacceptable
harmful impact upon landscape
character, while any negative
impacts must be mitigated as far as
possible through sensitive design CBNP 4: Sensitive
development which
and landscape measures.
protects and enriches
the habitat and
biodiversity of
Compton Bassett
development should avoid and CBNP 4: Sensitive
reduce disturbance to sensitive development which
wildlife species and habitats protects and enriches
throughout the lifetime of the the habitat and
biodiversity of
development
Compton Bassett
conserving and enhancing the
CBNP 10: Protection
natural environment; providing
of rural landscape,
wildlife corridors; reducing noise and AONB,
visual
air pollution; and helping
amenity, local green
communities adapt to changing
space & air quality
climate through water and carbon
management
to maintain good air quality and
CBNP 10: Protection
minimise air pollution
of rural landscape,
AONB,
visual
amenity, local green
space & air quality
a high standard of design is required CBNP 9: Delivery of a
in all new developments
high quality housing
growth
strategy
development is expected to create a tailored to the needs
strong sense of place through
and
context
of
drawing on the local context and
Compton Bassett
being complimentary to the locality
to help reduce the need to travel,
CBNP3: Improve
particularly by private car, and
traffic safety and
support and encourage the
transport services
sustainable, safe and efficient
Page 16
Compton Bassett Strategic Environmental Assessment
Core Policy 40
Hotels, bed and breakfasts, guest
houses and conference facilities
Core Policy 41
Sustainable construction and low
carbon energy
Core Policy 42
Standalone renewable energy
installations
Core Policy 43
Providing affordable homes
Core Policy 44
Rural exceptions sites
Core Policy 46
movement of people
and goods within and through
Wiltshire
Proposals for new hotels, bed and
breakfasts & guesthouses together
with the sensitive extension,
upgrading and intensification of
existing tourism accommodation
facilities will be supported where the
proposals are of an appropriate scale
and character within the context of
the immediate surroundings and the
settlement as a whole
Sustainable construction and lowcarbon energy will be integral to all
new development in Wiltshire
Proposals for standalone renewable
energy schemes will be supported
subject to satisfactory resolution of
all site specific constraints including
landscape (particularly round
AONBs, biodiversity, historic
environment, residential amenity
and high quality agricultural land
provision of affordable housing may
vary on a site-by-site basis taking
into account evidence of
local need, mix of affordable housing
proposed and where appropriate,
the viability of the development
where it can be demonstrated that a
proposed development will meet a
local need that cannot be
accommodated in any other way,
the council may permit small scale
residential development (7 dwellings
or less) outside but adjoining the
development limits of Local Service
Centres and Large Villages, or
adjacent to the existing built area of
Small Villages
CBNP 8: Strengthen
and support local
economic activity
CBNP 5: Encourage
re-cycling,
minimisation of the
carbon footprint and
the increased use of
renewable
energy
within the Parish
CBNP 5: Encourage
re-cycling,
minimisation of the
carbon footprint and
the increased use of
renewable
energy
within the Parish
CBNP 9: Delivery of a
high quality housing
growth
strategy
tailored to the needs
and
context
of
Compton Bassett
CBNP
CBNP 9: Delivery of a
high quality housing
growth
strategy
tailored to the needs
and
context
of
Compton Bassett
the proposal must have clear
support from the local community
and must consist of 7 dwellings or
fewer
the provision, in suitable locations, CBNP 9: Delivery of a
Page 17
Compton Bassett Strategic Environmental Assessment
Meeting the needs of Wiltshire’s
vulnerable and older people
Calne Area Strategy
North Wessex Downs AONB
Management Plan 2009-2014
Wiltshire Local Transport Plan
2006-7
Wiltshire and Swindon Economic
Strategy 2003-2008
Wiltshire Bio-diversity Action Plan
2008
Sustainability Appraisal Report,
Focussed Consultation Document,
September 2012
of new housing to meet the specific high quality housing
needs of vulnerable and older growth
strategy
people will be required
tailored to the needs
and
context
of
wherever
practicable, Compton Bassett
accommodation should seek to
deliver and promote independent
living
Over the plan period (2006 to 2026), CBNP 9: Delivery of a
at least 1,380 new homes will be
high quality housing
growth
strategy
provided, of which 1,240 should
occur at Calne and 140 homes will be tailored to the needs
provided in the rest of the
and
context
of
community area
Compton Bassett
The AONB management plan
CBNP 10: Protection
addresses the need to conserve and of rural landscape,
enhance the landscape, heritage and AONB,
visual
biodiversity within the AONB
amenity, local green
space & air quality
The local transport plan aims to
CBNP3: Improve
improve access for goods and
traffic safety and
services, especially in rural areas to:
transport services
reduce speeding; respond to an
increasing number of vehicles;
improve road safety; maintain an
integrated public transport network;
provide a satisfactory bus network,
especially in rural areas; improve
facilities for cyclists and pedestrians
The strategy aims to:
CBNP 8: Strengthen
encourage sustainable development and support local
by increasing investment in
economic activity
employment and services; develop a
skilled and adaptable workforce;
ensure sustainable economic growth
Wiltshire contains a great diversity
CBNP 4: Sensitive
of habitat types including chalk
development which
grassland, chalk rivers, lowland
protects and enriches
grassland, areas of open water,
the habitat
and
woods and forests which support a
biodiversity
of
rich biodiversity which enhances the Compton Bassett
quality of life and provides essential
services to the wider eco-system.
CBNP 10: Protection
of rural landscape,
The Habitat and Species action plans AONB,
visual
provide clear objectives, targets and amenity, local green
actions to monitor and improve eco- space & air quality
systems in Wiltshire.
Wiltshire’s sustainability report for
CBNP 9: Delivery of a
the Calne area identifies a housing
high quality housing
strategy which will deliver housing
growth
strategy
Page 18
Compton Bassett Strategic Environmental Assessment
growth to meet the local need and
underpin economic growth in Calne.
The report identifies a lack of
brownfield sites and highlights the
adverse effects of greenfield
development which will need to be
mitigated by making effective use of
the available land and preserving the
AONB.
tailored to the needs
and
context
of
Compton Bassett
A level of transport growth is
envisaged which will increase traffic
volumes and cause a reduction in air
quality.
Air Quality Strategy for Wiltshire
2011-2015
Wiltshire Carbon Management Plan
2013-2017
English Heritage at Risk Register
2013
The impact of any future
development on the strategic road
network must be considered
together with the impact of the
waste facilities at the edge of Calne
which are a major source of heavy
goods vehicle (HGV) through traffic
which have a significant negative
impact on Calne.
Wiltshire’s policy is to seek to
maintain good air quality and to
strive to deliver improvements in
areas where air quality fails national
objectives in order to protect public
health and the environment.
Air quality across Wiltshire is
generally good but there a number
of air quality blackspots, one of
which is in the Calne area where air
quality significantly exceeds EU air
quality limits and Calne was
designated an Air Quality
Management Area in 2013.
The Wiltshire carbon management
plan aims to reduce Wiltshire’s
carbon footprint from 60,436 tonnes
of CO2 in 2012/13 to 11,823 tonnes
of CO2 by 2016/17 by rationalising
office buildings and reducing energy
wastage.
The Compton Bassett designated
area is within 5 miles of Avebury and
20 miles of Stonehenge which are
both designated World Heritage
CBNP 10: Protection
of rural landscape,
AONB,
visual
amenity, local green
space & air quality
CBNP 5: Encourage
re-cycling,
minimisation of the
carbon footprint and
the increased use of
renewable
energy
within the Parish
CBNP
There are no heritage
assets at risk with
Page 19
Compton Bassett Strategic Environmental Assessment
sites.
North Wiltshire Local Plan 2006
Sustainability Core Policy
The closest heritage assets at risk are
the former aircraft hangars at
Yatesbury Airfield, Cherhill which
were built in 1917 as part of a
training centre and are Grade II
listed buildings. One hangar has
been repaired and consent has been
granted to demolish the second
hangar.
Development proposals will be
examined against the following
criteria:
Long term economic health of the
local economy
Social inclusion and access to
community infrastructure
Quality of the natural and historic
environment
Use of natural resources and
appropriate recycling, renewable
energy and energy conservation
Community Infrastructure Core
Policy
Development proposals will be
examined against the following
criteria:
Affordable housing
Education, skill training provision
and libraries
Travel and support infrastructure
Community buildings and facilities
the Compton Bassett
designated plan area.
CBNP
CBNP 8: Strengthen
and support local
economic activity
CBNP 1: Maintain
and improve assets
of community value
CBNP 2: Maintain
and improve local
services for existing
and new residents
CBNP 7: Preserve the
character
of
Compton
Bassett,
conservation area,
historic buildings and
historic rights of way
CBNP 5: Encourage
re-cycling,
minimisation of the
carbon footprint and
the increased use of
renewable
energy
within the Parish
CBNP
Compton Bassett
Design Statement
CBNP 9: Delivery of a
high quality housing
growth
strategy
tailored to the needs
and
context
of
Compton Bassett
Page 20
Compton Bassett Strategic Environmental Assessment
Health care provision and social
services
New or improved public open spaces
Leisure, sport and recreation
provision
Waste management and recycling
Environmental protection and
enhancement
Information communication
technology infrastructure
Art in the community
Development Control Core Policy
Development proposals will be
permitted subject to the following
criteria:
Respect for the local character and
distinctiveness of the area with
regard to the design, size, scale,
density, massing, materials, siting
and layout
Respect for the quality of the natural
and built environment, including the
historic environment, archaeology
and ecology
Avoid unacceptable loss of privacy
and amenities to adjacent dwellings
Safe, convenient access for
pedestrians, cyclists and disabled
people with minimal crime risk
Promote the use of renewable
energy and local natural/recycled
materials
Efficient water supply use and
disposal
Storage, collection & recycling of
CBNP 2: Maintain
and improve local
services for existing
and new residents
CBNP3: Improve
traffic safety and
transport services
CBNP 10: Protection
of rural landscape,
AONB,
visual
amenity, local green
space & air quality
CBNP 5: Encourage
re-cycling,
minimisation of the
carbon footprint and
the increased use of
renewable
energy
within the Parish
CBNP
Compton Bassett
Design Statement
CBNP 7: Preserve the
character
of
Compton
Bassett,
conservation area,
historic buildings and
historic rights of way
CBNP 9: Delivery of a
high quality housing
growth
strategy
tailored to the needs
and
context
of
Compton Bassett
CBNP3: Improve
traffic safety and
transport services
CBNP 5: Encourage
re-cycling,
minimisation of the
carbon footprint and
the increased use of
Page 21
Compton Bassett Strategic Environmental Assessment
refuse
Promote travel reduction, public
transport, cycling & walking
Site access, car parking and cycle
storage
Avoid overload of existing services &
facilities
Business Development Core Policy
Areas of Outstanding Natural
Beauty
Protection of Species
Avoid environment pollution and
environmental health issues from
noise, light intrusion, smoke, fumes,
effluent, vibration, waste or litter
New business development will be
encouraged where it: promotes a
diverse and robust economy and
reduces out-commuting; is of a scale
which will maintain & improve local
services; promotes the re-use of
rural buildings in keeping with the
surroundings with potential to
sustain the local rural economy
Priority will be given to the
conservation and enhancement of
the natural beauty of the landscape.
Development will be restricted to
change of use of existing buildings
appropriate to the economic and
social well-being of the area and
which benefits the understanding &
enjoyment of local amenities
provided the proposal
conserves/enhances the natural
beauty including the open rural
character, riverside/water features,
wildlife sites, trees and/or
woodland; is sited so as to minimise
any impact and uses appropriate
materials & landscaping
Planning permission will not be
granted for development which will
have an adverse effect on badgers or
species protected by Schedules 1, 5
or 8 of the Wildlife & Countryside
Act 1981 as amended by section 74
of the Countryside and Rights of Way
Act 2000 or Schedule 2 of the
Conservation (Natural Habitats)
Regulations (1994) and Protection of
renewable
energy
within the Parish
CBNP 2: Maintain
and improve local
services for existing
and new residents
CBNP 6: Minimise
the environmental
impact of climate
change and flood risk
where possible
CBNP 8: Strengthen
and support local
economic activity
CBNP 10: Protection
of rural landscape,
AONB,
visual
amenity, local green
space & air quality
CBNP 4: Sensitive
development which
protects and enriches
the habitat and
biodiversity of
Compton Bassett
Page 22
Compton Bassett Strategic Environmental Assessment
Managing Nature Conservation
Features
Conserving Biodiversity
Woodland
Trees, Site Features & the Control
of New Development
Landscape Character of the
Countryside
Renewable Energy
Badgers Act 2000.
Development which may adversely
affect landscape features which are
important to flora & fauna will only
be permitted if the reasons for
development outweigh the need to
retain the features and there are
appropriate mitigation measures.
Development proposals which may
adversely affect biodiversity will only
be permitted where there are
appropriate mitigation measures.
Creation, conservation & positive
management of woodlands,
particularly areas of ancient and
semi-natural woodland will be
encouraged.
Development permission will not be
granted where loss of trees, hedges,
lakes/ponds or other important
landscape & ecological features
where the features could be
incorporated into the development
design
The landscape of North Wiltshire
and its socially distinctive
characteristics shall be conserved
and enhanced. Development will be
permitted where it does not
adversely affect the character of an
area and features that contribute to
local distinctiveness.
Renewable energy projects will be
permitted provided such
development would not cause harm
to a designated historic area or
natural landscape.
CBNP 4: Sensitive
development which
protects and enriches
the habitat and
biodiversity of
Compton Bassett
CBNP 4: Sensitive
development which
protects and enriches
the habitat and
biodiversity of
Compton Bassett
CBNP 4: Sensitive
development which
protects and enriches
the habitat and
biodiversity of
Compton Bassett
CBNP 4: Sensitive
development which
protects and enriches
the habitat and
biodiversity of
Compton Bassett
CBNP 10: Protection
of rural landscape,
AONB,
visual
amenity, local green
space & air quality
CBNP 10: Protection
of rural landscape,
AONB,
visual
amenity, local green
space & air quality
CBNP 7: Preserve the
character
of
Compton
Bassett,
conservation area,
historic buildings and
historic rights of way
CBNP 5: Encourage
re-cycling,
minimisation of the
carbon footprint and
the increased use of
renewable
energy
within the Parish
Page 23
Compton Bassett Strategic Environmental Assessment
Noise & Pollution
Development will only be permitted
where it would not generate, or
itself be subject to, harm upon
public health or cause pollution to
the environment by the emission of
excessive noise, light, intrusion,
smoke, fumes, other forms of air
pollution, heat, radiation, effluent or
vibration.
Development in Conservation Areas Proposals for development in
conservation areas will only be
permitted where the proposal will
preserve or enhance the character
or appearance of the area. Open
spaces, village greens, gaps between
buildings, fields, gardens and trees
that provide attractive views and
vistas to, from and within public
areas will be protected from
development that would fail to
preserve or enhance the character
or appearance of a conservation
area. In addition, the established
historic streets, building lines and
frontages, burgage plots and
boundaries, the plan form of
buildings, and other historic physical
and landscape features will be
conserved and incorporated into the
proposal where appropriate.
Demolition in Conservation Areas
Development, Demolition or
Alteration involving Listed Buildings
Scheduled Ancient Monuments and
Nationally Important Features
Developments which require
demolition of buildings or structures
which make a positive contribution
to the character or appearance of a
conservation area will not be
permitted.
Development or alteration affecting
a listed building will only be
permitted where it preserves or
enhances the building, its setting
and any features of special
architectural or historic interest.
Development will not be permitted
where a proposal would have an
adverse effect on a scheduled
CBNP 10: Protection
of rural landscape,
AONB,
visual
amenity, local green
space & air quality
CBNP 7: Preserve the
character
of
Compton
Bassett,
conservation area,
historic buildings and
historic rights of way
CBNP
Compton
Bassett
Design Statement
CBNP 9: Delivery of a
high quality housing
growth
strategy
tailored to the needs
and
context
of
Compton Bassett
CBNP 10: Protection
of rural landscape,
AONB,
visual
amenity, local green
space & air quality
CBNP 7: Preserve the
character
of
Compton
Bassett,
conservation area,
historic buildings and
historic rights of way
CBNP 7: Preserve the
character
of
Compton
Bassett,
conservation area,
historic buildings and
historic rights of way
CBNP 7: Preserve the
character
of
Compton
Bassett,
conservation area,
historic buildings and
historic rights of way
CBNP 7: Preserve the
character
of
Compton
Bassett,
Page 24
Compton Bassett Strategic Environmental Assessment
Locally Important Archaeological
Sites
Enabling Development – Historic
Environment
Minimising the Need to Travel
Parking
monument or other nationally
important feature or archaeological
or historic interest or their setting.
There will be a presumption in
favour of the physical preservation in
situ of nationally important
archaeological remains and their
settings, whether the site is
scheduled or not.
Development in defined areas of
special archaeological significance,
or in other locally important
archaeological sites will only be
permitted where any archaeological
remains would be unaffected by the
proposals or satisfactory measures
are taken to ensure the physical
preservation of any remains in-situ
or where the need for and benefits
of the development outweigh
archaeological loss providing the key
features are excavated and
recorded.
Proposals enabling development will
only be permitted in exceptional
circumstances where the scale does
not exceed what is necessary to
support the enabling development
and where the actual development is
in the national interest.
New development should be
designed and located to minimise
the need to travel whilst being
accessible by cycling, walking and
public transport. Housing
developments should be accessible
to jobs, education, health facilities,
shopping, leisure and local services.
Proposals will be permitted where
they meet these sustainable
transport requirements.
conservation area,
historic buildings and
historic rights of way
Parking applications are required to
provide levels of car, cycle and
disabled parking in accordance with
the Countryside Standards set by the
Compton
Bassett
Design Statement
CBNP 7: Preserve the
character
of
Compton
Bassett,
conservation area,
historic buildings and
historic rights of way
CBNP 7: Preserve the
character
of
Compton
Bassett,
conservation area,
historic buildings and
historic rights of way
CBNP 2: Maintain
and improve local
services for existing
and new residents
CBNP3: Improve
traffic safety and
transport services
CBNP 5: Encourage
re-cycling,
minimisation of the
carbon footprint and
the increased use of
renewable
energy
within the Parish
CBNP 9: Delivery of a
Page 25
Compton Bassett Strategic Environmental Assessment
Highway Authority.
Cycling, Walking & Public Transport
Safeguarding
Residential Development Within
Framework Boundaries
Residential Development in the
Open Countryside
Affordable Housing in Rural Areas
Planning applications are expected
to make appropriate provision and
give priority access for cyclists,
pedestrians and public transport
users. Measures must improve road
safety, enhance the environment
and assist the access and movement
of persons with a disability or
impairment.
Development affecting public rights
of way, cycle and pedestrian routes
will only be permitted where
satisfactory provision, in terms of
safety, attractiveness and
convenience, is made to retain or
divert the existing or proposed
route.
Proposals for residential
development within the Framework
boundaries will be permitted
providing that priority is given to the
re-use of previously developed land
and buildings and the proposal is for
small scale or limited development
and the most efficient use of the
land is achieved (a minimum density
of 20 dwellings per hectare)
compatible with the site’s location,
its accessibility and its surroundings.
New dwellings in the countryside
outside the Framework boundaries
will be permitted for the essential
needs of agriculture, forestry or rural
based enterprises or for replacement
of existing dwellings where the
residential used has not been
abandoned; the existing dwelling is
incapable of retention as is or is
unsightly or out of character with its
surroundings; the replacement
dwelling is of a similar size and scale.
The Council will seek to negotiate an
element of affordable housing to
meet local needs on all housing
developments within the Framework
boundaries subject to the following
high quality housing
growth
strategy
tailored to the needs
and
context
of
Compton Bassett
CBNP 2: Maintain
and improve local
services for existing
and new residents
CBNP3: Improve
traffic safety and
transport services
CBNP 7: Preserve the
character
of
Compton
Bassett,
conservation area,
historic buildings and
historic rights of way
CBNP 9: Delivery of a
high quality housing
growth
strategy
tailored to the needs
and
context
of
Compton Bassett
Compton Bassett
Design Statement
Compton
Bassett
Design Statement
CBNP 10: Protection
of rural landscape,
AONB,
visual
amenity, local green
space & air quality
Compton
Bassett
Design Statement
CBNP 9: Delivery of a
high quality housing
Page 26
Compton Bassett Strategic Environmental Assessment
Affordable Housing on Rural
Exception Sites
Residential Extensions
criteria: The Council will negotiate
on the basis that about 50% of the
dwellings permitted will be
subsidised housing with an
additional proportion of low cost
housing subject to local need and
site characteristics and that
affordable housing should be
provided on site, dispersed
throughout the development or in
any event in clusters of nor more
than 15 dwellings so as to contribute
toward mixed and inclusive
communities.
As an exception to normal planning
policies small affordable housing
developments will be permitted
within and adjoining the villages in
the District provided that: there is
demonstrable local need for
affordable housing which cannot
otherwise be met and that the
scheme must be capable of
implementation and proper
management to ensure that the
benefits of the provision of
affordable housing to meet local
needs will be held in perpetuity.
growth
strategy
tailored to the needs
and
context
of
Compton Bassett
Household extensions and
development within a residential
curtilage will be permitted provided
that: it is in keeping with the host
building (other than in the case of
historic buildings where a change of
style might be desirable to indicate
the evolution of the building; it does
not result in un-neighbourly
development which would result in
loss of sight, overshadowing, loss of
privacy, oppression or other harm to
amenities of occupiers of either
adjacent private dwellings or the
property itself; it maintains the scale
and siting of the dwelling in relation
to adjoining development, open
spaces and the character of the area
and the wider landscape and it does
not result in the loss of or have a
potentially adverse impact on
protected trees, hedgerows or other
important landscape features.
Compton
Bassett
Design Statement
Compton
Bassett
Design Statement
CBNP 9: Delivery of a
high quality housing
growth
strategy
tailored to the needs
and
context
of
Compton Bassett
CBNP 9: Delivery of a
high quality housing
growth
strategy
tailored to the needs
and
context
of
Compton Bassett
Page 27
Compton Bassett Strategic Environmental Assessment
Business Development on
Unallocated Sites
Business Development Within, or
on the Edge of Villages
Rural Business Development
Re-use of Rural Buildings
Proposals to provide business
development within the framework
boundary of Calne will permitted
subject to the proposed use being of
an appropriate size and form for the
location and accessibility by a range
of transport routes.
Compton
Bassett
Design Statement
Development proposals to provide
new small scale or expanded
business uses will be permitted
within or adjoining villages with
framework boundaries provided that
the development is appropriate with
regard to the settlement and will not
have an adverse impact on the
surrounding road network.
Development proposals for business
uses in the countryside will be
permitted where they involve the reuse of existing rural buildings
suitable for conversion, where the
architectural and historical interest
of the original building is not
compromised or it involves limited
new building located well within (or
well related to) an existing group of
buildings and is sympathetic to local
building styles and surroundings or it
involves the limited expansion or
replacement of existing premises
where this would be more
acceptable and sustainable than
conversion and, in all cases, the
proposal does not lead to the
dispersal of business uses which
would be detrimental to town and
village vitality and economic viability
and that due consideration be given
to the impact on the local road
network.
Re-use of buildings in the
countryside will permitted, provided
that the proposed use: will be
contained within the building (no
extensive alterations); respects the
character, setting and local building
styles; consideration is given to
employment/community/residential
Compton
Bassett
Design Statement
CBNP 9: Delivery of a
high quality housing
growth
strategy
tailored to the needs
and
context
of
Compton Bassett
CBNP 8: Strengthen
and support local
economic activity
Compton
Bassett
Design Statement
CBNP 8: Strengthen
and support local
economic activity
Compton
Bassett
Design Statement
CBNP 8: Strengthen
and support local
economic activity
Page 28
Compton Bassett Strategic Environmental Assessment
Farm Diversification
Signs & Advertisements
Leisure Facilities & Open Space
Provision of Open Space
uses; there is no abuse of the
concession in relation to permitted
development rights and there is no
adverse impact on the local road
network.
Proposals for farm diversification will
be permitted where the proposal:
will not materially prejudice the
agricultural operations of the farm;
the scale is appropriate to the rural
context; does not adversely affect
the character of the environment,
local amenities and the local road
network.
Permission will be granted for signs
and advertisements provide that
they: do not prejudice public safety;
are suitable in size, siting and design
and do not affect the visual amenity.
Proposals for leisure facilities and
open space within or adjoining the
Framework Boundaries of towns and
villages will be permitted and
proposals for the redevelopment,
replacement or improvement of
existing leisure facilities or open
spaces will be permitted provided
that: the replacement/improved
facilities are equivalent (no
reduction); loss of facilities or open
space would not result in a
deficiency; the proposal is for
outdoor/indoor leisure facilities
which outweigh any loss of amenity
and proposals will improve facilities
ancillary to its use.
Proposals for new housing
development will be required to
make provision for open space on
site, to provide 15m2 for local parks
and 3m2 for play areas per person
although financial payments from
developers may be allowed for the
provision of alternative open space
Compton
Bassett
Design Statement
CBNP 8: Strengthen
and support local
economic activity
CBNP 10: Protection
of rural landscape,
AONB,
visual
amenity, local green
space & air quality
Compton
Bassett
Design Statement
CBNP 7: Preserve the
character
of
Compton
Bassett,
conservation area,
historic buildings and
historic rights of way
CBNP 1: Maintain
and improve assets
of community value
CBNP 10: Protection
of rural landscape,
AONB,
visual
amenity, local green
space & air quality
Compton
Bassett
Design Statement
CBNP 9: Delivery of a
high quality housing
growth
strategy
tailored to the needs
and
context
of
Page 29
Compton Bassett Strategic Environmental Assessment
and towards the upgrading of
existing local open spaces.
Development will be required to
make contributions to remedy local
space deficiencies and/or
maintenance.
Compton Bassett
CBNP 10: Protection
of rural landscape,
AONB,
visual
amenity, local green
space & air quality
Page 30
Compton Bassett Strategic Environmental Assessment
Step A2 – Review of Baseline Information
This chapter sets out the environmental context using a series of historical, environmental and socioeconomic data which has been collected using the “magic-map” method, public domain information,
landowner environmental information, village questionnaires and local knowledge. This information
formed an evidential basis for the sustainability assessment scoping report which was submitted to
Natural England, English Heritage, the Environment Agency and North Wessex Downs AONB for
comment. The comments have been used to revise the scoping report and have been incorporated
into this Sustainability Assessment and the Compton Bassett Neighbourhood Plan.
Heritage
Compton Bassett is a very old settlement which is listed in the Domesday Book. The suffix Bassett is
believed to have been taken from Lord Fulke Bassett who came over with William the Conqueror and
who was the overlord of Compton Bassett, Royal Wootton Bassett, Winterbourne Bassett and Hinton
Bassett.
In 1341, the parish consisted of a main part (Compton Bassett) and a detached part named Cowage
to the north-west which was transferred to Hilmarton in 1883 reducing the parish to 1042 hectares.
Compton Bassett Parish contains a number of archaeological features associated with the Late
Medieval period or earlier agricultural activity, including a field system which survives as a “below
ground” feature and the remains of two Saxon water mills, which are scheduled monuments in the
area of national significance in what is the wooded valley known as Abberd Brook, as shown on the
map below.
The modern boundary of Compton Bassett Parish is defined in the north-east where it follows the
contours of a steep escarpment for 500 m., and in the west and north-east it follows various ancient
streams, roads and tracks.
Compton Bassett is a small village of some 97 properties with a well-defined, close knit Community
of around 220 people. Compton Bassett has a distinctive village architecture of chalk walled houses,
stone-mullioned windows, dormer windows, brick quoins, gabled roofs and covered entrance
porches, as shown below.
Compton Bassett also has a Grade I listed building, St Swithin’s Church dating from the 12th century
together with a number of Grade 2 listed buildings, examples of which are shown below.
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Compton Bassett Strategic Environmental Assessment
The particular geography, heritage, architecture and scale of Compton Bassett combine to make it a
distinctive and separate entity from the adjoining Parishes of Cherhill, Hilmarton and Calne.
The designated Compton Bassett Neighbourhood Plan area contains a Grade I listed building (St
Swithin’s Church – red star); a public house (The White Horse Inn – purple star); a number of grade II
listed buildings and monuments (blue stars) together with a scheduled monument (Saxon Mill –
green star) and evidence of stone age settlement (brown star), as shown below.
Compton Bassett is close to two world heritage sites, Avebury (5 miles) and Stonehenge (20 miles)
which should not be allowed to be affected in any way by any proposed developments in Compton
Bassett.
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Compton Bassett Strategic Environmental Assessment
Heritage – Conservation Area
A substantial part of the Village is designated as a Conservation area on 28 May 1991, as shown
below.
Compton Bassett Conservation Area
(With acknowledgements to Ordnance Survey and Wiltshire Council)
Conservation areas are valued for their distinctiveness, visual appeal and historic character.
Research by the London School of Economics and English Heritage has found that this value is usually
reflected in the price of properties and their rate of appreciation compared to properties in other
areas, even after adjusting for location and other factors.
However, living in a conservation area means that some additional planning controls and
considerations will apply to all properties within the conservation area in order to provide protection
for those historic and architectural elements within Compton Bassett which make the place special
and are subject to additional planning controls, known as Article 4 Directions, which are listed in
Appendix 2 of the Compton Bassett Neighbourhood Plan.
There are no extant tree preservation orders listed within Compton Bassett Parish but trees are also
covered by the Article 4 Directions.
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Compton Bassett Strategic Environmental Assessment
Heritage – Public Rights of Way
The Compton Bassett Neighbourhood Plan designated area is criss-crossed by a number of rights of
way, as shown in yellow below. The public rights of way and the stunning local vistas attract tourists,
particularly to the bed and breakfast establishments and add to the appreciation of the landscape.
These features should not be disturbed by new developments.
Public Rights of Way
Selected National Heritage Data
Scheduled Monuments
(Acknowledgements fo DEFRA)
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Compton Bassett Strategic Environmental Assessment
Nature Conservation - Land Management
The Compton Bassett designated area consists mainly of grassland, arable land and mature
woodland which are managed by the 4 major landowners by means of a variety of agri-environment
schemes, as shown below:
Landowner 1
Landowner 2
Landowner 3
Landowner 4
Areas of Grassland & Woodland
Areas of agri-management
Landowners 1 & 3 are predominantly arable farmers, Landowner 2 is an organic dairy farmer and
Landowner 4 is a rare breed pig farmer.
The extensive woodlands contain a typical mixture of mature deciduous trees, notably with some old
oaks, 200 year old beech trees and large willows. The woodland is managed so as to encourage
wildlife by leaving dead timber and ivy on mature trees.
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Compton Bassett Strategic Environmental Assessment
A new mixed deciduous wood (Hayden Wood) has been recently planted (Landowner 4).
Cattle grazing (Landowner 2) produces a more varied sward than sheep grazing but a limited and
controlled amount of sheep and cattle grazing is carried out in restricted areas (Landowner 3) with
rare breed pig being farmed by Landowner 4. Note: The area farmed by Landowner 4 is not intensive
and large areas have been left to encourage wildlife and include a newly planted area of woodland –
Hayden Wood).
Land Management to protect environmental features include (but are not limited to) no applications
of lime or pesticides, except in the case of non-organic arable land for the control of spear thistle,
creeping thistle, curled dock, broad leaved dock, common ragwort, nettles, and other undesirable
species where herbicides may be applied outside the organic management area.
Undesirable weeds are generally controlled by topping and hand pulling in organic areas with
additional control by spot spraying and weed wiping in non-organic areas.
Semi-improved and/or rough grassland is managed to provide good conditions for Priority Habitat
types on calcareous grasslands and includes some green lanes enclosed by mature hedges which
support a number of wildflower species and provide a diverse habitat for a number of invertebrates
which benefits a number of farmland birds including the tree sparrow and yellowhammer.
Land Management is carried out at both the Entry Level Stewardship level (Landowners 1, 2, 3 & 4)
or the Higher Level Stewardship (Landowners 2 & 3).
The Land Management of Higher Level Stewardship (HLS) Land also includes restrictions on land
being levelled, in-filled, used for the storage or dumping of materials or used by motor vehicles or
machinery (except where necessary for the management of the land where this would be likely to
cause damage from rutting or compaction of the soil or otherwise damage any areas under Land
Management.
In addition, fires are prohibited (including the burning of trash or cuttings) where they could cause
damage to features of archaeological and/or historic interest or within 10 meters of tree canopies or
on any areas managed for their wildlife habitat interest. Note: This does not restrict the ability to
manage heathland vegetation by controlled burning in compliance with the Heather and Grass
Burning Regulations 1986).
Further restrictions include organised games, sports, rallies, camping, caravanning, shows and sales
events where this is likely to damage areas being managed for their wildlife, archaeological and/or
historic interest and is likely to cause unreasonable disturbance and/or unreasonable restriction to
Public Rights of way or “access land” as designated under the Countryside and Rights of Way Act
2000 together with metal detecting and archaeological fieldwork on all archaeological sites unless
agreed with Natural England in writing.
Within the designated area, arable land management (HLS) of hedgerows follows the Hedgerows
Regulations 1997 and includes some uncut hedgerows and a minimum height/width of around
2m/0.75m. Hedgerows with very high environmental value which support target species of farmland
birds, insects or mammals such as the tree sparrow, brown hairstreak and dormouse and hedgerows
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Compton Bassett Strategic Environmental Assessment
which make a significant contribution to the local landscape character and/or historically important
boundaries are also carefully managed.
Nature Conservation - Biodiversity - Flora
The designated area contains a diverse range of flora which are typical of calcareous (chalk)
grasslands and woodlands.
In particular, there are cowslips and rare bee orchids (landowner 2).
The HLS Land Management includes careful management of the Flora by using diverse grass margins
6 metres wide alongside arable cropping where the grass margin/strip is managed by a programme
of sequential cutting to provide habitat and foraging sites for insects and wild birds. The flora rich
grass margins reinforce field boundary patterns, strengthen the overall landscape of the area and
provide protection for important historic features and sensitive habitat which could be damaged by
agricultural operations and diffuse pollution.
The field margins (at full cover) contain no more than 5% of undesirable species such as nettles,
docks, thistles and ragwort and typically contain:
Wildflower/Grass Species
Common Bent
Crested Dogtail
Slender Creeping Red Fescue
Smaller Cat’s Tail
Yarrow
Common Knapweed
Wild Carrot
Lady’s Bedstraw
Field Scabious
%
8%
40%
28%
4%
0.5%
2.5%
0.8%
2%
1.2%
Wildflower/Grass Species
Oxeye Daisy
Birdsfoot Trefoil
Ribwort Plantain
Hoary Plantain
Cowslip
Meadow Buttercup
Yellow Rattle
Common Sorrel
%
1.5%
2%
0.5%
1%
0.5%
2%
1.5%
1.5%
Flowering plants are also contained in the grass margins to boost the availability of essential food
sources for a range of nectar feeding insects including butterflies, bumblebees and bees. The AONB
has a significant population of butterflies which “spill over” into the village during the summer.
These 6 metre grass margin areas are allowed for grazing during late autumn/early winter but not
during Spring/Summer.
The mixture of flowering plants in the grass margins typically contains:
Nectar Species
Red Clover
Alsike Clover
Sainfoin
Birdsfoot Trefoil
Musk Mallow
Black Knapweed (common)
%
34%
20%
29%
20%
4%
2%
The field corners are also managed to provide a grassy area with flowering plants and scrub which
benefits invertebrates, birds, reptiles and amphibians (where the margin is close to a water feature).
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Compton Bassett Strategic Environmental Assessment
Within the designated area such species are reported to include various species of mouse, shrew,
stoats, weasels, grass snakes, slow worms and great crested newts. In fact the area is noted for the
prevalence of slow worms and grass snakes.
In addition to the 6m grass margins, Landowner 3 also maintains a field circa 1 hectare specifically
dedicated to nectar flowers together with a similar size wild flower hay meadow and large pond.
Landowner 2 maintains a variety of wild species – sunflower field – Starve Knoll – wild bird seeds top
field.
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Compton Bassett Strategic Environmental Assessment
Nature Conservation - Biodiversity - Birds
The designated area is particularly rich in bird species which were surveyed by the British Trust for
Ornithology (Mr. E. Escott) as a breeding bird survey in April and July 2012 for a circuitous walking
route within the 1km area shown below (landowner 2) and were listed as:
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
Bird Species
Blackbird
Black Cap
Blue Tit
Bullfinch
Buzzard
Carrion Crow
Chaffinch
Chiffchaff
Coal Tit
Corn Bunting
Dunnock
Garden Warbler
Goldfinch
Goldcrest
Great Spotted Woodpecker
Great Tit
Jay
Linnet
Nuthatch
Pheasant
Pigeon
Red Leg Partridge
Robin
Song Thrush
Skylark
Swallow
White Throat
Willow Warbler
Yellowhammer
No in April 2012
11
1
12
1
2
4
18
5
2
1
1
Not Seen
2
Not Seen
1
Not Seen
1
2
1
4
46
2
3
1
5
2
Not Seen
1
1
No in July 2012
15
6
4
2
2
7
8
4
Not Seen
1
7
1
12
5
Not Seen
4
2
2
Not Seen
1
25
Not Seen
3
1
Not Seen
1
8
Not Seen
1
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Compton Bassett Strategic Environmental Assessment
In addition, to the above, the following bird species have also been observed within the designated
area: rooks (there are several large rookeries in the village), red kite, kestrels, swifts, green wood
pecker, magpies, barn owls, long eared owls and tawny owls. In recent years lapwings have also
been observed near Barnett’s Barn at the top of Hoopers Lane within the AONB (Landowner 3).
There are known to be active swallow nests in the land/buildings managed by Landowner 4 and Barn
Owls have roosted (but not nested) in one of the farm buildings but nevertheless a barn owl box has
been installed in the building.
The target “farmland birds” relating to the arable land in the designated area include lapwing (blue)
and corn buntings (pink), are distributed as shown below.
“Farmland bird” main distribution
Arable fields support more breeding skylarks than any other habitat, particularly in large open fields
with vegetation less than 50cm high where the breeding season can extend from April to August with
up to 3 nesting attempts and can be accommodated by normal arable rotation. The HLS Land
Management includes leaving unsown plots with an area of around 16m2 spaced at a density of
around 2 plots per hectare located away from field boundaries, margins, tree lines and woods (fields
less than 10 hectares only).
In addition land parcels are also managed to provide a sustained source of food during winter
months for targeted wild birds using a wild bird seed mixture on field margin strips which provide a
sustainable feed supply through the winter until 31 March each year. The wild bird seed mixtures
are as follows:
Corn Bunting
Spring Barley
Triticale
Millet
Mustard
60%
20%
10%
10%
Grey Partridge
Kale
Cereal
Millet
Quinoa
Fodder Radish
10%
55%
20%
10%
5%
Tree Sparrow
White/red Millet
Triticale
Spring Wheat
Quinoa
Fodder Radish
40%
25%
15%
10%
10%
Finally, Landowner 2 rears several thousands of pheasants and some partridge every year in the local
woods and holds a number of shoots in the season. A number of woodland areas land parcels are
set aside to provide natural seed to supplement the artificial feeding stations, all of which provide
additional support for the wild bird species.
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Compton Bassett Strategic Environmental Assessment
Nature Conservation - Biodiversity - Mammalia
The designated area contains dairy cows (Landowner 2) and other cattle and sheep (Landowner 3)
also graze on appropriate fields in the summer within the managed field boundaries and managed
area which provides appropriate environmental protection. In addition, Landowner 4 farms several
types of rare breed pigs outside the AONB limits including saddlebacks, large blacks, oxford sandy
and blacks and mangolitzas.
A number of private individuals keep small numbers of sheep, goats, ducks, geese, rabbits and ferrets
together with various breeds of domestic dogs. In relation to domestic dogs, it is important for all
owners in the designated area to exercise appropriate control over their animals at all times to avoid
unnecessary distress to the dairy cows, cattle, sheep and pheasants.
The designated area also has a significant deer population (roe and muntjac) with a large indigenous
populations of badgers, weasels, stoats, rabbits, various types of mice and water voles in the water
courses.
There is also a significant population of bats within the designated area.
The land/buildings managed by Landowner 4 were surveyed by the Dorset Wildlife Trust in August
and September 2009 and showed significant soprano pipistrelle and long eared bat activity together
with the presence of yellow underwing moth wings left by feeding bats. The survey concluded that
the site “has generally good potential for roosting bats as a range of buildings are present with
varying crevices for bats” and Landowner 4 has installed a number of roof access points together
with bat boxes for roosting bats and bat friendly habitats as advised by Dorset Wildlife Trust. The site
is also surrounded by farmland and some good hedgerows that would act as flight lines to small
areas of woodland and to the large areas of woodland to the south east of the farm site.
This survey is likely to be typical of the designated area as there are numerous similar farm buildings,
hedgerows, small woodland areas and large woodland areas.
In fact bats are a common feature in the village, particularly at dusk and numerous pipistrelle bats
having been reported.
All species of bat are protected by the Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981 with further amendments
by way of the CRoW Act 2000 and the Conservation (Natural Habitats) Regulations 1994. Under
these laws and regulations it is an offence to:
1. Intentionally, deliberately or recklessly kill, injure, capture or keep a bat
2. Intentionally, deliberately or recklessly damage, destroy or obstruct access to any place used
for rest, shelter or protection by a bat (i.e. bat roosts)
3. Intentionally or recklessly disturb a bat whilst it is occupying a structure or place which it
uses for that purpose
Note: Disturbing bats or damaging or destroying their roosts in dwelling houses may not be offences
if English Nature is notified and allowed a reasonable time to advise on whether the proposed action
should be carried out and, if so, the method to be to be used. However, failure to seek advice could
result in prosecution.
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Compton Bassett Strategic Environmental Assessment
It is recommended that the use of chemicals toxic to bats be avoided; that tree management work
should take account of any bats; that dead, dying or hollow trees are left standing where possible;
rodent bait should be covered and loft water tanks should be covered.
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Compton Bassett Strategic Environmental Assessment
Landscape – AONB
The North Wessex Downs have an AONB designation which terminates at the road running through
the middle of Compton Bassett, effectively the right hand side of the map above is within the AONB,
as shown in green below, with the Compton Bassett Conservation Area outlined in orange.
AONB
AONB
AONB
The landscape is of high visual amenity which acts as a tourist attraction to support the local
economy, particularly the bed and breakfast businesses with the village and the White Horse Inn.
Typical views of the AONB and the village within the Neighbourhood Plan designated area are shown
and typical local visual amenity in and around Compton Bassett are shown below:
Views of Compton Bassett from the AONB
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Compton Bassett Strategic Environmental Assessment
Visual Amenity in and around Compton Bassett
Visual amenity is impaired at one end of Compton Bassett but the presence of Wiltshire’s largest
landfill site to the south west of the designated area which is also adjacent to a large area of solar
panels which are clearly visible from the AONB, as shown below.
Although these 2 areas are visible from the AONB they are not visually intrusive at the bottom of the
escarpment and in most parts of the Compton Bassett Conservation Area.
However, the landfill site does make a negative contribution to air quality in Compton Bassett, as
described in the next section.
Landfill Site (view towards AONB)
Solar Panel Farm (view from AONB)
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Compton Bassett Strategic Environmental Assessment
Air Quality and Environmental Pollution
The presence of Wiltshire’s largest landfill site around 1 mile (2km) to the south west of the
designated area makes a negative contribution to air quality in Compton Bassett due to the
prevailing wind direction from the southwest. The smells are quite nauseous and at times the smells
are sufficiently bad so as to prevent Compton Residents from being able to garden or open windows.
This is likely to have a highly negative effect on bed and breakfast businesses and local amenity.
Prevailing south westerly
wind direction
Landfill area
There have been numerous formal complaints about the smells to the Environmental Agency from
the Parish Council and local residents during 2013 and 2014 and, in August 2014, the complaints
were sufficiently serious to make the National Press (Daily Telegraph & Daily Mail, August 2014).
Hills had previously issued a statement to Compton Bassett residents regarding the smells:
“Hills’ view was that the smells are likely to be emanating from Cell 21 (the current
operational landfill cell) as a direct result of the exceptional rainfall this last Winter. Hills
are currently taking a number of preventative measures to eliminate future smells.
Firstly they have already laid 6 horizontal pipes and connected 5 vertical wells in the waste
body of Cell 21 to remove in-waste gases as they are generated and are intending to install
a further 12 pin wells in the next 2 weeks which will remove gases from the top few metres
of the Cell 21 waste pile. Hills have also installed a clay cap on the flanks of cell 21 to seal in
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Compton Bassett Strategic Environmental Assessment
the waste to help prevent odorous release and further rainfall water ingress. This
installation of clay has been installed following the Environment Agency agreed CQA plan
(Construction Quality Assurance).
The horizontal and pin well installation measures take around 5-6 weeks to become fully
operational and are reported to have been successful elsewhere. As a consequence, Hills
predict that the smells should have started to decrease and should significantly decrease by
the end of June. In any event, Cell 21 is due to be capped off this August which should
mean that the smells cease altogether thereafter.”
Unfortunately, (as at October 2014) the smells have not ceased and complaints are continuing.
However, the landfill site is due to close in 2022 and the landfill area is scheduled to be returned to
agricultural use, so that the malodorous effects should at least be temporary and limited to 2022.
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Compton Bassett Strategic Environmental Assessment
Water Resources, Climate Change and Flood Risk
Drinking water is supplied to Compton Bassett by Wessex Water who source their supply from
groundwater. The local chalk geology provides a natural aquifer and a plentiful supply of local runoff water such that houses in Compton Bassett had their own garden wells until quite recently.
Historically, Compton Bassett operated a forge and laundry both of which require large amounts of
running water.
In fact the local streams rarely stop flowing even in the driest summers and can give rise to a flood
risk due to high levels of run-off during flash floods. A recent deluge (September 2014) deposited 55
mm of water (a month’s rainfall) in around 12 hours which caused temporary flooding in those
houses opposite the main gullies which funnel run-off from the AONB escarpment, as shown below
(blue arrows). In the lowest lying property in the centre of the village (opposite the Benson Village
Hall in Briar Leaze), the flooding regularly causes the release of raw sewage into the property garden
(red star). This is currently being managed by clearing the drainage ditches and roadside drains.
The onwards drainage from the escarpment via the streams and ditches creates the main flood risk
area (Flood zone 1) as shown in blue below.
Flash flood
risk
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Compton Bassett Strategic Environmental Assessment
Land and Soil Resources
The land within the Compton Bassett Neighbourhood designated area is classified as a “rolling clay
lowland” in the west, a central wooded scarp and a calcareous (chalk) downland in the North Wessex
Downs AONB in the east.
The Compton Bassett Neighbourhood Plan designated area has the following characteristics:
1. Mixed arable and pastoral land with water courses marked by Willows
2. Varied field pattern with networks of hedges and mature hedgerow trees
3. Woodland blocks including some ancient woodland of high ecological value and scattered
mature trees
4. Wooded escarpment bisecting the designated area from north to south
5. Chalk downland of mixed arable and pastoral with networks of hedgerows, mature
hedgerow trees and green lanes
Geological Map of Wiltshire
Compton Bassett Neighbourhood Plan
Designated Area
The chalk escarpment and chalk downs (Landowners 2 and 3) have historically been quarried for
chalk blocks which have been used as the main building material for the local houses in Compton
Bassett.
Geologically the main mineral is chalk with a sub-surface layer of Gault Clay and some sand/gravel
deposits to the south west of the designated area which forms part of an extensive Minerals
Resource Zone between Compton Bassett and Calne.
Within this zone, the agricultural land (classified as Grade 2 = best and Grade 3 = most versatile)
located in the west of the Compton Bassett Neighbourhood Plan designated area contains a sand
deposit of around 23.4 hectares which is estimated to have a potential yield of around 450,000 te of
sand which is located ~1.2km from Compton Bassett and close to Freeth Farm and a few private
residences. The AONB of the North Wessex Downs is some 300 metres to the east of the site.
There are also operational quarries located at Sands Farm (South) and Lower Compton (East) both of
which operate as landfill facilities.
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Compton Bassett Strategic Environmental Assessment
If the site within the designated area is also quarried then landfill would not be permitted as there is
sufficient permitted landfill capacity for Wiltshire, so the site would be restored in a phased manner
to agricultural land incorporating hedgerows, ponds, arable fields and woodland using inert material.
The main ecological constraints are Abberd Brook which flows along the northern boundary of the
site together with the network of hedgerows, tree lines and small copses which are crucial to the
permeability of wildlife which includes badgers, bats, grass snakes and water voles.
Extraction activities are capable of producing dust clouds in dry weather and noise pollution.
Access would be likely to be via Sandpit Lane as there is a 7.5 te weight restriction through Compton
Bassett.
The site is situated predominantly within Flood Zone 1 where the land interacts with Abberd Brook.
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Compton Bassett Strategic Environmental Assessment
Human Population – demographics, employment, education & housing
Demographics
The population of Compton Bassett has been a slow decline since the 1800s and is currently at just
over 200.
In the 2013 survey, questionnaires were returned from 47 properties, representing the views of 85
(38%) individuals, 60 of whom came to a feedback presentation in Compton Bassett Village Hall.
The age distribution of the 85 individuals of Caucasian ethnicity shows that around 70% of the
sample is over 50 with nearly 40% over 60 as follows:
Compton Bassett Age Distribution – 2013 Questionnaire
The total number of villagers (circa 200) means that any new housing development should be
appropriate to the scale of the existing population and number of dwellings (circa 97). For example,
this means that even a limited development of around 7 additional houses would be a 10% increase
in dwellings and people.
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Compton Bassett Strategic Environmental Assessment
Employment
There are a significant number of farms and other businesses which provide employment with within
Compton Bassett Parish.
Farms: Dugdales Farm, Manor Farm (comprising Austins Farm, Street Farm, and Manor Farm),
Compton Farm, Buttle Farm (formerly Home Farm), Freeth Farm and Nolands Farm.
Businesses: There are around 24 businesses within Compton Bassett Parish which cover a diverse
range of services including a public house, dairy farming, rare breed pig farming, holiday lets,
residential lets, bed and breakfast, telecommunications, web site design, power station engineering
consultancy, electrical services, building services, plumbing, professional artists, vintage car sales,
mobile catering, investment management, garden services, hair dressing, accountancy and public
relations and communications management.
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
Business
Austin’s Farm
Buttle Farm
Compton Farm
Dugdale’s Farm
Peter Alberry Ltd
Barlow Communications Ltd
EXL Services Ltd
Travel
The IT Partner Ltd
Retail
The Hairpin Company Ltd
Compton Bassett Consultants Ltd
Dove Cottage B&B
The White Horse Ltd
Mobile Catering
International Energy Solutions Ltd
Mas Management Ltd
Hairdresser
Plumbing Services
Professional Painter
Therapist
Hungrylab Electrical Ltd
Trust
Great Western Landscaping Company Ltd
Business Activity
Dairy Farming
Rare Breed Pig Farming
Arable Farming
Arable Farming
Power Station Consulting
PR Consulting
Marketing & Online shop
Travel
Telecommunications
On-line shop
Antique Cars
Web Site Design & Author
Bed & Breakfast
White Horse Inn
Catering
Financial Services
Personnel Development
Hairdressing
Plumbing
Printing & Art Workshops
Reiki
Electrician
Trust Management
Landscaping
In addition, a significant number of people (around 25% or 52 out of 223 villagers) work from home
on a permanent or occasional basis, relying on the internet for connectivity.
The Steering Group believe that appropriate rural employment and the ability to be able to work
from home is socially desirable and environmentally preferable and should be encouraged,
particularly by the development of internet connectivity and broadband speeds throughout Compton
Bassett which would improve the long term sustainability of Compton Bassett by reducing the need
to travel.
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Compton Bassett Strategic Environmental Assessment
Education
The Parish does not have any schools within its boundaries, but mindful of any growth in population
of school going youngsters in the Parish it is important to ensure that the Education Authority
continues to provide for the Parish needs.
Housing
Wiltshire’s Core Strategy for the Calne area indicates that around 40 houses need to be provided in
the Calne Community area before 2026, as shown below.
Delivery of Housing 2006 to 2026 – Calne Community Area
Housing already provided for
Area
Calne
Remainder
Total
Requirement
Completions
2006-2026
2006-2011
1240
140
1380
420
65
485
Specific
Permitted
Sites
450
35
485
Housing to be identified
Strategic Sites
0
0
0
Remainder
To be
identified
370
40
410
Compton Bassett’s contribution to the total of 40 new houses would be expected to be shared by the
parishes of Compton Bassett, Cherhill, Hilmarton, Heddington, Bremhill and Calne Without, therefore
Compton Bassett’s contribution would be expected to be around 7 additional new houses, which
could be accommodated within the designated development area by selective demolition of a small
number of properties and re-building at a slightly higher housing density.
Compton Bassett Neighbourhood Plan requires that all developments within the Parish should be
sympathetic to and complement the predominant style of the existing properties within the Parish,
maintaining the rural character of the village. This approach was supported by 77% of the
questionnaire respondents. There was a majority of 51% in favour of affordable homes for local
people (39% opposed) which reduced to 40% in favour of small family homes (49% opposed) with
12% in favour of large family homes (83% opposed) and almost universal opposition (94%) to flats.
Compton Bassett has a limited area designated for development within the AONB and Conservation
Area which contains a number of properties which are owned by Green Square Housing Association
(“pink” properties) as shown in the exploded maps below.
Compton Bassett
Development Area
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Compton Bassett Strategic Environmental Assessment
Human Health
The health of people in the Calne area which includes Compton Bassett, is generally better than the
England average.
Life expectancy for females at 84.3 years is slightly better than across Wiltshire at 83.9 years and life
expectancy for males at 80.2 years is slightly worse than across Wiltshire at 80.4 years, although the
difference is not likely to be statistically significant.
However, the gap in healthy life expectancy across the community between the most deprived and
least deprived neighbourhoods is around 10.1 years. The CBNP seeks to limit any future degradation
in Compton Bassett.
Notably, Calne which has a much higher proportion of car traffic and HGVs than Compton Bassett or
the rest of Wiltshire has, at 122 cases per 100,000 population, the highest number of preventable
mortality cases. At 60 cases per 100,000 population the highest mortality caused by respiratory
disease, may well be linked to the diesel emissions from cars and HGVs which have resulted in Calne
being designated an Air Quality Management Area (AQMA) and having around 5 locations with air
quality above the EU statutory limit.
Health services are critical to the sustainability of any community. The Steering Group believe that
even though Compton Bassett is a small settlement with no health services provided directly within
the Parish, other than home care, it is important that health service providers continue to provide for
the Parish needs as it develops over the next 15 years.
The Compton Bassett development area is capable of accommodating around 7 additional properties
with a limited number of affordable housing development, including facilities for older people,
nursing accommodation and care facilities for which there is a demonstrable local need. In line with
the latest Housing Corporation standards this would be acceptable in Briar Leaze. However, such
development will be required to be designed to a high quality, so as to be indistinguishable from
other local developments. Wiltshire’s Core Policy 44 allows for the allocation of or granting of
planning permission for small sites comprising of affordable housing only as an exception to normal
policies.
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Compton Bassett Strategic Environmental Assessment
Infrastructure – Transport
Appropriate rural employment and the ability to be able to work from home is socially desirable and
environmentally preferable and should be encouraged, particularly by the development of internet
connectivity and broadband speeds throughout Compton Bassett which would improve the long
term sustainability of Compton Bassett by reducing the need to travel.
Transport–Cars: Around 88% of the questionnaire respondents use a car as their main mode of
transport and around 80% of the village Community access their properties via the single road
through the village. However, 93% of the village questionnaire respondents though that speeding
traffic was a significant problem in the village and 55% thought that this was dangerous on a daily
basis.
This is a key issue as not only is it dangerous and illegal, but it detracts significantly from rural village
life and would potentially restrict future local business development in the village.
Speeding Traffic in Compton Bassett: The neighbourhood speed watch has identified in excess of
5 vehicles per hour speeding through the village at peak times on a typical day, with a significant
fraction driving at 40-60 mph in the 30 mph zone past the entrance to Briar Leaze towards the centre
of the village. Note: Briar Leaze has the highest concentration of children in the village.
The Steering Group wish to see the Neighbourhood Plan address the high numbers of commercial
vehicles (including large Heavy Goods Vehicles) and cars which currently travel through the Parish
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Compton Bassett Strategic Environmental Assessment
using the only road as a “rat run” between the A4 and A3102, often at high speed well in excess of
the speed limits, as shown in the traffic speed snapshot on the morning of 12 December 2012.
Transport-Buses: The current bus timetables meet the requirements of 84% of the respondents of
the questionnaire but an improved evening service would be appreciated. The Steering Group
believes that to encourage less reliance on cars by residents and workers in the community and to
support viable local district shopping facilities, the bus frequencies should, at the very least, be
maintained at the current frequency during daytime and early evening hours.
The Bus services (Connect 2) are provided by Wiltshire Council with a bus shelter located next to the
Benson Village Hall.
Transport-Heavy Goods Vehicles: Compton Bassett currently has a weight restriction of 7.5te for
heavy goods vehicles (HGVs) and is generally unsuitable for the passage of large HGVs due to the
narrowness of the single road through the village and the presence of several sharp right angle
bends. Unfortunately, large HGVs which exceed the 7.5te weight limit do access the village from
time to time causing damage to verges, drainage ditches, road surfaces and pavements, as shown
below.
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Compton Bassett Strategic Environmental Assessment
Infrastructure – Material Assets
Public Amenities: St Swithin’s Church, White Horse Inn; Benson Village Hall, War Memorial, Briar
Leaze Playground, Village Pond; three post boxes; one public telephone box.
St Swithin’s Church
White Horse Inn
Benson Village Hall
War Memorial
The Village Pond
Benson Village Hall
Open Space and Playground
The Paddock
The Village Cricket Pitch
The current uses of these various buildings and open spaces furthers the social well-being and social
interest of the local community.
Emergency service providers need to monitor their service delivery models to ensure that response
times to remote areas, i.e. the Village, are maintained at national standards. The Steering Group
believe that the response times of the emergency services is an important community attribute.
Fire Hydrants are provided along the main road at marked points for access by the local fire services,
as required, and are thought to be entirely adequate for the needs of Compton Bassett.
Telephones: There is no public telephone box in Compton Bassett despite the fact that mobile
telephone service reception is severely limited by the local escarpments throughout most of the
village.
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Compton Bassett Strategic Environmental Assessment
Infrastructure – Broadband
Compton Bassett is uniquely disadvantaged because it is a conservation area where it is not always
possible to fit common technical alternatives such as satellite, mobile and commercial CRB/cable
alternatives. Consequently, a broadband service is either unobtainable or unacceptably slow.
The provision of a broadband service to all parts of the village at a minimum speed of 2MB/s is
absolutely crucial to sustaining village businesses (including farms) who are required to make on-line
returns to HMRC and HMG and to local villagers who are increasingly unfairly socially disadvantaged.
The village is served from 2 exchanges located at a distance of 2-3 miles from either end of the
village which extends to a total length of 2 miles. The wire connections are reported to be
aluminium, so that the signal degrades rapidly through the village to the point where the signal
strength is not sufficient to carry broadband at any workable speed.
Compton Bassett
Broadband Speeds
Conservation Area
No Internet
Hilmarton Exchange (3m)
1.22
3.91
2.41
No Internet
1.12
*
2.11*
1.64
No Internet
**
BT broadband tests only
run intermittently
0.47
**
0.13
*
Non BT Service Provider (Plus Net)
0.48
Calne Exchange
With BT cable
tunnel link (2m)
There is an existing (unused) BT cable tunnel from the Calne exchange (which is a super-fast
broadband area) which could be used to provide an acceptable 2MB/s broadband service to the
whole village. An independent assessment has shown that this solution is commercially viable and
would be quick to implement. However, Wiltshire Council have advised that since the area of
Compton Bassett (some of which cannot receive Broadband services at all) is served by the Calne
Exchange which has commercial super-fast broadband any further service provision before 2016
would be in breach of EU state aid rules. This is clearly unacceptable and an action group has been
formed to resolve the impasse.
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Compton Bassett Strategic Environmental Assessment
Infrastructure – Waste
Local Recycling Facilities: The Steering Group want Compton Bassett Parish to have a low carbon
footprint. Good kerbside collection of recyclable and compostable materials is important and the
Steering Group believe this must continue and be further improved over the life of the Compton
Bassett Neighbourhood Plan.
Infrastructure – Renewable Energy
The average electricity usage in Wiltshire is around 4,780 kWh per consumer year (2011 data) which
is slightly higher than the UK average. There is an adequate but limited capacity supply of electricity
to Compton Bassett via overhead lines with some solar panel generation for individual properties
and local businesses.
Compton Bassett has no direct gas supply, so energy for heating is primarily from oil, wood pellets,
LNG and wood.
There is no doubt that action will be required to limit the effects of climate but this should not be at
the expense of the AONB and the conservation area visual amenity by the excessive use of solar
panels on buildings and land within the conservation area or large solar panel farms within the
AONB.
There is an existing planning application for a very large Materials Recycling Facility and Waste
Transfer Station at Lower Compton adjacent to the designated area and the AONB. This facility will
produce some 40,000 tonnes per annum of power station fuel pellets for waste to energy power
stations. This may be the pre-cursor to a waste to energy power station which not only burns the
40,000 tonnes per annum of fuel pellets but also burns black bin bag waste which currently goes to
landfill. Lower Compton is an entirely unsuitable location for such a facility which would be optimally
located at Junction 17 next to the M4 (All such large MRF/WTS plants and waste to energy plants are
located next to good motorway connections – a comparable facility at Aldridge near Birmingham is
close to the M6, M5, M42). Such a development would increase the damage due to HGVs in
Compton Bassett and would violate Swindon & Wiltshire’s Waste Core Strategy, Wiltshire’s
sustainable transport policy and would exacerbate the air quality in the Calne AQMA which is already
in breach of EU statutory limits in a number of locations.
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Compton Bassett Strategic Environmental Assessment
SWOT Analysis
Strengths
The AONB, conservation area and village
character make Compton Bassett a very special
and attractive place to live and work
The village community spirit is well developed
and highly supportive of village life
Weaknesses
The village entrance signage is poor
Broadband and mobile service is either nonexistent or very poor
Speed limits are too high through the village
There are few pavements through the village
which increases the risk to walkers, dog walkers
and horse riders from speeding traffic
Opportunities
Threats
Provision of acceptable broadband and mobile
services would enable farmers and businesses to
meet their statutory obligations, improve the
quality of life, encourage tourists and reduce the
carbon footprint by enabling “working from
home”
The development area in the village is not
currently covered by a Village Plan so that
inappropriate developments could arise
New and improved Village Hall
A very large MRF/WTS is proposed adjacent to
the landfill site which is likely to increase HGV
traffic through the village
Increased sports and social activities
New Village Sign
Nature reserve around the Village pond and/or
paddock
No improvement in broadband and mobile
service provision
The nauseous smells from the landfill continue
to cause a public nuisance and potential health
hazard
Landfill activities could be extended in time and
scope by further quarrying
Closure of the White Horse Inn
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Compton Bassett Strategic Environmental Assessment
Chapter 3. Step A3 – Identifying Sustainability Issues
The key environment and sustainability issues identified through wide consultation within the village
are:
Heritage
1. There are a significant number of features within the area (listed buildings; scheduled
monuments; characteristic village vernacular; archaeological features) which require
protection for their heritage, archaeological and tourist attraction value.
2. The historic rights of way, by-ways and green lanes add to the appreciation of the local
heritage and landscape, and attract walkers and tourists and should not be threatened by
inappropriate developments. The White Horse Trail which crosses the designated area is of
particular significance in this respect and requires specific management.
3. Future developments should be of limited scope, minimal density and in keeping with the
character of the village to preserve its heritage. Without the Compton Bassett Development
Plan there is a danger that future developments might be of unlimited scope, low quality and
not in keeping with the character of the village which erode its heritage.
Biodiversity
1. The designated area contains a rich and diverse range of flora and fauna which are protected
by various land management schemes and must be protected and preserved from any
inappropriate development.
2. Without the Compton Bassett Development Plan, there is a danger that future developments
might be of unlimited scope which might adversely affect the local flora and fauna.
Landscape – AONB
1. A significant proportion of the designated area contains an AONB with stunning local vistas
with a very high quality visual amenity which should be conserved and enhanced to preserve
the natural beauty of the area. The chalk downs and escarpment are of particular
significance in this respect with a close inter-relationship between the landscape quality and
the wildlife habitats.
2. The AONB must be protected and preserved from any inappropriate development.
3. Without the Compton Bassett Development Plan, there is a danger that future developments
might be of unlimited scope and of low quality which might adversely affect the AONB,
landscape and visual amenity.
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Compton Bassett Strategic Environmental Assessment
Air Quality and Environmental Pollution
1. The air quality within the designated area is generally good with the exception of noxious
smells from the adjacent landfill site and potential dust clouds from future mineral extraction
activities. The air quality should be protected by improved landfill monitoring and
management followed by closure of the landfill in 2022 and limiting extraction activities in
close proximity to dwellings.
2. There is a risk that leachate from the landfill could pollute the water table, particularly in
times of flood which should be carefully managed.
3. Climate change is likely to result in more extreme weather patterns, particularly strong winds
and heavy rain, which could adversely impact water supply, communications, flood risk, food
production, transportation and buildings. Planning and development policies will need to
mitigate the impact of climate change as far as possible and new residential developments
should utilise energy efficient designs and renewable energy where possible.
4. Air quality will deteriorate with increased car and HGV traffic. Any increase of local car
traffic should be limited by appropriate development constraints and HGV traffic, which is
currently restricted to a 7.5 te limit, should be enforced more effectively through improved
signage and monitoring.
5. Without the Compton Bassett Development Plan, there is a danger that future developments
might be of unlimited scope and low quality which might lead to unacceptable increases in
car traffic and HGV traffic and small negative impacts on air quality, climate change and
environmental pollution.
Water Resources, Climate Change and Flood Risk
1. There are no significant water resource supply issues but there is a risk of an increasing risk
of flash flooding from the local escarpment due to climate change in some areas of the
village from which existing dwellings and any future development should be protected.
2. There is no doubt that action will be required to limit the effects of climate but this should
not be at the expense of the AONB and the conservation area visual amenity.
3. Without the Compton Bassett Development Plan, there is a danger that future developments
might be of unlimited scope and extent which might increase the risk of flash flooding in
some areas.
Land and Soil Resources
1. There is a risk that leachate from the landfill could pollute the water table, particularly in
times of flood which should be carefully managed.
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Compton Bassett Strategic Environmental Assessment
2. The land within the development area is a mixture of rolling lowland and chalk downland
which is classified as greenbelt agricultural land (Grade 2 - best and Grade 3 – most
versatile), with the exception of a small brownfield development area in the centre of the
village to which future development should be restricted.
3. Without the Compton Bassett Development Plan, there is a danger that future developments
might be of unlimited scope and not restricted to the brownfield development area in the
centre of the village which might put pressure on landowners to develop agricultural land.
Human Population – demographics, employment, education, housing & health
1. The demographics show an aging population with declining numbers such that limited future
development in keeping with the small population would be desirable.
2. Small local businesses such as new bed and breakfast facilities, guesthouses. local workshops
and businesses will be supported where the proposals are of an appropriate scale and
character for the village.
3. The area is attractive to tourists and walkers which helps to maintain local employment and
should be protected.
4. There is no provision for education within the village, which means that access to
appropriate facilities outside the village is essential together with the provision of good
broadband services to facilitate distance learning.
5. The Wiltshire Core Strategy and the Calne area strategy set out the quantum of future
housing provision for Compton Bassett. Small scale high quality housing developments of up
to 8 houses (or an appropriate mixture of affordable housing, including bungalows for the
elderly), will be supported in the designated development area where proposals are
consistent with the village design statement.
6. There is no provision for healthcare within the village, which means that access to
appropriate facilities outside the village is essential together with the provision of good
broadband services to facilitate remote access to GP facilities.
7. Without the Compton Bassett Development Plan, there is a danger that future developments
might be of unlimited scope which might improve the demographics and housing availability
but which would have a negative impact on employment, education and health.
Infrastructure – Transport, Material Assets, Broadband, Waste
and Renewable Energy
1. The rural area is heavily dependent on the use of cars and public transport of which the sole
provision is the Connect 2 service which must be maintained and enhanced.
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Compton Bassett Strategic Environmental Assessment
2. Car parking facilities are limited in the village and adequate provision for car parking must be
provided by future developments.
3. Any increase in car traffic should be limited due to the narrow roads and lack of pavements
to improve road safety together with the introduction of appropriate lower speed limits
4. Any increase in HGVs through the village should be limited due to the narrow roads, lack of
pavements, sharp right angled bends at either end of the village and to minimise damage to
verges, roadside drainage, road surfaces and pavements.
5. The few remaining material assets and public amenities, particularly the White Horse Inn and
Benson Village Hall, are crucial to village life and the attraction of visitors and tourists and
should be preserved and improved where possible.
6. Compton Bassett is uniquely disadvantaged because it is a conservation area where it is not
always possible to fit common technical alternatives such as satellite, mobile and commercial
CRB/cable alternatives. Consequently, a broadband service is either unobtainable or
unacceptably slow. The provision of a broadband service to all parts of the village at a
minimum speed of 2MB/s is absolutely crucial to sustaining village businesses (including
farms) who are required to make on-line returns to HMRC and HMG and to local villagers
who are increasingly unfairly socially disadvantaged.
7. Good kerbside collection of recyclable and compostable materials is important and must
continue and be further improved.
8. There is no doubt that action will be required to limit the effects of climate, such as the
increased use of renewable energy (e.g. solar panels) but this should not be at the expense
of the AONB and the conservation area visual amenity.
9. Without the Compton Bassett Development Plan, there is a danger that future developments
might be of unlimited scope and of low quality which would have a negative effect on
transport, material assets, waste and renewable energy. However, the effect on Broadband
is uncertain.
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Compton Bassett Strategic Environmental Assessment
Step A4 - Sustainability Assessment Framework
The sustainability assessment framework is based on the key sustainability topics identified
previously.
Sustainability
Topic
Heritage
Biodiversity
Landscape
Sustainability Appraisal
Objectives
CBNP 7: Preserve the
character
of
Compton
Bassett, conservation area,
historic
buildings
and
historic rights of way
CBNP 4: Sensitive
development which
protects and enriches the
habitat and biodiversity of
Compton Bassett
CBNP 10: Protection of rural
landscape, AONB, visual
amenity, local green space
& air quality
Key Issues
Potential Indicators
Conservation and
enhancement of historic
character, listed
buildings, assets of
community value and
historic rights of way
when threatened by
inappropriate
commercial
development and
commercial pressures
Monitoring and
protection of habitat
and biodiversity
Loss of historic
character, listed
buildings, assets of
community value &
historic rights of
way
Maximise development
of previously used land
and minimise use of
greenfield areas
Loss of greenfield
areas
Appropriate housing
densities with minimal
in-filling
Protection of the AONB
and local green space
Protection of air quality
Air Quality and
Environmental
Pollution
Loss of habitat and
biodiversity
Inappropriate high
housing densities
Large scale in-filling
Damage to AONB &
visual amenity
Poor air quality
Nauseous smells
e.g. from local
landfill
CBNP 10: Protection of rural
landscape, AONB, visual
amenity, local green space
& air quality
Maintenance of good
air quality with air
pollution from local
landfill and quarrying
activities
CBNP 5: Encourage recycling, minimisation of the
carbon footprint and the
increased use of renewable
energy within the Parish
Low use of
Mitigation for the
effects of road transport renewable energy
Encourage use of
renewable energy & re-
Poor air quality
Nauseous smells
e.g. from local
landfill
Extension of landfill
beyond temporary
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Compton Bassett Strategic Environmental Assessment
cycling
permission to 2022
Number of houses
meeting the BREEM
standard for
sustainable homes
Water
Resources,
Climate
Change and
Flood Risk
CBNP 5: Encourage recycling, minimisation of the
carbon footprint and the
increased use of renewable
energy within the Parish
Protection of people
and property from flood
risk
Ensuring drainage
ditches, storm drains,
drains & gullies remain
CBNP 6: Minimise the clear
environmental impact of
climate change and flood Encourage sustainable
risk where possible
developments with
efficient use of water
resources
Land and Soil
Resources
Human
Population
demographics,
employment,
education,
housing &
health
Encourage use of
renewable energy & recycling
CNBP 11: Protection of land Protection of land and
and soil resources
soil resources by
maintaining the soil
quality at Grade 2 (best)
and Grade 3 (most
versatile)
CBNP 8: Strengthen and Support local farming
support local economic and local businesses,
activity
including tourism
CBNP 2: Maintain and
improve local services for
existing and new residents
CBNP 9: Delivery of a high
quality housing growth
strategy tailored to the
needs and context of
Compton Bassett
CBNP 10: Protection of rural
landscape, AONB, visual
amenity, local green space
& air quality
Provide a supply of
affordable housing
which meets the Calne
area strategy
Provide a supply of local
housing which meets
local needs and has full
local support
Promote a supply of
local housing which
complies with the
design statement
Direct and remote
Increased traffic
Number of flooded
properties per year
Amount of raw
sewage release
Adequate sewage
disposal for
developments
Unsustainable
developments and
developments in
flood zones
Low use of
renewable energy
Loss of soil quality
Developments on
agricultural land
Appropriate small
scale local business
development
Appropriate local
housing
development which
conforms to the
Compton Bassett
Neighbourhood
Plan and design
statement
Loss of access to
education facilities
and local health
care through poor
broadband service
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Compton Bassett Strategic Environmental Assessment
access to education &
health services
Reduce the HGV and car
traffic through the
village
CBNP3: Improve traffic
safety and transport
services
Transport,
Material
Assets,
Broadband,
Waste
and
Renewable
Energy
Provision of local bus
service
Loss of service
Traffic speed limit
reduction
Speedwatch data
showing speed
increases
Increased home
working to reduce
transport burden
Infrastructure
CBNP 1: Maintain and
improve assets of
community value
CBNP 2: Maintain and
improve local services for
existing and new residents
Increased HGV &
car traffic & damage
to verges etc
Reduction in home
working
Benson Village Hall roof
& general maintenance
Closure of Village
Hall
Upkeep of grade I & II
listed buildings &
monuments
Degradation of
grade I & II assets
Closure of White Horse
Inn
Loss of key village
amenity
Provision of broadband
access & improvement
of broadband speed for
all Compton Bassett
residents
Continuation of no
broadband service
or very poor
broadband service
CBNP 5: Encourage recycling, minimisation of the
Encourage use of
carbon footprint and the
renewable energy & reincreased use of renewable
cycling
energy within the Parish
Low use of
renewable energy
Low recycling rates
Compton Bassett Parish Council and the Steering Group have been working on the development of
the Compton Bassett Neighbourhood Plan since July 2013.
Since Compton Bassett is a small close knit community it has been possible to involve all residents in
a series of public consultations which identified a range of sustainability issues which have been
recorded and addressed as appropriate in successive public meetings as part of the development of
the draft Compton Bassett Neighbourhood Plan.
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Compton Bassett Strategic Environmental Assessment
Step A5 – Appropriateness and robustness of the scope of the
Sustainability Assessment and the assessment framework
The compatibility of the sustainability objectives and the assessment framework has been reviewed
by the Statutory Consultees and modified in the light of their comments, as described in Appendix 3.
Sustainability Objectives
Landscape - AONB
Air Quality & Environmental Pollution
Water Resources, Climate Change & Flood Risk
Land & Soil Resources
Human Population - demographics
Human Population - employment
Human Population - education
Human Population - housing
Human Population - health
Infrastructure - Transport
Infrastructure - Material Assets
Infrastructure - Broadband Service
Infrastructure - Mobile Service
Infrastructure - Waste
Infrastructure - Renewable Energy
(C)
(C)
(C)
(C)
(NL)
(NL)
(C)
(C)
(C)
(C)
(C)
(NL)
(C)
(NL)
(NL)
(C)
(C)
(NL)
(NL)
(NL)
(U)
(NL)
(NL)
(C)
(C)
(C)
(C)
(C)
(C)
(C)
(C)
(C)
(C)
(C)
(NL)
(NL)
(NL)
(C)
(NL)
(NL)
(NL)
(NL)
(NL)
(NL)
(C)
(C)
(NL)
(NL)
(NL)
(NL)
(NL)
Sensitive development which protects the
habitat & biodiversity of Compton Bassett
Encourage recycling, minimisation of the
carbon footprint and the increased use of
renewable energy within the Parish
Improve traffic safety & transport services
Biodiversity
Maintain & improve local services for existing &
new residents
Heritage
Maintain & improve assets of community value
Key
Compatible (C)
Uncertain (U)
Conflicting (C)
No Link (NL)
CBNP Objectives 1-5
(C)
(C)
(C)
(C)
(C)
(NL)
(C)
(C)
(NL)
(C)
(C)
(NL)
(NL)
(C)
(NL)
(C)
(C)
(NL)
(C)
(C)
(C)
(NL)
(NL)
(NL)
(NL)
(NL)
(C)
(C)
(C)
(NL)
(C)
(NL)
(NL)
(C)
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Compton Bassett Strategic Environmental Assessment
Sustainability Objectives
Landscape - AONB
Air Quality & Environmental Pollution
Water Resources, Climate Change & Flood Risk
Land & Soil Resources
Human Population - demographics
Human Population - employment
Human Population - education
Human Population - housing
Human Population - health
Infrastructure - Transport
Infrastructure - Material Assets
Infrastructure - Broadband Service
Infrastructure - Mobile Service
Infrastructure - Waste
Infrastructure - Renewable Energy
(U)
(U)
(U)
(U)
(NL)
(NL)
(C)
(C)
(C)
(C)
(C)
(NL)
(NL)
(C)
(C)
(NL)
(NL)
Delivery of a high quality housing growth
strategy tailored to the needs and context of
Compton Bassett
Strengthen and support local economic activity
Preserve the character of Compton Bassett,
conservation area, historic buildings & historic
rights of way
(C)
(C)
(C)
(NL)
(NL)
(NL)
(NL)
(NL)
(NL)
(NL)
(C)
(NL)
(C)
(NL)
(NL)
(NL)
(NL)
(C)
(C)
(C)
(C)
(C)
(NL)
(C)
(C)
(C)
(C)
(C)
(U)
(NL)
(C)
(NL)
(NL)
(C)
Protection of land and soil resources
Biodiversity
(C)
(C)
(C)
(C)
(C)
(C)
(NL)
(NL)
(NL)
(C)
(C)
(NL)
(NL)
(NL)
(NL)
(NL)
(C)
Protection of rural landscape, AONB, visual
amenity, local green space and air quality
Heritage
Minimise the environmental impact of climate
change on water resources and flood risk
wherever possible
Key
Compatible (C)
Uncertain (U)
Conflicting (C)
No Link (NL)
CBNP Objectives 6-11
(C)
(C)
(C)
(C)
(C)
(C)
(NL)
(NL)
(NL)
(C)
(C)
(NL)
(C)
(NL)
(NL)
(NL)
(C)
(C)
(C)
(C)
(C)
(C)
(C)
(NL)
(NL)
(NL)
(C)
(C)
(NL)
(C)
(NL)
(NL)
(NL)
(C)
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Compton Bassett Strategic Environmental Assessment
Chapter 4. Sustainability Assessment
The Compton Bassett Neighbourhood Plan contains a number of objectives, policies, development
limitations and aspirations together with the Compton Bassett Design Statement which provides
further planning guidance and potential environmental impact mitigations. These, together with a
number of alternatives have been assessed using the sustainability assessment framework described
in the previous section. The protocol adopted is white (no significant effect), green (acceptable or
beneficial effect); brown (unclear effect) and red (unacceptable or harmful effect).
Baseline Position
The sustainability assessment for the base line position (no change) and the effects of each of the
Compton Bassett Neighbourhood Plan policies are shown below.
11. Land & soil Resources
10. Landscape, AONB, Visual Amenity,
Green Space & Air Quality
9. Housing Growth Strategy
8. Local Economic Activity
7. Character, Conservation Area, Historic
Buildings & Rights of Way
6.Climate Change, Water Resources &
Flood Risk
5. Recycling, Carbon Footprint &
Renewables
4.Habitat & Biodiversity
3.Traffic & Transport Services
2.Local Services
1.Community Assets
Impact
Compton Bassett Neighbourhood Plan Policy
Baseline - No change
Sustainability Assessment
Heritage
Biodiversity
Landscape - AONB
Air Quality & Pollution
Water, Climate Change & Flood Risk
Land & Soil Resources
Human Population - demographics
Human Population - employment
Human Population - education
Human Population - housing
Human Population - health
Infrastructure - Transport
Infrastructure - Material Assets
Infrastructure - Broadband Service
Infrastructure - Mobile Service
Infrastructure - Waste
Infrastructure - Renewable Energy
The base line position (no change) is likely to result in unacceptable or harmful effects in Compton
Bassett due to the demographics (aging population); unchanged traffic speeding (potential risk to
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Compton Bassett Strategic Environmental Assessment
health); non-existent or poor broadband service (social disadvantage and harmful business effects);
and non-existent or poor mobile service (social disadvantage and harmful business effects). The
effects of each of these factors are uncertain for employment (ageing population; poor broadband
and mobile service) and for health (risk of injury from traffic speeding) as the effects are longer term
and will take some time to unfold. The base line position does not currently have any discernible or
significant effect on heritage, biodiversity, landscape, air quality, water resources, land and soil
resources, education, housing, material assets and waste.
The Compton Bassett Neighbourhood Plan objectives and policies have a presumption in favour of
sustainable development and require brownfield development which is concentrated within the
designated development area. However, the policies allow for strictly limited development outside
the designated development area, providing it complies with the Compton Bassett Design
Statement.
These policies are considered to be reasonable because:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
They have strong community support (98% of voters voted in favour)
They allow efficient and sustainable use of land
They protect the character, conservation area, historic buildings and rights of way
They protect the landscape, AONB, visual amenity, green space and air quality
They protect land and soil resources
They protect the local habitats and biodiversity
They protect community assets
They promote reasonable business development and housing growth
They encourage infrastructure development
They are consistent with National and Wiltshire policies
The Compton Bassett Neighbourhood Plan objectives and supporting policies together with a
number of policy alternatives, which were considered to be realistic in the context of a small rural
village, have been considered against the sustainability framework. The rationale for the
sustainability assessment and selection of the optimum policy is given below:
CBNP Policies 1-4 & Alternatives
Objective
1
Policy
Development will be supported where it
Maintain and improve assets of community is sympathetic to, maintains and
value
improves the local character, historic
and natural assets of community value,
providing it is fully compliant with the
Compton Bassett Design Statement.
The CBNP policy will preserve the heritage of the village, as some of the community assets are listed
buildings, which will also have a beneficial effect on the health and well-being of the Compton
Bassett community.
Community assets left to market forces
If community assets are left to market forces, they may decay through neglect or be irreparably
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Compton Bassett Strategic Environmental Assessment
damaged in the pursuit of commercial interests. This would have a long term detrimental effect on
the heritage of the village together with the health and well-being of the community. In addition, it
would increase the risk of damage to landscape, AONB and visual amenity.
Objective
2
Policy
Proposals for development will be
Maintain and improve local services for required to identify their likely
existing and new residents
impact on local infrastructure,
services and facilities and to
demonstrate how any such impacts
will be addressed, including
cumulative impacts.
Developments which maintain and
improve local services will be
supported providing they are fully
compliant with the Compton Bassett
Design Statement.
The CBNP policy will encourage a more sustainable lifestyle and promote development of the local
infrastructure, including emergency services, health services, and education services. The Parish
does not have any schools within its boundaries, but mindful of any growth in population of school
going youngsters in the Parish it is important to ensure that the Education Authority continues to
provide for the Parish needs. In this respect, access to broadband services for school work research
projects is becoming increasingly important and unfairly disadvantages village residents who live in
areas of Compton Bassett for which broadband services and mobile telephone services are not
currently available.
Broadband service (improvement) and mobile service (improvement) are key aspirational targets
which are likely to have a positive effect on Compton Bassett, if the proposals in the CBNP can be
achieved. Note: The key issue is not superfast broadband (20 MB/s) but access to broadband
services at a workable speed of 2 MB/s.
Other Services
Fire Hydrants are provided along the main road at marked points for access by the local fire services,
as required, and are thought to be entirely adequate for the needs of Compton Bassett.
Power is supplied by overhead cables to Compton Bassett and is vulnerable to disruption from falling
trees during periods of strong winds and lightning strikes.
There are no public telephone boxes in Compton Bassett despite them being essential as mobile
telephone service reception is severely limited by the local escarpments throughout most of the
village.
Local services left to market forces
If local services are left to market forces, then Compton Bassett will be uniquely disadvantaged as a
conservation area where it is not always possible to fit common technical alternatives to broadband
such as satellite, mobile and commercial CRB/cable alternatives.
This is likely to damage access to education, access to health, encourage unnecessary travel and
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Compton Bassett Strategic Environmental Assessment
damage local economic activity.
Hence broadband connectivity cannot be left to market forces as it is a key issue for Compton
Bassett which has a large number of businesses (around 24) based in the Village and people who
work from home from time to time (around 53 out of 223 villagers) which means that Compton
Bassett residents will be unfairly socially disadvantaged, particularly given the increasing
requirements of HMRC to file and pay for VAT on-line and retail options, ticket reservations which
are only available on-line.
Objective
Improve traffic safety and transport services
3
Policy
Developments which maintain and
improve traffic safety and transport
services will be supported providing
they are fully compliant with the
Compton Bassett Design Statement.
Developments should identify the
realistic level of traffic it is likely to
generate and assess the potential
impact on pedestrians, cyclists, horse
riders, dog walkers, road safety,
parking and congestion within the
Parish and include appropriate
mitigation measures.
Developments which would cause
unacceptable highway dangers will
not be permitted.
The CBNP policy is likely to have a positive effect on Compton Bassett as it may allow improvements
to traffic safety and safeguard sustainable modes of travel for pedestrians, cyclists, horse riders and
dog walkers and support the continuation of bus services (Connect 2) which are provided by
Wiltshire Council with a bus shelter located next to the Benson Village Hall.
Traffic speeds unrestricted
Unrestricted traffic speeds will encourage high speed traffic through the village which is noisy,
dangerous (health & safety issue) and illegal, and detracts significantly from rural village life.
High speed traffic will have undesirable effects on the character of Compton Bassett by making it a
high speed thoroughfare, causing vibration damage to listed buildings and causing some limited
environmental pollution.
Transport services left to market forces
Rural bus services are under threat as the commercial viability is not robust. This would potentially
have a negative effect on the community as it would make owning a car a pre-requisite for Compton
Bassett residents with non-sustainable implications and detrimental effects on access to health care
for older members of the community. The increased use of cars would be likely to have a negative
effect on air quality and pollution but probably not a very significant effect.
Compton Bassett has a 7.5 te weight restriction for heavy goods vehicles (HGVs) but this does not
prevent waste HGVs travelling through the village to Hills Waste solutions at Lower Compton via the
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Compton Bassett Strategic Environmental Assessment
shortest route from the A3102. Unrestricted access might allow more HGVs through Compton
Bassett at high speed causing significant damage to drainage ditches (increasing flood risk) and
damage to verges and paving together with an increased safety risk due to the general lack of
pavements in the village
Objective
4
Policy
Proposals for development which
Sensitive development which protects and protect and enrich the habitat and
enriches the habitat and biodiversity of biodiversity of Compton Bassett will
Compton Bassett
be supported, providing they are
fully compliant with the Compton
Bassett Design Statement.
The CBNP policy is likely to have a positive effect on Compton Bassett. The rich and diverse natural
environment, including the AONB, the local flora/fauna, landscape (particularly hegdgerows which
form natural wildlife corridors) and local green spaces is an integral part of Compton Bassett rural
life. The rural setting is highly prized by the community as evidenced by the Compton Bassett
consultation and plebiscite. The community wants to see a responsible balance between necessary
human activity and the natural environment, particularly wildlife and its habitat. Hence developers
will be required to protect and enrich the habitat and biodiversity in compliance with the Compton
Bassett Design Statement.
No protection of habitat & biodiversity
If no additional protection were afforded by the CBNP, then the AONB and conservation area would
still be protected by National and Wiltshire policies. However, this alternative provides least
guidance to developers taking into account the local nuances (including areas of Compton Bassett
which are outside the AONB and the central conservation area) which are not captured to the same
extent by national or regional policies which opens the door to a gradual degradation of habitat and
biodiversity on a piecemeal basis which would, in the long term degrade the local amenity to the
detriment of the health and well-being of the community.
Limited protection of habitat & biodiversity
Limited protection of the habitat and biodiversity (protection limited to the AONB and conservation
area) would not protect substantial areas of Compton Bassett which are outside the AONB and the
central conservation area. These areas outside the AONB and conservation area are not captured to
the same extent by national or regional policies, which potentially opens the door to a gradual
degradation of habitat and biodiversity on a piecemeal basis which would, in the long term degrade
the local amenity to the detriment of the health and well-being of the community.
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Compton Bassett Strategic Environmental Assessment
Sustainability Assessment
Limited protection of local habitat & biodiversity
No protection of habitat & biodiversity
4.Habitat & biodiversity
Transport services left to market forces
Traffic speeds unrestricted
3.Traffic & Transport Services
Alternatives
Local services left to market forces
And
2.Local Services
CBNP Policies 1-4
1.Community Assets
of
Baseline - No change
Impact
Community assets left to market forces
Alternative Policies
Heritage
Biodiversity
Landscape - AONB
Air Quality & Pollution
Water, Climate Change & Flood Risk
Land & Soil Resources
Human Population - demographics
Human Population - employment
Human Population - education
Human Population - housing
Human Population - health
Infrastructure - Transport
Infrastructure - Material Assets
Infrastructure - Broadband Service
Infrastructure - Mobile Service
Infrastructure - Waste
Infrastructure - Renewable Energy
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Compton Bassett Strategic Environmental Assessment
CBNP Policies 5-7 & Alternatives
Objective
5
Policy
Encourage re-cycling, minimisation of the Proposals for development should
carbon footprint and the increased use of encourage re-cycling, minimisation
renewable energy within the Parish
of the carbon footprint and the
increased use of renewable energy
within the Parish, and be fully
compliant with the Compton Bassett
Design Statement.
Proposals for wind turbines, biomass
generators, anaerobic digestion
plants and other energy from waste
technologies will not be supported as
they are incompatible with Compton
Bassett’s Conservation Area status
and the proximity of the AONB.
The CBNP supports the responsible local use of renewable energy for existing housing, businesses
and new developments, where acceptable and positive effects have been identified. Large scale
proposals for wind turbines, anaerobic digestors, solar panels in the AONB/local green space and
waste to energy plants will not be supported.
No encouragement of recycling
No encouragement of recycling is not likely to have any immediate effect as Compton Bassett
currently recycles bottles, tins, plastic, cardboard and green waste and there is a local household
recycling centre located about 2 km from the edge of Compton Bassett. However, such a policy
would result in sustained levels of landfill in the landfill site at the edge of Compton Bassett which
borders on the AONB which is not compatible the protection of the AONB (CBNP Policy 7) and would
not be compatible with National and Wiltshire policies on recycling.
No attempt to minimise carbon footprint
No attempt to minimise the carbon footprint is not likely to have any immediate effect. However,
such a policy is not compatible with CBNP policy 6 (Climate Change & Flood Risk) and would
contribute to global warming which is likely to be associated with more energetic and wetter
weather, particularly in Winter periods which will increase the flood risk.
Unrestricted deployment of renewable energy
Large scale renewable energy developments such as large scale solar farms which have already been
constructed close to the AONB and wind turbines would have a detrimental effect on the heritage,
biodiversity and landscape in that they interfere with the habitat of many wildlife species and
negatively impact the visual amenity.
The rotating blades of wind turbines are known to have a detrimental effect on birds and bats, based
on the increasing evidence of dead species at the base of wind turbines. This would have an
unacceptable effect on the diverse flora and fauna in the AONB. It is not certain whether the low
frequency noise would have any long term health effects but there is mounting evidence that such
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Compton Bassett Strategic Environmental Assessment
noise can affect sleeping patterns and damage the inner ear.
A “waste to energy” power station is also an alternative either within the designated area or (more
likely) sited within the adjacent landfill boundary. The site is already designated (Wiltshire &
Swindon Waste Core Strategy 2006-2026) as a site for waste management (excluding waste to
energy). However, the potential approval of a recent (or future) planning application for a “fuel
pellet factory” producing around 40,000 tonnes per annum from plastic and cardboard might
encourage waste to energy plant development applications at the same location since such a plant
would potentially have the ability to burn black bin bag waste to reduce the landfill tax burden and
comply with EU Directives. This would be likely to have an unacceptable and harmful effect on the
heritage, biodiversity, landscape (particularly the AONB which is literally “just access the road” and
air quality due to the emissions and loss of visual amenity with limited benefits on local
employment.
Objective
Policy
Proposals for development should
Minimise the environmental impact of climate minimise the environmental impact
6 change on water resources and flood risk
of climate change on water
where possible
resources and flood risk where
possible and be fully compliant with
the
Compton
Bassett
Design
Statement.
The CBNP supports proposals to minimise the environmental impact of climate change on water
resources and flood risk. Drinking water is supplied to Compton Bassett by Wessex Water who
source their supply from groundwater. The local chalk geology provides a natural aquifer and a
plentiful supply of local run-off water such that water shortages are very rare.
Flood ditches are maintained by local farmers and, in general, they are successful in preventing
flooding.
Roadside drainage is an issue during periods of heavy rain and constant attention is required to
ensure that the roadside ditches are properly maintained.
No attempt to minimise impact of climate change, water resources & flood risk
No attempt to minimise the effects of climate change and flood risk will not likely to have any
immediate effect on water resources and flood risk. However, such a policy is not compatible with
CBNP policy 6 (Climate Change & Flood Risk) and would contribute to global warming which is likely
to be associated with more energetic and wetter weather, particularly in Winter periods which will
decrease the possibility of water shortages but increase the flood risk.
In recent years minor flooding has occurred at the Village Pond and heavy run-off down gullies from
the escarpment between the War Memorial and the centre of the village has flooded a number of
local houses. The most serious incident involved the storm drains which lifted during heavy rain
(December 2013) and released raw sewage onto the garden of a bungalow at the lowest point in the
village. This could increase if new developments did not attempt to minimise the environmental
impact of climate change.
The flooding risk is also exacerbated by large potholes (classed as over-runs by Wiltshire Council) but
which extend into the road and are several inches deep, causing a significant road hazard.
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Compton Bassett Strategic Environmental Assessment
Objective
7
Policy
Proposals for development should
Preserve the character of Compton Bassett, preserve the character of Compton
conservation area, historic buildings and Bassett, conservation area, historic
historic rights of way
buildings and historic rights of way
and be fully compliant with the
Compton Bassett Design Statement.
The CBNP policy protects the character, conservation area, historic buildings and rights of way,
particularly when taken in the context of the Compton Bassett Design Statement. Compton Bassett’s
physical attractiveness is underpinned by its heritage and is the key to the long term success of the
village in terms of economic activity (tourism, particularly as a base from which to explore Wiltshire)
and the well-being of the residents who value the distinctive character of the village above other
attributes. This policy, when taken together with the CBNP policy on economic activity provides the
optimal balance between “preservation in aspic” and reasonable economic activity, compliant with
the Compton Bassett Design Statement.
Total protection for conservation area
This policy would effectively prevent all change in the conservation area of Compton Bassett and
would effectively preserve Compton Bassett in “aspic” akin to living in a museum. This is not
considered to be reasonable, healthy or practicable and is inconsistent with Wiltshire policies. It is
also incompatible with the reasonable deployment of renewable energy in the conservation area but
would allow renewable energy within the Compton Bassett designated but outside the conservation
area, consistent with the Compton Basset Design Statement. The policy may also prejudice the long
term protection of community assets if all remedial work were to be prohibited.
No protection of character, conservation area & historic buildings
This policy provides no additional protection but protection would still be afforded by conservation
status but would potentially endanger the character, conservation area and historic buildings in
Compton Bassett together with the areas outside the conservation area which would potentially
cause too much harm or potential harm to conservation interests which are a core feature of the
CBNP.
No protection of rights of way
This policy provides no additional protection but protection would still be afforded by the
Countryside and Rights of Way Act, 2000. Potential loss of rights of way would endanger the
heritage of Compton Bassett and potentially cause long term harm to the well-being of the
community.
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Compton Bassett Strategic Environmental Assessment
Sustainability Assessment
No protection of rights of way
No protection of character, conservation area &
historic buildings
Total protection for conservation area
7. Character, Conservation Area, Historic Buildings &
Rights of Way
No attempt to minimise climate change & flood risk
6.Climate Change, Water Resources & Flood Risk
Alternatives
Unrestricted deployment of renewable energy
And
No attempt to minimise carbon footprint
CBNP Policies 5-7
No encouragement of recycling
Of
Baseline - No change
Impact
5. Recycling, Carbon Footprint & Renewables
Alternative Policies
Heritage
Biodiversity
Landscape - AONB
Air Quality & Pollution
Water, Climate Change & Flood Risk
Land & Soil Resources
Human Population - demographics
Human Population - employment
Human Population - education
Human Population - housing
Human Population - health
Infrastructure - Transport
Infrastructure - Material Assets
Infrastructure - Broadband Service
Infrastructure - Mobile Service
Infrastructure - Waste
Infrastructure - Renewable Energy
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Compton Bassett Strategic Environmental Assessment
CBNP Policies 8-11 & Alternatives
Objective
Strengthen
activity
8
and
support
local
Policy
Development proposals which
economic strengthen and support local
economic activity will be supported,
providing they are fully compliant
with Compton Bassett
Neighbourhood Plan policies and the
Compton Bassett Design Statement.
The conversion of existing buildings
and small scale expansion of existing
employment premises will be
supported, providing they are fully
compliant with the Compton Bassett
Design Statement.
Development proposals which
promote or provide broadband and
high speed broadband services will
be supported, providing they are
fully compliant with the Compton
Bassett Design Statement.
The CBNP policy strengthens and supports local economic activity consistent with the Compton
Bassett Design Statement. There are around 25 existing businesses in Compton Bassett, with a
significant number of people working from home on a permanent or occasional, regular basis.
Small business developments were acceptable to a majority (44%) of the questionnaire respondents
and proposals for new bed and breakfasts, guesthouses and conversions will be supported where
the proposals are of an appropriate scale and character within the context of the immediate
surroundings (consistent with the Compton Bassett Design Statement) and the settlement as a
whole, in line with Wiltshire’s Core Policy 40 and which are likely to have a positive impact on
tourism and related economic activity within a sustainable context. More facilities are likely to be
required for Compton Bassett as a working village to accommodate and entertain visitors so the
CBNP strikes a reasonable balance to prevent damage to heritage, biodiversity, agriculture, land/soil
and visual amenity.
The limited business developments are unlikely to have any significant on the WHS sites at Avebury
(5 miles away) and Stonehenge (20 miles away) and the English Heritage “Assets at Risk”, which
consists of an aircraft hangar at Yatesbury (3 miles away).
Unrestricted large business development
Unrestricted large scale business development (including quarrying) would be likely to have an
unacceptable and harmful effect on heritage, landscape, land and soil resources and transport, due
to increased vehicle movements, particularly if HGVs were involved. This would be detrimental to
the health and well-being of the community. In addition, this policy could lead to greenfield
developments which could potentially damage the biodiversity, air quality and flood risk.
However, this policy might lead to benefits in terms of demographics, employment, improved
broadband/mobile services and an increase in renewable energy, albeit this last benefit might be at
the expense of the local green space, AONB and visual amenity.
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Compton Bassett Strategic Environmental Assessment
Objective
9
Policy
Proposals involving up to 7
Delivery of a high quality housing growth additional affordable homes for local
strategy tailored to the needs and context of people will be supported over the
Compton Bassett
period 2015 to 2030, providing they
are fully compliant with the Compton
Bassett Design Statement. All
affordable housing will be subject to
a Section 106 legal agreement or
planning condition to ensure that it
remains an affordable dwelling for
local people in perpetuity.
Individual developments such as
conversion of existing buildings and
housing extensions will be allowed,
providing they are fully compliant
with the Compton Bassett Design
Statement.
The CBNP policy includes a development limitation of up to 7 high quality new dwellings in the
designated development area in the centre of the village at Briar Leaze which would not have any
significant effect on the heritage, the biodiversity, the landscape, the air quality, the water
resources, the land and soil resources, employment, education, housing, health, material assets and
renewable energy as the development (up to 7 dwellings subject to an comprehensive Design
Statement) is a small, localised development within a previously consented development envelope
of 20 dwellings.
This policy is consistent with the Wiltshire Core Strategy which proposes up to 40 dwellings in the 6
parishes in the Calne area.
The CBNP development limitation will have a positive effect on demographics as the existing
population of around 200 could cope with an influx of some 30 individuals (15% increase in total
village population). Furthermore, as the new developments will be required to have good broadband
connection, an improved broadband service should also be available to adjacent properties which
currently have no broadband or poor (<2 Mbps) broadband services.
The limited housing development (up to 7 dwellings) are unlikely to have any significant on the WHS
sites at Avebury (5 miles away) and Stonehenge (20 miles away) and the English Heritage “Assets at
Risk”, which consists of an aircraft hangar at Yatesbury (3 miles away). For example, any additional
traffic along the A4 past Yatesbury would be around 20 car movements per day compared to over
13,000 other daily car movements along the A4 (Wiltshire Council Traffic data).
Unrestricted development & in-filling
In contrast, the alternative of significant unrestricted development and significant in-filling would
have a major detrimental effect on Compton Bassett with the only potential positive effect probably
being on the demographics. The unacceptable effects for an increase of around 50+ dwellings would
mean that the current population of ~200 would nearly double. This would be unacceptable and
create harmful effects to the heritage, landscape and transport together with a number of uncertain
but probably negative effects, including acute, short term construction effects.
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Compton Bassett Strategic Environmental Assessment
Objective
Policy
Development
proposals
which
Protection of rural landscape, AONB, visual protect the rural landscape, AONB,
amenity, local green space & air quality
local green space and air quality will
10
be supported, providing they are
fully compliant with the Compton
Bassett Design Statement.
The CBNP policy provides additional protection for the rural landscape, AONB, local green space and
air quality which are essential to the well-being of the local community as well as being the key to
future economic activity from tourism.
The community wants to see a responsible balance between necessary human activity and the rural
landscape, particularly the AONB and local green space. Air quality is a problem due to waste tip
developments at Lower Compton which border on the designated area and the AONB. Hence
developers will be required to protect and enrich the rural landscape and AONB, where possible in
compliance with the Compton Bassett Design Statement.
No protection of landscape, AONB & visual amenity
This policy provides no additional protection but protection would still be afforded for the AONB
from Wiltshire policies. However, there would be an increased risk to the landscape and local green
space which would potentially endanger the visual amenity and health and well-being of the
community. In addition, the areas outside the AONB and conservation area would be largely
unprotected but which are sufficiently close to cause concerns over the adjacent AONB and local
green space which are a core feature of the CBNP.
This might also encourage further waste tip developments which could potentially adversely affect
the Compton Bassett air quality.
However, the policy would make it easier for housing development on local green space and green
field areas outside the AONB.
No protection of local green space
This policy provides no additional protection for local green space but protection would still be
afforded from Wiltshire policies. However, there would be an increased risk of development of the
local green space which would potentially endanger the visual amenity and health and well-being of
the community.
However, the policy would make it easier for housing development on local green space and green
field areas outside the AONB.
No protection of air quality
This policy increases the risk of a deterioration of air quality from unrestricted developments within
the designated area and from developments close to the designated area such as the Lower
Compton landfill or a local waste to energy power station. Any deterioration in air quality also
increases the risk of health issues, depending on the type and concentration of air pollutant.
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Compton Bassett Strategic Environmental Assessment
Objective
Policy
Development
proposals
which
protect the land and soil resources
11 Protection of land and soil resources
will be supported, providing they are
fully compliant with the Compton
Bassett Design Statement.
The CBNP policy protects land and soil resources in Compton Bassett which are managed by a variety
of agri-management schemes for arable farming, dairy farming, rare breed pig farming, rare breed
sheep farming and woodland management. Land management is carried out at both entry level and
higher level stewardship which contains a number of restrictions on land and soil usage which are
re-enforced by the CBNP policy.
The land is classified as greenbelt agricultural land (Grade 2 – best and Grade 3 – most versatile with
the exception of the small brownfield development area in the centre of the village. This type of
land is considered to be important by Natural England and needs additional protection.
This provides a complementary level of protection for the biodiversity, landscape, AONB and visual
amenity which underpins Compton Bassett rural life and the community sense of well-being.
No protection of land & soil resources
This policy provides no additional protection (other than that afforded by Wiltshire policies) and
increases the risk of developments which damage the land and soil resources. A loss of protection
could potentially increase the risks to biodiversity, landscape, AONB and visual amenity which
underpins Compton Bassett rural life and the community sense of well-being, and might increase the
potential for unrestricted development of solar panel renewable energy schemes.
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Compton Bassett Strategic Environmental Assessment
Sustainability Assessment
No protection of land & soil resources
11. Land & soil Resources
No protection of air quality
No protection of local green space
No protection of landscape, AONB & visual
amenity
10. Landscape, AONB, Visual Amenity, Green Space
& Air Quality
Unrestricted development & in-filling
Alternatives
9. Housing Growth Strategy
And
Unrestricted large business development
CBNP Policies 8-11
8. Local Economic Activity
Of
Baseline - No change
Impact
Alternative Policies
Heritage
Biodiversity
Landscape - AONB
Air Quality & Pollution
Water, Climate Change & Flood Risk
Land & Soil Resources
Human Population - demographics
Human Population - employment
Human Population - education
Human Population - housing
Human Population - health
Infrastructure - Transport
Infrastructure - Material Assets
Infrastructure - Broadband Service
Infrastructure - Mobile Service
Infrastructure - Waste
Infrastructure - Renewable Energy
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Compton Bassett Strategic Environmental Assessment
Chapter 5. Consideration of Cumulative Effects
The Compton Bassett Neighbourhood Plan is expected to have positive benefits for the local
community in terms of making Compton Bassett “a better place to live” by improving and sustaining
the overall quality of life in terms of economic prosperity, local infrastructure, well-being, social
vitality and access to affordable housing.
Most of the cumulative effects are relatively minimal and beneficial as the policies are designed to be
homogeneous, self-consistent and self-re-enforcing, providing a reasonable between “preservation”
and the amount of “change” which can be accommodated by a small community of around 200
individuals
The proposed development in the Plan is relatively modest and on a small scale so that any individual
impacts and cumulative impacts are relatively low but do allow Compton Bassett to develop and
move forwards whilst preserving the best aspects of village life without prejudice to future
development options.
The potential limited negative effects can be mitigated to some extent over time by:
Technique
Development Location Selection
Replacement and change of use
Technology Advances
Behaviour Modification
Mitigation
Future development can be restricted to the least sensitive
locations within the village, such as the available brownfield
land and in the remaining land within the Compton Bassett
designated area but located outside the AONB and
conservation area.
Any loss of habitat or green space could be replaced by an
equivalent area within the Compton Bassett designated area.
Various small green space areas within the Compton Bassett
designated but outside the AONB and which are “un-used”
could be re-developed via a change of use to allotments,
preserving the green space and benefiting local residents.
Improvements in technology will result in improved
communication (broadband and mobile phone technology)
which will reduce the need to travel and encourage economic
development within Compton Bassett.
Increased, appropriate use of sustainable construction and
renewables will mitigate negative impacts on climate change
Compton Bassett residents could themselves reduce negative
impacts by improving sustainable transport (particularly if
broadband was available throughout the village), by growing
food on appropriate garden space and allotments, by
increased re-cycling, increased use of renewable energy and
better home insulation, drainage ditch clearance, awareness
and support of habitat and wild life sensitivities, sustainable
development for conversions/extensions (consistent with the
Compton Bassett Design Statement and increased use of
organic farming/gardening methods.
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Compton Bassett Strategic Environmental Assessment
Chapter 6. Monitoring
The effects of the CBNP will be monitored by the Compton Bassett Parish Council using the indicators
described in the Sustainability Assessment Framework.
This includes all losses of landscape, character, visual amenity, assets of community value,
biodiversity, green space, rights of way. In addition, monitoring arrangements would also include
inappropriate housing developments, poor air quality, increased traffic, increased speeding traffic,
damage to verges etc., together with the number of flooded properties per year, the number of
appropriate small scale business development, the quality of the broadband service, the quality of
the mobile service and renewable energy usage within the designated area.
Sustainability
Topic
Heritage
Biodiversity
Landscape
Sustainability Appraisal
CBNP Objectives
Objective 7: Preserve the
character of Compton
Bassett, conservation area,
historic buildings and
historic rights of way
Objective 4: Sensitive
Development which
protects and enriches the
habitat and biodiversity of
Compton Bassett
Objective 10: Protection of
rural landscape, AONB,
visual amenity, local green
space & air quality
Sustainability Appraisal
CBNP Policies
CBNPP 7: Proposals for
development
should
preserve the character of
Compton
Bassett,
conservation area, historic
buildings and historic rights
of way and be fully
compliant
with
the
Compton Bassett Design
Statement
CBNPP 4: Proposals for
development which protect
and enrich the habitat and
biodiversity of Compton
Bassett will be supported,
providing they are fully
compliant with the
Compton Bassett Design
Statement
CBNPP 10: Development
proposals which protect the
rural landscape, AONB,
visual amenity, local green
space & air quality will be
supported, providing they
are fully compliant with the
Compton Bassett Design
Statement
Potential Indicators
Loss of historic
character, listed
buildings and assets
of community value
& historic rights of
way
No damage to
Avebury,
Stonehenge or
Yatesbury
Loss of habitat and
biodiversity
Damage to rural
landscape
Damage to AONB
Loss of visual
amenity
Damage/loss of
local green space
Large scale in-filling
Objective 10: Protection of
rural landscape, AONB,
Poor air quality
CBNPP 10: Development Poor air quality
proposals which protect the
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Compton Bassett Strategic Environmental Assessment
Air Quality and
Environmental
Pollution
visual amenity, local green
space & air quality
Objective 5: Encourage
recycling, minimisation of
the carbon footprint and the
increased use of renewable
energy within the Parish
Water
Resources,
Climate
Change and
Flood Risk
rural landscape, AONB,
visual amenity, local green
space & air quality will be
supported, providing they
are fully compliant with the
Compton Bassett Design
Statement
CBNPP 5: Proposals for
development
should
encourage
re-cycling,
minimisation of the carbon
footprint and the increased
use of renewable energy
within the Parish, and be
fully compliant with the
Compton Bassett Design
Statement.
Proposals for wind turbines,
biomass
generators,
anaerobic digestion plants
and other energy from
waste technologies will not
be supported as they are
incompatible with Compton
Bassett’s Conservation Area
status and the proximity of
the AONB.
Objective 5: Encourage
CBNPP 5: Proposals for
recycling, minimisation of
development should
the carbon footprint and the encourage re-cycling,
increased use of renewable minimisation of the carbon
energy within the Parish
footprint and the increased
use of renewable energy
within the Parish, and be
fully compliant with the
Compton Bassett Design
Statement.
Proposals for wind turbines,
biomass
generators,
anaerobic digestion plants
and other energy from
waste technologies will not
be supported as they are
incompatible with Compton
Bassett’s Conservation Area
status and the proximity of
the AONB.
Nauseous smells
from local landfill
Low use of
renewable energy
Extension of landfill
beyond temporary
permission to 2022
Number of houses
meeting the
BREEAM standard
for sustainable
homes
Increased traffic
pollution
Number of flooded
properties per year
Amount of raw
sewage release
Adequate sewage
disposal for
developments
Unsustainable
developments and
developments in
flood zones
Low use of
renewable energy
Number of houses
not meeting the
BREEAM standard
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Compton Bassett Strategic Environmental Assessment
for sustainable
homes
Objective 6: Minimise the
environmental impact of
climate change on water
resources and flood risk
where possible
Land and Soil
Resources
Human
Population
Objective 11: Protection of
land and soil resources
Objective 8: Strengthen and
support local economic
activity
demographics,
employment,
education,
housing &
health
CBNPP 6: Proposals for
development
should
minimise the environmental
impact of climate change on
water resources and flood
risk where possible and be
fully compliant with the
Compton Bassett Design
Statement.
CNBPP 11: Development
Loss of soil quality
proposals which protect
land and soil resources will
Developments on
be supported, providing
agricultural land
they are fully compliant
with the Compton Bassett
Design Statement.
CBNPP 8: Development
proposals which strengthen
and support local economic
activity will be supported,
providing they are fully
compliant with Compton
Bassett Neighbourhood Plan
policies and the Compton
Bassett Design Statement.
The conversion of existing
buildings and small scale
expansion of existing
employment premises will
be supported, providing
they are fully compliant
with the Compton Bassett
Design Statement.
Development proposals
which promote or provide
broadband and high speed
broadband services will be
supported, providing they
are fully compliant with the
Compton Bassett Design
Statement.
Objective 2: Maintain and
Improve Local Services for
Existing & New Residents
CBNPP 2: Proposals for
development will be
required to identify their
likely impact on local
Appropriate small
scale local business
development
Appropriate local
housing
development which
conforms to the
Compton Bassett
Neighbourhood
Plan and design
statement
Loss of access to
education facilities
and local health
care through poor
broadband service
Loss of local
services such as
buses and
broadband
Number of houses
not meeting the
BREEAM standard
for sustainable
homes
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Compton Bassett Strategic Environmental Assessment
infrastructure, services and
facilities and to
demonstrate how any such
impacts will be addressed,
including cumulative
impacts.
Developments which
maintain and improve local
services will be supported
providing they are fully
compliant with the
Compton Bassett Design
Statement.
Objective 9: Delivery of a
high quality housing growth
strategy tailored to the
needs and context of
Compton Bassett
CBNPP
9:
Proposals
involving up to 7 additional
affordable homes for local
people will be supported
over the period 2015 to
2030, providing they are
fully compliant with the
Compton Bassett Design
Statement.
Appropriate
number of
developments for
affordable homes
for local people
Housing
conversions and
extensions which
do not conform to
BREEAM and CABE
standards
Developments
which reduce the
sense of
community wellbeing
Individual
developments
such as conversion of
existing
buildings
and
housing extensions will be
allowed, providing they are
fully compliant with the
Compton Bassett Design
Statement.
Objective 10: Protection of
local green space,
conservation area, AONB,
landscape, air quality and
existing buildings
Objective 3: Improve traffic
safety and transport
services
CBNPP 10: Development
proposals which protect the
rural landscape, AONB,
visual amenity, local green
space & air quality will be
supported, providing they
are fully compliant with the
Compton Bassett Design
Statement
CBNPP 3: Developments
which maintain and
improve traffic safety and
transport services will be
supported providing they
are fully compliant with the
Compton Bassett Design
Statement.
Increased HGV &
car traffic &
damage to verges,
drainage ditches,
pavements etc
Accidents to
pedestrians, dog
walkers, horse
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Compton Bassett Strategic Environmental Assessment
Developments should
identify the realistic level of
traffic it is likely to generate
and assess the potential
impact on pedestrians,
cyclists, horse riders, dog
walkers, road safety,
parking and congestion
within the Parish and
include appropriate
mitigation measures.
Infrastructure
Transport,
Material
Assets,
Broadband,
Waste
and
Renewable
Energy
Developments which would
cause unacceptable highway
dangers will not be
permitted.
Objective 1: Maintain and
Improve Assets of
Community Value
Objective 2: Maintain and
Improve Local Services for
Existing & New Residents
CBNPP 1: Development will
be supported where it is
sympathetic to, maintains
and improves the local
character, historic and
natural assets of community
value, providing it is fully
compliant with the
Compton Bassett Design
Statement.
CBNPP 2: Proposals for
development will be
required to identify their
likely impact on local
infrastructure, services and
facilities and to
demonstrate how any such
impacts will be addressed,
including cumulative
impacts.
Developments which
maintain and improve local
services will be supported
providing they are fully
compliant with the
Compton Bassett Design
Statement.
riders
Car accidents
HGVs getting stuck
HGVs over 7.5te
passing through the
village
Loss of service
Speedwatch data
showing speed
increases
Reduction in home
working
Closure of Village
Hall
Degradation of
grade I & II assets
Loss of key village
amenity
Continuation of no
broadband service
or very poor
broadband service
Solar panels in
AONB
Low use of
renewable energy
Low recycling rates
Objective 5: Encourage
CBNPP 5: Proposals for
recycling, minimisation of
the carbon footprint and the development should
increased use of renewable encourage re-cycling,
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Compton Bassett Strategic Environmental Assessment
energy within the Parish
minimisation of the carbon
footprint and the increased
use of renewable energy
within the Parish, and be
fully compliant with the
Compton Bassett Design
Statement.
Proposals for wind turbines,
biomass
generators,
anaerobic digestion plants
and other energy from
waste technologies will not
be supported as they are
incompatible with Compton
Bassett’s Conservation Area
status and the proximity of
the AONB.
Chapter 7. Conclusions
The Sustainability Assessment has determined the likely effects of implementing the Compton
Bassett Neighbour Plan and significant effects have been found in a number of areas. As a result the
Compton Bassett Neighbourhood Plan has been slightly revised and clarified in line with comments
from Natural England, English Heritage and the Environment Agency. A number of comments from
Wiltshire Council have also been incorporated where appropriate.
It has been shown that the sustainability assessment framework can be used to identify the potential
adverse impacts of future developments so that they can be reduced and/or mitigated, particularly
by promoting the use of brownfield sites within the Compton Bassett designated area.
This will be of significant benefit to the Compton Bassett Parish Council, Wiltshire Council and
individuals who might be affected by any future proposed development.
Chapter 8. Next Steps
The Sustainability Assessment report will be formally submitted to Wiltshire Council alongside the
slightly modified Compton Bassett Neighbourhood Plan so that they can facilitate the formal public
consultation of the Plan before submitting it to the independent planning inspector for statutory
examination so that the soundness of the Plan and its supporting evidence base can be determined.
It is possible that the consultation and examination process might require further modifications to
the Sustainability Assessment report and corresponding modifications to the Compton Bassett
Neighbourhood Plan before it can be adopted and “made”.
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Compton Bassett Strategic Environmental Assessment
Appendix 1
SEA Quality Assurance Checklist
The Quality assurance check list below has been used to ensure that the requirements of the SEA
Directive have been met and fully integrated into the sustainability process covered in this document
and covers the technical and procedural steps of the sustainability assessment process.
SEA Directive Requirements
Objectives & Context
The purpose and objectives are explained
Sustainability issues including international and EU objectives are
considered in developing objectives and targets
SA objectives are identified and linked to indicators/targets as appropriate
Conflicts that exist between SA objectives and other plan objectives are
identified and described
Scoping
The environmental consultation bodies are consulted
The assessment focusses on key issues
Technical procedural and other difficulties are discussed and assumptions
and uncertainties are explained as appropriate
Options/Alternatives Considered
Compliance
Yes – Chapter 1
Yes
Steps A1 to A3
Yes - Step A4
Conflicts between
Heritage & Landscape
were identified by the
Statutory Consultees
and eliminated
Yes – Appendix 3
Yes - Steps A1 to A3
Yes – SA report &
Consultation
Statement
Realistic alternatives are considered
Alternatives include “baseline” case
Sustainability effects are identified
Inconsistencies are identified
Yes – Step A5
Yes – Step A5
Yes – Step A5
Yes – Step A5
Relevant aspects of the current environment are provided and considered
against the “baseline” case
Characteristics of the designated area likely to be affected are described
Difficulties such as deficiencies in information are explained
Yes – Step A2
Likely significant social, economic and environmental effects are identified
including biodiversity, population, human health, flora, fauna, soil, water,
air, climate, material assets, heritage and landscape
Yes – Step A5
Measures to prevent &reduce any significant adverse effects are considered
Development issues are considered
Yes – Chapter 5
Yes – Chapter 5
Baseline Information
Prediction & Evaluation of significant effects
Mitigation Measures
The Sustainability Assessment Report
Uses simple language and uses maps/illustrations as appropriate
Explains who were consulted, how and when
Yes – Step A2
Yes – Step A2
Yes – SA Report
Yes – SA Report &
Consultation
Statement
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Compton Bassett Strategic Environmental Assessment
Identifies key sources of information
Consultation
Statutory consultation bodies, other consultees and the public consulted
Decision Making & Information
Yes - SA
Yes – Appendix 3
& Consultation
Statement
The Sustainability Assessment has been integrated into the Plan
Yes - CBNP
Monitoring measures have been proposed and will be implemented
Yes - CBNP
Monitoring Measures
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Compton Bassett Strategic Environmental Assessment
Appendix 2
Habitats Regulations Assessment
European Directive 92/43/EEC relating to the conservation of Natural Habitats and of Wild Fauna and
Flora (the Habitats Directive) requires a Habitats Regulation Assessment (HRA) to be undertaken
conforming to the UK Habitats Directive via the Conservation and Species Regulations 2010. The
HRA assesses any impact against the conservation objectives of sites of European importance for
nature conservation to determine any likely adverse effects.
Natura 2000 is the European Union network of protected areas which are recognised as sites of EU
importance under the EU Habitats Directive 92/43/EEC on the conservation of natural habitats and
of wild flora and fauna and include Special Areas of Conservation (SACs) and Special Protection Areas
(SPAs).
The purpose of the HRA is to ensure that the integrity of European sites is protected at the national,
regional and local level.
European Directive 92/43/EEC, Article 6(3) states that “Any plan or project not directly connected
with or necessary to the management of the site but likely to have significant effect thereon, either
individually or in combination with other plans or projects, shall be subject to appropriate
assessment of its implications for the site in view of the site’s conservation objectives.”
The relevant Natura 2000 sites within Wiltshire are as follows: 1. Salisbury Plain (SAC & SPA); 2. Bath
& Bradford on Avon (SAC); 3. Pewsey Downs (SAC); 4. North Meadows & Clattinger Farm (SAC); 5.
River Avon (SAC); 6. Porton Down (SPA); and 7. Rodborough Common (SAC).
The key potential environmental issues are Recreation (Sites 1 & 3); Hydrology/Hydrogeology (Sites
1-5); Nitrogen Deposition (Sites 1 & 4-7); Physical Damage/Interruption of Flight Lines (Site 2).
The Wiltshire HRA assessment in the Wiltshire Core Strategy shows the following assessment for the
Calne area which contains the Compton Bassett Neighbourhood Plan development area:
Rodborough
Commn
Porton
Down
River Avon
North
Meadows
Pewsey
Downs
Bath
&
Bradford on
Avon
Salisbury
Plain
Calne Area
Recreation
Hydrology/Hydrogeology
H1
H1
H1
H1
H1
Nitrogen Deposition
Physical Damage
Interruption of Flight Lines
Key: Red = environmental issue requires assessment; Green = environmental issue does not apply
H1 = the Compton Bassett development area is within the Wessex Water Northern Resource Zone
The draft policies of the Compton Bassett Neighbourhood Plan have been screened against the
potential environmental issues relating to each of the relevant Natura 2000 sites.
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Compton Bassett Strategic Environmental Assessment
Recreation: The Compton Bassett Development Area is not within 15km Sites 1, 2, 4-7, so that, taken
with the small scale of the Compton Bassett development (up to 7 houses), it can be concluded that
the Compton Bassett Neighbourhood Plan would not have any significant environmental impact. As
part of the North Wessex Downs AONB, Pewsey Downs attracts large numbers of visitors every year
and the North Wessex Downs AONB has a management plan which provides a basis for managing the
environmental impacts. The Compton Bassett Neighbourhood Plan designated area is not within
5km of the SAC and is only just within 15km of the SAC. Consequently, the small scale of the
proposed development (up to 7 new houses) would be likely to have a “de minimus” effect on the
AONB. In addition, the issues relating to additional recreational pressure as a result of residential
development growth are dealt with in Core Policy 50 of the Wiltshire Core Strategy and Natural
England have agreed that the levels of housing proposed within the Wiltshire Core Strategy (and the
Calne Area Strategy which encompasses Compton Bassett) fall within the scope of the Wiltshire Core
Strategy HRA and would not be likely to have any significant effect on the Pewsey Downs SAC.
Hydrology/Hydrogeology, Water Resource: The very limited amount of development proposed by
the Compton Bassett Neighbourhood Plan will be easily accommodated by the current abstraction
license levels which have undergone HRA by the Environment Agency as has Wessex Water’s Water
Resource Management Plan and would not be likely to have any significant effect.
Hydrology/Hydrogeology, Water Quality: The proposed development is not within 15km of most of
the SACs and only just within 15km of the Pewsey Downs SAC and the small scale of the proposed
development (up to 7 new houses) would be likely to have a “de minimus” effect. Water quality is
dealt with in Core Policy 50 of the Wiltshire Core Strategy which has been addressed in the emerging
Compton Bassett Neighbourhood Plan.
Nitrogen Deposition: The effect on Natura 2000 sites, as identified in the Wiltshire Core Strategy
HRA has been considered and the small scale of the proposed development (up to 7 new houses)
would be likely to have a “de minimus” effect making it unlikely that any significant impact (or any
impact) would occur as a result of the implementation of the Compton Bassett Neighbourhood Plan.
Physical Damage/Interruption of Flight Lines: The Compton Bassett Neighbourhood Plan designated
area is sufficiently far from Bath (30 km) and Bradford on Avon (24 km) that the SAC there would be
no physical damage or interruption of flight lines.
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Compton Bassett Strategic Environmental Assessment
Screening of Emerging Compton Bassett Neighbourhood Plan Policies
The objectives and policies of the Compton Bassett Neighbourhood Plan are:
1
2
3
Objective
Policy
Development will be supported where it
Maintain and improve assets of community is sympathetic to, maintains and
value
improves the local character, historic
and natural assets of community value,
providing it is fully compliant with the
Compton Bassett Design Statement.
Proposals for development will be
Maintain and improve local services for required to identify their likely
existing and new residents
impact on local infrastructure,
services and facilities and to
demonstrate how any such impacts
will be addressed, including
cumulative impacts.
Improve traffic safety and transport services
Developments which maintain and
improve local services will be
supported providing they are fully
compliant with the Compton Bassett
Design Statement.
Developments which maintain and
improve traffic safety and transport
services will be supported providing
they are fully compliant with the
Compton Bassett Design Statement.
Developments should identify the
realistic level of traffic it is likely to
generate and assess the potential
impact on pedestrians, cyclists, horse
riders, dog walkers, road safety,
parking and congestion within the
Parish and include appropriate
mitigation measures.
4
5
Sensitive development which protects and
enriches the habitat and biodiversity of
Compton Bassett
Encourage re-cycling, minimisation of the
carbon footprint and the increased use of
renewable energy within the Parish
Developments which would cause
unacceptable highway dangers will
not be permitted.
Proposals for development which
protect and enrich the habitat and
biodiversity of Compton Bassett will
be supported, providing they are
fully compliant with the Compton
Bassett Design Statement.
Proposals for development should
encourage re-cycling, minimisation
of the carbon footprint and the
increased use of renewable energy
within the Parish, and be fully
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Compton Bassett Strategic Environmental Assessment
compliant with the Compton Bassett
Design Statement.
6
7
8
Minimise the environmental impact of climate
change on water resources and flood risk
where possible
Preserve the character of Compton Bassett,
conservation area, historic buildings and
historic rights of way
Strengthen
activity
and
support
local
economic
Proposals for wind turbines, biomass
generators, anaerobic digestion
plants and other energy from waste
technologies will not be supported as
they are incompatible with Compton
Bassett’s Conservation Area status
and the proximity of the AONB.
Proposals for development should
minimise the environmental impact
of climate change on water
resources and flood risk where
possible and be fully compliant with
the
Compton
Bassett
Design
Statement.
Proposals for development should
preserve the character of Compton
Bassett, conservation area, historic
buildings and historic rights of way
and be fully compliant with the
Compton Bassett Design Statement.
Development proposals which
strengthen and support local
economic activity will be supported,
providing they are fully compliant
with Compton Bassett
Neighbourhood Plan policies and the
Compton Bassett Design Statement.
The conversion of existing buildings
and small scale expansion of existing
employment premises will be
supported, providing they are fully
compliant with the Compton Bassett
Design Statement.
9
Development proposals which
promote or provide broadband and
high speed broadband services will
be supported, providing they are
fully compliant with the Compton
Bassett Design Statement.
Proposals involving up to 7
Delivery of a high quality housing growth additional affordable homes for local
strategy tailored to the needs and context of people will be supported over the
Compton Bassett
period 2015 to 2030, providing they
are fully compliant with the Compton
Bassett Design Statement. All
affordable housing will be subject to
a Section 106 legal agreement or
planning condition to ensure that it
remains an affordable dwelling for
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Compton Bassett Strategic Environmental Assessment
local people in perpetuity.
Individual developments such as
conversion of existing buildings and
housing extensions will be allowed,
providing they are fully compliant
with the Compton Bassett Design
Statement.
10
Development
proposals
which
Protection of rural landscape, AONB, visual protect the rural landscape, AONB,
amenity, local green space & air quality
local green space and air quality will
be supported, providing they are
fully compliant with the Compton
Bassett Design Statement.
11
Development
proposals
which
Protection of land and soil resources
protect the land and soil resources
will be supported, providing they are
fully compliant with the Compton
Bassett Design Statement.
The effect of the policies have been considered individually and in combination and the effects of the
whole plan in relation to the Wiltshire Core Strategy have been examined against the screening
criteria developed Natural England, so that there is an evidenced audit trail. This process identified
the need for some minor policy re-wording and emphasis and a new policy (Policy 11) relating to the
protection of Land and Soil Resources.
The criteria used were as follows:
Category
A1
A2
A3
A4
A5
B
C
D
Criterion
The policy will not itself lead to development e.g. because it relates to design or other
qualitative criteria
The policy is intended to protect the natural environment
The policy is intended to conserve or enhance the natural, built or historic environment
The policy would positively steer development away from European sites and associated
sensitive areas
The policy would have no effect because no development could occur through the policy
itself, the development being implemented through later policies in the same plan,
which are more specific and therefore more appropriate to assess for their effects on
European sites and associated sensitive areas
No significant effect
Likely significant effect alone
Likely significant effects in combination
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Compton Bassett Strategic Environmental Assessment
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
Policy
Development will be supported where it is sympathetic to, maintains and
improves the local character, historic and natural assets of community
value, providing it is fully compliant with the Compton Bassett Design
Statement.
Proposals for development will be required to identify their likely
impact on local infrastructure, services and facilities and to
demonstrate how any such impacts will be addressed, including
cumulative impacts.
Developments which maintain and improve local services will be
supported providing they are fully compliant with the Compton
Bassett Design Statement.
Developments which maintain and improve traffic safety and
transport services will be supported providing they are fully
compliant with the Compton Bassett Design Statement.
Natural England
Criterion
A1
A3
A1
A1
A3
A1
Developments should identify the realistic level of traffic it is likely
to generate and assess the potential impact on pedestrians, cyclists,
horse riders, dog walkers, road safety, parking and congestion
within the Parish and include appropriate mitigation measures.
A1
A2
Developments which would cause unacceptable highway dangers
will not be permitted.
Proposals for development which protect and enrich the habitat
and biodiversity of Compton Bassett will be supported, providing
they are fully compliant with the Compton Bassett Design
Statement.
Proposals for development should minimise the environmental
impact of climate change where possible and be fully compliant
with the Compton Bassett Design Statement.
Proposals for development should minimise the environmental
impact of climate change on water resources and flood risk where
possible and be fully compliant with the Compton Bassett Design
Statement.
Proposals for development should preserve the character of
Compton Bassett, conservation area, historic buildings and historic
rights of way and be fully compliant with the Compton Bassett
Design Statement.
Development proposals which strengthen and support local
economic activity will be supported, providing they are fully
compliant with Compton Bassett Neighbourhood Plan policies and
the Compton Bassett Design Statement.
A1
A1
A1
A3
A1
A1
A3
A1
The conversion of existing buildings and small scale expansion of
existing employment premises will be supported, providing they
are fully compliant with the Compton Bassett Design Statement.
A1
B
Development proposals which promote or provide broadband and
high speed broadband services will be supported, providing they
are fully compliant with the Compton Bassett Design Statement.
Proposals involving up to 7 additional affordable homes for local
A1
A5
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Compton Bassett Strategic Environmental Assessment
people will be supported over the period 2015 to 2030, providing
they are fully compliant with the Compton Bassett Design
Statement. All affordable housing will be subject to a Section 106
legal agreement or planning condition to ensure that it remains an
affordable dwelling for local people in perpetuity.
Individual developments such as conversion of existing buildings
and housing extensions will be allowed, providing they are fully
compliant with the Compton Bassett Design Statement.
10 Development proposals which protect the rural landscape, AONB,
local green space and air quality will be supported, providing they
are fully compliant with the Compton Bassett Design Statement.
11 Development proposals which protect the land and soil resources
will be supported, providing they are fully compliant with the
Compton Bassett Design Statement.
B
A1
A1
A2
A3
A1
A2
A3
The Compton Bassett Neighbourhood Plan policies would not have any effect in combination and, as
the policies are entirely consistent with the Wiltshire Core Strategy there would not be any
combination effects with the Wiltshire Core Strategy.
HRA Assessment Conclusion
The only site allocated for limited development in the Compton Bassett Neighbourhood Plan is
within a previously consented development area and would be expected to have a “de minimis”
effect on Natura 2000 sites in Wiltshire due to the distance from each site and the small scale of the
proposed development.
It is therefore concluded that the Compton Bassett Neighbourhood Plan and its associated policies
would have no likely significant effects on the Natura 2000 sites in Wiltshire either individually or in
combination.
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Compton Bassett Strategic Environmental Assessment
Appendix 3
Statutory Consultee Comments on Compton Bassett Scoping Report
Sustainability Assessment
English Heritage
English Heritage Comments on Scoping Report
We have only a few observations to make and these can be
summarised as follows:
The report does not set out why an SEA is required, which would be
useful as a steer so we as consultees will know whether the relevant
issues are ones relating to our statutory interests. But a parallel
consultation from Wiltshire Council on their SEA Screening
Determination highlights that they have advised that an SEA will be
required due to the housing proposals within the emerging
Neighbourhood Plan which are likely to impact upon the Conservation
Area and Stonehenge and Avebury World Heritage Site (WHS) as
designated heritage assets. The proposals may well impact on other as
yet unidentified heritage assets also.
It is therefore important that the Scoping exercise identifies all relevant
heritage assets together with an understanding of their significance so
that a comprehensive impact assessment and options evaluation can
take place. The Review of (Heritage) Baseline Information on pp21 &
22 of the Scoping Report provides a useful overview of the heritage
character of the Plan area but does not mention the WHS. It might also
be useful to schedule the designated heritage assets and those which
may be on the national Heritage At Risk Register, information which
can be found via your Historic Environment Record.
The section on Heritage also seems to confuse Areas of Outstanding
Natural Beauty and Conservation Areas: the former is not a heritage
designation and so might more rightly be considered in the section on
Nature Conservation; and Conservation Areas are heritage
designations so would more accurately be located in the heritage
section.
Action Taken
Details have been added
to the Executive Summary
and Introduction of the
Scoping Report and the
Sustainability Assessment.
Assessments of the likely
environmental impacts on
Avebury and Stonehenge
have been included in the
Scoping Report SA! Table
and the Sustainability
Assessment.
Avebury and Stonehenge
(World Heritage Sites)
have been included in the
Scoping Report SA! Table
and the Sustainability
Assessment. These are
located 5 miles and 20
miles respectively from the
Compton
Bassett
designated area and the
environmental impact of
up to 7 additional houses
is judged to be “de
minimis”.
A review of the English
Heritage “Assets at Risk
Register” has also been
included in both the
Scoping Report and the
Sustainability Assessment.
AONB has been removed
from Heritage and is now
included under Landscape.
The
Scoping
Report,
Sustainability Assessment
and the Neighbourhood
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Compton Bassett Strategic Environmental Assessment
Otherwise, there appears to be no reference in Section A1 to the
National Planning Policy Framework and the policy provisions relevant
to the locally determined issues on p7.
Guidance on the provision of Heritage within scoping and SEA exercises
can be found on our website at http://www.englishheritage.org.uk/publications/strategic-environ-assessmentsustainability-appraisal-historic-environment/. I have also attached a
generic template letter which sets out in more detail how heritage can
be accommodated within SEA exercises and includes a list of additional
information sources.
The emerging Plan itself is good generally at identifying and promoting
the protection and enhancement of the area’s distinctive heritage and
those provisions are welcome. In terms of specific provision for
development, it is not clear from the Plan how the “Development
Area” within the Conservation Area as set out on p24 has been
designated and the basis upon which it has been determined that it is
capable of accommodating 7 additional properties. This allocation
needs to be assessed against the significance of the character and
appearance of the Conservation Area and other relevant heritage
assets as evidence to determine its suitability in principle, and if
deemed acceptable that information can then be used to define and
justify a brief for the site in terms of capacity, layout, design etc etc.
Plan have all been
modified accordingly.
A review of the National
Planning Policy Framework
has been added to the
Scoping
Report,
the
Sustainability Assessment
and the Neighbourhood
Plan.
The guidance has been
reviewed.
The Conservation Area was
designated
by
North
Wiltshire Council on 28
May
1991.
The
“Development
Area”
within the Conservation
Area was a pre-existing
designation by the existing
Statutory Body which is
presumed to be North
Wiltshire.
The allocation has been
revised downwards to up
to 7 additional properties
in the light of the adopted
Wiltshire Core Strategy (2
December 2012) and the
basis for the allocation has
been
assessed
(as
required). The details are
included in the Scoping
Report, the Sustainabilty
Report, the Sustainability
Assessment
and
the
Neighbourhood Plan
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Compton Bassett Strategic Environmental Assessment
Natural England
Natural England Comments on Scoping Report
Thank you for the above your consultation. Natural England is a nondepartmental public body. Our statutory purpose is to ensure that the
natural environment is conserved, enhanced, and managed for
the benefit of present and future generations, thereby contributing to
sustainable development.
Action Taken
Noted.
The area where we can contribute most in terms of advice is the
Sustainability Assessment Framework, and so have concentrated our
advice on this aspect of the report.
Noted.
AONB has been
removed from Heritage
and is now included
under Landscape with
additional emphasis in
the Scoping Report,
Sustainability
Assessment and the
Neighbourhood Plan.
For clarity, we advise that the objectives listed in the second column are
The relevant Table has
exclusive, that is to say, not covered in multiple rows. Doing this will make been modified as
it clearer when appraising, say, housing site options, where it will be clear
requested in the
where issues such as landscape are considered. At the moment, landscape Scoping Report and
is referred to under all bar one of the Sustainability Topics.
Sustainability
Assessment.
Under land and soil resources, we advise that protecting best and most
A new objective and
versatile soils should be an objective.
policy have been added
to the Scoping Report,
Sustainability
Assessment and
Neighbourhood Plan.
In other regards we advise that the SA framework appears to cover all other Noted
aspects of the natural environment satisfactorily.
In terms of our remit, the principle reason for requiring a Sustainability
Appraisal is the fact that much of the NDP area falls within the North
Wessex Downs AONB. We advise that the presence of this landscape
designation as a major environmental feature of the plan area is reflected in
the Sustainability Assessment Framework. Whilst there is a landscape
topic, the AONB designation is not specifically picked out as a factor to
consider, and we advise that it should be.
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Compton Bassett Strategic Environmental Assessment
Environment Agency
Environment Agency Comments on Scoping Report
“We have been consulted on the above document by Dr Peter Alberry of
Compton Bassett Parish Council (received 09 December 2014).
Action Taken
No action required
The report adequately covers all the environmental issues which fall
within our remit, therefore we have no comments to offer”.
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Compton Bassett Strategic Environmental Assessment
Wiltshire Council
Wiltshire Council Comments on Scoping Report
“The Sustainability Assessment contained in this document shows that
the proposed permitted development of up to 10 [now 7] houses in the
Compton Bassett Neighbourhood Plan area which “would not be likely
to have significant environmental effects” and where the potential
environmental impact would be further mitigated by the Compton
Bassett Design Statement”
Action Taken
Statement removed.
The Scoping Report and
Sustainability Assessment
refer to Wiltshire Council’s
screening opinion (see
Executive Summary and
Wiltshire Council: “This disagrees with the Screening Report. The LPA Introduction
of
each
has responsibility for deciding what this says - it is not for the NP to do document.
so.”
Add Chapter 5: SEA Framework Objectives
Chapter
Headings
removed.
Remove Chapter 6: Monitoring
Sustainability Assessment
Framework
Objectives
(including
the
SEA
requirements)
were
already included in the
original Scoping Report
and remain included under
Step A4 (see page 78) of
the
revised
Scoping
Report.
Chapter
Headings
removed.
Potential indicators remain
in
Sustainability
Assessment
Framework
Objectives (including the
SEA requirements) under
Step A4 (see page 78) of
the
revised
Scoping
Report.
Add Chapter 7: Next steps and consultation on this report
Section on Next Steps
added (see page 85) of
revised Scoping Report.
You need to explain why an SEA is required by quoting the screening The Scoping Report and
opinion. You cannot disagree in this document [SEA Scoping] with the Sustainability Assessment
Screening Opinion
refer to Wiltshire Council’s
screening opinion (see
Executive Summary and
Introduction
of
each
document).
SA Directive 2001/42/EC legal requirements: Setting the context and
The
original
Scoping
objectives, establishing the baseline and deciding on the scope.
Report contained a section
on Policy Context which
The environment Report shall include information on (inter alia):
reviewed the Wiltshire
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Compton Bassett Strategic Environmental Assessment
“The relationship (of the plan or programme) with other relevant plans
and programmes” (Annex 1a)
“The environment protection objectives, established at international,
European Community or national level. Which are relevant to the plans
or programme and the way those objectives and any environmental
considerations have been taken into account during its preparation”
(Annex 1e).
“Relevant aspects of the current state of the environment and the likely
evolution thereof without implementation of the plan or programmes”
and “the environmental characteristics of areas likely to be significantly
affected” Annex 1b and c)
“ Any existing environmental problems which are relevant to the plan or
programme including, in particular, those relating to any areas of
particular environmental importance, such as areas designated
pursuant to Directives 79/409/EEC and 92/43/EEC” (Annex 1 d)
“The authorities which, by reason of their environmental
responsibilities, are likely to be concerned by the environmental effects
of implementing plans or programmes, shall be consulted when
deciding on the scope and level of detail of the information which must
be included in the environmental report” (Article 5.4 and 6.3)
Core Strategy and the
Calne Area Strategy.
The
revised
Scoping
Opinion
has
been
expanded (see pages 2846 of the revised Scoping
Report) to additionally
include reviews of the
National Policy Planning
Framework 2012; North
Wessex Downs AONB
Management Plan 20092014; Wiltshire Local
Transport Plan 2006-2007;
Wiltshire
&
Swindon
Economic Strategy 20032008;
Wiltshire
Biodiversity Action Plan
2009;
Wiltshire’s
Sustainability
Appraisal
Report
Focussed
Consultation Document,
September
2012;
Air
Quality
Strategy
for
Wiltshire
2011-2015;
Wiltshire
Carbon
Management Plan 20132017; English Heritage At
Risk Register 2013 and the
North Wiltshire Local Plan
2006. Note: It was pointed
out that this plan had been
superseded
by
the
Wiltshire Core Strategy but
Wiltshire Council insisted
that it be included in an email dated 15 December
2012 which stated:
“As the LPA we can
confirm
unequivocally
that the North Wiltshire
Local Plan is still in force
for your area. It has not
been superseded by the
Wiltshire Core Strategy,
nor will it be until that
document is formally
adopted.
The
Core
Strategy has not yet been
formally
adopted.
Page 105
Compton Bassett Strategic Environmental Assessment
Adoption is planned to
take place in early 2015.
The Regulations state
quite clearly that the SEA
must cover all relevant
policies and this would
include those of the Local
Plan”.
The Scope of this report
The scoping procedure will set out collected information from various
sources, objectives and comparisons which can be used in the
compilation of the Plan. This is the method used by the LA and advised
by the ODPM and PAS.
To establish key issues information will be collected by the following
means:
•
Identifying relevant Plans, Policies and Programmes.
•
Compiling baseline information.
•
Identifying key sustainability and environmental issues and
problems.
•
Establishing appraisal objectives and a sustainability
appraisal framework.
Following this initial scoping process a Sustainability Appraisal Report
will be published for consultation alongside the NDP. This will assess
the likely significant effects of the NDP and reasonable alternatives
taking into account the objectives and geographical scope of the plan.
The topic areas selected for the scoping report have been drawn from
those used by the LA in their procedures used when compiling the Core
Strategy with some additions suitable for Pewsey area. Sustainability
guidance requires that any inter-relationship between topic areas
should be taken into consideration and addressed in the report. The
sustainability topics considered in this report encompass those
required by the SA Directive but include wider social and economic
The
revised
Scoping
Report contains a SEA
Quality
Assurance
Checklist (see page 84)
which demonstrates that
the Scoping Report and
Sustainability Assessment
incorporating the SEA
Directive
requirements
(see Appendix 1, page 90)
are fully compliant with
the
SEA
Directive
requirements.
See Revised Sustainability
Assessment incorporating
the
SEA
Directive
requirements.
The
original
Scoping
Report contained a section
on Policy Context which
reviewed the Wiltshire
Core Strategy and the
Calne Area Strategy.
The
revised
Scoping
Opinion
has
been
expanded (see pages 2846 of the revised Scoping
Report) to additionally
include reviews of the
National Policy Planning
Framework 2012; North
Wessex Downs AONB
Management Plan 20092014; Wiltshire Local
Transport Plan 2006-2007;
Wiltshire
&
Swindon
Economic Strategy 20032008;
Wiltshire
Biodiversity Action Plan
2009;
Wiltshire’s
Sustainability
Appraisal
Page 106
Compton Bassett Strategic Environmental Assessment
considerations.
Report
Focussed
Consultation Document,
September
2012;
Air
Quality
Strategy
for
Wiltshire
2011-2015;
Wiltshire
Carbon
Management Plan 20132017; English Heritage At
Risk Register 2013 and the
North Wiltshire Local Plan
2006. Note: It was pointed
out that this plan had been
superseded
by
the
Wiltshire Core Strategy but
Wiltshire Council insisted
that it be included in an email dated 15 December
2012 which stated:
“As the LPA we can
confirm
unequivocally
that the North Wiltshire
Local Plan is still in force
for your area. It has not
been superseded by the
Wiltshire Core Strategy,
nor will it be until that
document is formally
adopted.
The
Core
Strategy has not yet been
formally
adopted.
Adoption is planned to
take place in early 2015.
The Regulations state
quite clearly that the SEA
must cover all relevant
policies and this would
include those of the Local
Plan”.
Each of the above documents [documents listed in Chapter 2] needs to
be reviewed to show how it is relevant. This does not have to be
comprehensive – for instance it could be done via a table.
For each document reviewed you should provide the following:
• Name of policy/plan/programme/legislation
• Author
• Date of publication
• Brief summary of document
• Key objective/requirements/conclusions to be taken into
consideration in your neighbourhood plan
The
original
Scoping
Report contained a section
on Policy Context which
reviewed the Wiltshire
Core Strategy and the
Calne Area Strategy.
The
revised
Scoping
Opinion
has
been
expanded (see pages 2846 of the revised Scoping
Report) to additionally
Page 107
Compton Bassett Strategic Environmental Assessment
• How the objectives might be considered in your neighbourhood plan
An example of how you might present this information is shown below.
EXAMPLE:
Plan/Programme/legislation Air Quality Strategy for Wiltshire 20112015
Author Wiltshire Council
Document date January 2010
Summary of document
Local authorities have a duty under the Environment Act 1995 to
review and assess local air quality within their areas, against a set of
health-based objectives for a number of specific air pollutants. The
document provides an overview of air quality across Wiltshire and
focuses on key areas where air quality could and should be improved.
The purpose of the Strategy is to support the achievement of air quality
objectives and to raise air quality as an issue for consideration within a
wide range of local government and regional planning frameworks.
Consideration of air quality objectives will hopefully help reduce the
risk of the most serious health effects related to pollution.
Key objectives/requirements/conclusions to be taken into
consideration in neighbourhood plan
The main aim of the strategy is that: ‘Wiltshire Council working
collaboratively will seek to maintain the good air quality in the county
and strive to deliver improvements in areas where air quality fails
national objectives in order to protect public health and the
environment’.
The strategy will seek to:
1. Promote greater consistency across a range of policy areas for the
achievement of improved local
air quality, including local spatial planning, transport planning, health,
industry, housing and
environmental protection, and to ensure air quality is addressed in a
multi-disciplinary way within
the different departments of Wiltshire Council;
2.Provide the framework for a consistent approach to addressing local
air quality considerations in
spatial planning and development control processes;
3.Provide a baseline framework for developing a coherent air quality
policy across Wiltshire with
particular reference to spatial and transport planning, and the
proposed Local Development
Framework, Core Strategy and third Local Transport Plan;
4.Provide a link to wider initiatives across the authority (for example
include reviews of the
National Policy Planning
Framework 2012; North
Wessex Downs AONB
Management Plan 20092014; Wiltshire Local
Transport Plan 2006-2007;
Wiltshire
&
Swindon
Economic Strategy 20032008;
Wiltshire
Biodiversity Action Plan
2009;
Wiltshire’s
Sustainability
Appraisal
Report
Focussed
Consultation Document,
September
2012;
Air
Quality
Strategy
for
Wiltshire
2011-2015;
Wiltshire
Carbon
Management Plan 20132017; English Heritage At
Risk Register 2013 and the
North Wiltshire Local Plan
2006. Note: It was pointed
out that this plan had been
superseded
by
the
Wiltshire Core Strategy but
Wiltshire Council insisted
that it be included in an email dated 15 December
2012 which stated:
“As the LPA we can
confirm
unequivocally
that the North Wiltshire
Local Plan is still in force
for your area. It has not
been superseded by the
Wiltshire Core Strategy,
nor will it be until that
document is formally
adopted.
The
Core
Strategy has not yet been
formally
adopted.
Adoption is planned to
take place in early 2015.
The Regulations state
quite clearly that the SEA
must cover all relevant
policies and this would
include those of the Local
Plan”.
Page 108
Compton Bassett Strategic Environmental Assessment
climate change programmes,
community initiatives and energy efficiency programmes).
5.Build on existing practice.
How objectives and/or requirements might be considered in your
neighbourhood plan
Planning documents should aim to help achieve the objectives of the
air quality strategy through the development of policies that will
improve air quality. Spatial planning has an important role in helping to
improve air quality in Wiltshire through providing development in
sustainable locations that will help reduce the need to travel and
encourage use of sustainable transport.
The final part of this is to summarise the document review. In
particular, has the document review highlighted any key issues that
your neighbourhood plan should focus on?
This section [Sustainability Context] is fine but it does not include the
consideration of the area evolving without a plan as stated above (‘and
the likely evolution thereof without the implementation of the plan’).
You could say here (for clarity): ‘Overall, examining the above evidence Added under Step A3 (see
and discussing this within the village, it is clear that the key page 75 of the revised
environment and sustainability issues are’: … [Refers to Chapter 4]
Scoping Report).
Chapter 6 : Scoping Report Conclusion
Brief summary of report and its influence on your emerging plan.
Chapter 7: Next steps and consultation on this report
You should point out the consultation you intend to do on the Scoping
Report:
“Scoping
Report
Conclusion” added (see
page 85 of the revised
Scoping Report).
“Next Steps” added (see
page 85 of the revised
Scoping Report).
The SA Directive 2001/42/EC requires consultation with:
“Authorities with environmental responsibility when deciding on the
scope and level of detail of the information to be included in the
environmental report (Article 5.4)”
Page 109
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