here - Improvement Academy

Invitation to a symposium with international experts
IMPLEMENTATION SCIENCE:
ADVANCING POLICY AND PRACTICE
Wednesday 11th February 2015
10.15 to 16.00
Executive Suite, Yorkshire County Cricket Club, Leeds
This is an invited event for senior clinicians, managers, policy-makers and researchers.
We will be sharing current evidence and opinion on the implementation of evidence-based
practice and quality improvement. Speakers include leading international experts from
North America and Europe.
We will also be sharing emerging findings and lessons from ASPIRE: Action to Support
Practices Implementing Research Evidence. This is an NIHR-funded programme of
research for primary care. Our mission is to develop and test ways to support general
practices in implementing evidence-based practice effectively within the constraints and
challenges of real-life general practice.
RSVP to Wendy Hobson: w.hobson@leeds.ac.uk; 0113 343 0837
The CLAHRC
Yorkshire and Humber
PROGRAMME
Registration and refreshments
10.15
Welcome to the symposium
Professor John Wright, Director of Bradford Institute for
Health Research
10.45
What is implementation
science and why do we need
it?
Jeremy Grimshaw, Senior Scientist, Clinical
Epidemiology Program, Ottawa Hospital Research
Institute & Canada Research Chair in Health
Knowledge Transfer and Uptake
11.00
Can we get better at tailoring
approaches to improve
practice?
Michel Wensing, Professor of Implementation Science,
Radboud University Medical Centre, Scientific Institute
for Quality in Healthcare, Nijmegen
11.25
What can behavioural sciences Jill Francis, Professor of Health Services Research, City
offer?
University, London
11.50
What have we learned so far
from ASPIRE?
Robbie Foy, Professor of Primary Care, Leeds Institute
of Health Sciences, University of Leeds & general
practitioner
12.15
Discussion with panel
12.40
Lunch
13.00
Can we learn anything from
across the Atlantic on how to
improve quality and safety?
Paul Shekelle, Professor of Medicine, University of
California, Los Angeles School of Medicine & Director,
Southern California Evidence-based Practice Center,
RAND Corporation
13.45
Tales of the unexpected: why
don’t interventions work as
hoped?
Penny Hawe, Professor of Public Health, Menzies
Centre for Health Policy, University of Sydney, Australia
14.10
Can partnerships with
professionals and patients
improve quality and safety?
Rebecca Lawton, Professor in Psychology of
Healthcare, University of Leeds & Bradford Institute for
Health Research
14.35
How can we improve research
to improve implementation?
Anne Sales, Professor, School of Nursing, University
of Michigan & Research Scientist, Center for Clinical
Management Research, VA Ann Arbor Healthcare
System.
15.00
Discussion with panel
15.25
Close of play
16.00
SPEAKER BIOGRAPHIES
Paul Shekelle is a Professor of Medicine at the
University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA)
School of Medicine. In addition to currently
serving as a Staff Physician at the West Los
Angeles Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Dr.
Shekelle has served as the Director of the
Southern California Evidence-based Practice
Center for the RAND Corporation since 1997. He
is widely recognized in the field of guidelines, quality measurement,
and evidence-based medicine. Dr. Shekelle has extensive experience
in the health care arena and was previously the methodologist for
the Agency for Health Care Policy and Research (now the Agency for
Healthcare Research and Quality [AHRQ]) Low-Back Guidelines
Panel, and he has participated in a number of other guideline
development activities. He is the immediate past-chair of the
Clinical Guidelines Committee of the American College of
Physicians. After receiving a B.S. in both Biology and Chemistry at
the University of Illinois, Dr. Shekelle earned his M.D. in 1982 from
Duke University. He completed his internship, residency, and
fellowship at UCLA, where he also obtained his M.P.H. in 1989 and
his Ph.D. in 1993.
Anne Sales is a Professor in the School of
Nursing, University of Michigan, and Research
Scientist at the Center for Clinical Management
Research at the VA Ann Arbor Healthcare
System. Her training is in sociology, health
economics, econometrics, and general health
services research. Her current work involves
understanding the way feedback reports affect
provider behavior and through behavior change have an impact on
patient outcomes, and the role of social networks in uptake of
knowledge translation interventions. She has been a deputy editor
for Medical Care as well as an associate editor for Implementation
Science, and is now co-Editor-in-Chief of Implementation Science.
Jeremy Grimshaw received a MBChB from the
University of Edinburgh, UK. He trained as a
family physician prior to undertaking a PhD in
health services research at the University of
Aberdeen. He moved to Canada in 2002. His
research focuses on the evaluation of
interventions to disseminate and implement
evidence-based practice. Dr. Grimshaw is a
Senior Scientist, Clinical Epidemiology Program, Ottawa Hospital
Research Institute, a Full Professor in the Department of Medicine,
University of Ottawa and a Tier 1 Canada Research Chair in Health
Knowledge Transfer and Uptake. He is Director of Cochrane Canada
and Co-coordinating Editor of the Cochrane Effective Practice and
Organisation of Care group. He was also the Principal Investigator of
Knowledge Translation Canada (KT CANADA), a CIHR and CFI
funded interdisciplinary network of over 50 knowledge translation
researchers from six academic health science centres in three
provinces. He has over 450 peer reviewed publications.
Penny Hawe is Professor of Public Health,
Menzies Centre for Health Policy, University of
Sydney, Australia. She was the former Markin
Chair in Health and Society at the University of
Calgary. Her training is in community psychology
and population health epidemiology. Her
research interest is in the theory, methods, ethics
and economics of complex interventions to
promote health.
Michel Wensing is a Professor in the Radboud
University Medical Centre, Scientific Institute for
Quality in Healthcare, Nijmegen, the
Netherlands. His training is in social sciences,
quality improvement, and health services
research. His work mainly concerns primary care,
focusing on family medicine as well as other
health professions. He has advisory roles at
several university departments of general practice across Europe.
Current research focuses on tailored implementation of evidencebased practice and the role of social networks in chronic illness care.
Other important themes in his current work are patient safety,
out-of-hours care, revision of professional roles, community
pharmacy care, and practice accreditation. He is co-Editor-in-Chief
of Implementation Science.
Jill Francis is Professor of Health Services
Research at City University London. She was an
experimental social psychologist by training,
completing her PhD in this field at the University
of Melbourne (Australia) and working as a
Lecturer in Social Psychology and in Research
Methods at La Trobe University. She moved to
the UK in 2002, working initially at the Institute
for Health and Society at the University of Newcastle, where she
became interested in behaviour change to improve health and health
care. At the University of Aberdeen, Jill worked as Lead health
psychologist at the Health Services Research Unit and the Centre for
Healthcare Randomised Trials (CHaRT). She works with research
networks across the UK, Canada and Australia. Her interests include
implementation research, and applying and developing complex
intervention methodology in the context of randomised trials.
Rebecca Lawton is Professor in Psychology of
Healthcare at the University of Leeds. Since
2009, Rebecca has held a joint position at
Bradford Institute for Health Research, Bradford
Royal Infirmary where she leads the Quality and
Safety Research team, a multi-disciplinary team
of researchers engaged in high quality applied
health research. Rebecca is also academic
advisor for the AHSN Improvement Academy in Yorkshire and
Humber, she leads a programme of research on evidence based
transformation within the NHS as part of the Yorkshire and Humber
CLAHRC. Rebecca has published widely on patient safety and
behaviour change and has received funding from NIHR, ESRC, DH,
TSB and the Health Foundation. Her research focuses on the
application of psychological theories of behaviour change and
human factors to patient safety.
Robbie Foy is Professor of Primary Care at the
Leeds Institute of Health Sciences and a family
physician in inner-city Leeds. His research aims
to inform policy decisions about how best to use
resources to improve the uptake of research
findings by evaluating approaches to change
professional behaviour. He is also trained in
health services research and public health. He
was a 2006-7 Harkness and Health Foundation Fellow in Health
Care Policy, based jointly between the Veteran’s Administration and
RAND in Los Angeles. He is Deputy Editor-in-Chief of
Implementation Science, and was a founding member of the
editorial team in 2006. He is principal investigator for the ASPIRE
programme.
Clinical research continually produces new evidence that can benefit patients. Despite the best efforts of many professionals,
this evidence does not reliably find its way into everyday patient care. Much research suggests that we can do better for our
patients – everyone knows this, and knows that achieving it is often easier said than done! We also understand the many
competing demands that general practices face.
Our mission is to develop and test ways to support general practices in implementing evidence-based practice effectively
within the constraints and challenges of real-life general practice.
http://medhealth.leeds.ac.uk/aspire