Validation of Six-Minute-Walk Distance as a Surrogate

DOI: 10.1161/CIRCULATIONAHA.112.105890
Validation of Six-Minute-Walk Distance as a Surrogate Endpoint in
Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension Trials
Running title: Gabler et al.; Validation of 6MWD in PAH trials
Nicole B. Gabler, PhD, MPH, MHA1; Benjamin French, PhD1,2 ; Brian L. Strom, MD, MPH1,2 ;
Harold I. Palevsky, MD3,4 ; Darren B. Taichman, MD, PhD3,4 ; Steven M. Kawut, MD, MS1,3,4;
Scott D. Halpern, MD, PhD1,2,3,4
1
Center for Clinical Epidemiology & Biostatistics and Dept of Biostatistics & Epidemiology;
Leonard
Le
eon
onar
ardd Davis
ar
Davi
Da
v s In
Institute
nst
s itute of Health Economics; 3Pu
Pulmonary, Allergy,
Aller
ergy, and
and Critical Care Division;
4
Pulmonary
Pul
Pu
lm ry Vascular
lmonar
Vasc
scul
ular
ar Disease
Dis
isea
easee Program
Pro
P
rogr
gram
am of
of the
the Penn
Penn Cardiovascular
Caard
rdio
iova
v sccul
ulaar
ar Institute,
Ins
nsti
tittutee, Perelman
Pere
Pe
relm
lman
an School
Sch
S
choo
ooll of
Medi
Me
dici
di
cine
ci
ne, Un
ne
Univ
iv
ver
ersi
sitty ooff P
ennnsylvvan
vania,
nia,, P
hila
hi
l de
la
dellph
lphiaa, PA
A
Medicine,
University
Pennsylvania,
Philadelphia,
2
C
Correspondence:
orrespond
nden
ence
ce::
Ni
Nicole
l B.
B Gabler,
G bl PhD
Perelman School of Medicine
University of Pennsylvania
708 Blockley Hall
423 Guardian Drive
Philadelphia, PA 19104-6021
Tel: 215-573-0779
Fax : 215-573-5315
E-mail: gabler@upenn.edu
Journal Subject Codes: [18] Pulmonary circulation and disease; [26] Exercise/exercise
testing/rehabilitation; [100] Health policy and outcome research
1
Downloaded from http://circ.ahajournals.org/ by guest on July 11, 2016
DOI: 10.1161/CIRCULATIONAHA.112.105890
Abstract:
Background - Nearly all available treatments for pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) have
been approved based on change in six-minute-walk distance (¨6MWD) as a clinically important
endpoint, but validity as a surrogate endpoint has never been shown. We aimed to validate the
difference in ¨6MWD against the probability of a clinical event in PAH trials.
Methods and Results - First, to determine if ¨6MWD between baseline and 12 weeks mediated
the relationship between treatment assignment and development of clinical events, we conducted
a pooled analysis of patient-level data from the ten randomized placebo-controlled trials
previously submitted to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (n=2404). Second, to identify a
threshold effect for the ¨6MWD that indicated a statistically significant reduction in clinical
g
g 21 drug/dose
g
events,, we conducted a meta-regression
among
level combinations. ¨6MWD
h m
he
etaet
aaccounted for 22.1% (95% CI: 12.1%, 31.1%) of the treatment effect (p<0.001).. T
The
metaanalysis showed an average difference in ¨6MWD of 22.4 m (95% CI: 17.4 to 27.5), favoring
y of a clinical event
active treatment over placebo. Active treatment decreased the probability
sum
umma
mary
y OR:
OR: 0.44;
0.4
.44;
4; 95%
5% CI:
CI: 0.33,
0.333, 0.57).
0.557)). Thee meta-regression
met
etaa-regr
gres
e sion revealed
rev
e eaale
ledd a significant
sign
gnif
i icantt threshold
thre
th
reshold
(summary
efffeect
c of 41.8 m
eters.
s.
effect
meters.
Conc
Co
ncclu
usionss - O
ur results
ressullts suggest
re
suugg
ges
est that
thatt ¨
6M
MWD
WD does
does not
noot explain
explai
plainn a large
larrge proportion
prrop
opor
ortion
on of
of the
th
he
Conclusions
Our
¨6MWD
reaatm
tmentt effect,
effect
ef
ct, has
has only
o ly
on
y modest
mod
odes
e t validity
v lidiity as
va
as a surrogate
surrog
su
gat
atee en
endp
dpoi
o ntt ffor
or cclinical
linic
icall eevents,
vents,, aand
ve
ndd m
a nnot
ay
o
treatment
endpoint
may
be a sufficien
en
nt su
surr
rrog
rr
oggat
a e en
ndp
dpoi
oint
ntt. F
urrth
ther
er rresearch
esea
es
earc
ea
rchh is
i nnecessary
eces
ec
esssar
aryy to
o ddetermine
eter
et
ermi
er
mine
mi
ne whether
whe
w
heth
he
ther
th
er the
sufficient
surrogate
endpoint.
Further
threshold value of 41.8 m is valid for long-term outcomes or if it differs among trials using
background therapy or lacking placebo controls entirely.
Key words: hypertension, pulmonary; meta-analysis; statistics; trials
2
Downloaded from http://circ.ahajournals.org/ by guest on July 11, 2016
DOI: 10.1161/CIRCULATIONAHA.112.105890
Introduction
Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a progressive disease leading to right heart failure and
death.1-2 Seven drugs developed in the last 20 years have been shown to improve six-minutewalk distance (6MWD) in patients with PAH and have been approved for use in the U.S. on that
basis. While 6MWD is viewed by regulatory agencies as a clinically important endpoint in its
own right, several studies have shown that patients who achieve greater improvements in 6MWD
(or reach certain absolute values of 6MWD) have better clinical outcomes.3-5 However, such
observational data are insufficient to determine whether 6MWD is a valid surrogate endpoint for
clinical events.6-9
Determining the validity of 6MWD as a surrogate endpoint in PAH trials
ls iiss pa
part
particularly
rttic
icul
ular
ul
a ly
ar
timely
imely in light of conflicting results of recent meta-analyses.10-13 While some of these
co
ont
ntra
radi
ra
dict
di
ctio
ct
ions
io
ns may
may be
b due to inadequate samplee size
size or follow-up,
follow-upp, or tto
o in
iintrinsic
trinsic limitations of
contradictions
study-level
tud
dyy level meta-analyses,
meta
me
taa-aanaaly
lyse
sees,
s these
tthe
hese
he
se differences
difffe
ferrenncess also
also suggest
suggeest
st the
tthhe possibility
posssiibi
bili
liity that
tha
hatt 6WMD
6WMD is
is a poor
poor
poo
or
14-17
4-1
17
surrogate.
urr
rrog
ogat
og
a e. In tthi
at
this
his stud
sstudy,
tud
dy, w
we uused
sed ttwo
wo ccomplementary
om
mpl
plem
men
ntaary aapproaches
ppro
pp
roac
ro
acche
hes to vva
validate
alid
id
dat
atee 6M
6MWD
6MWD.
WD.14
WD
First,
F
Firs
i st,
patiien
ntt leeve
vell data
da from
fro
om all
all available
a ai
av
aila
labl
la
blee Phase
bl
Phas
Ph
asse III
III randomized
raand
ndom
omiz
om
ized
iz
e clinical
cliini
nica
call trials
ca
ttri
rial
a s submitted
al
subm
su
bmitted for
bm
we used patient-level
drug approval to assess whether changes in 6MWD ('6MWD) mediate the relationship between
treatment assignment and clinical outcomes. Second, we quantified how treatment effects on
'6MWD predicted treatment effects on patient-centered outcomes, with the goal of determining
whether a threshold '6MWD exists beyond which investigators could reliably predict that
superior clinical outcomes would follow in future trials.
Methods
Study Population
Through a contract with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to one author (SDH), we
3
Downloaded from http://circ.ahajournals.org/ by guest on July 11, 2016
DOI: 10.1161/CIRCULATIONAHA.112.105890
obtained de-identified individual patient data for all participants in Phase III placebo-controlled
randomized trials submitted to the FDA through 2008 testing prostanoids, endothelin receptor
antagonists, or phosphodiesterase inhibitors. Eleven clinical trials examined seven agents
(ambrisentan, bosentan, sitaxsentan, iloprost, treprostinil, sildenafil, and tadalafil). We excluded
one study (BREATHE-2) because it only included 33 participants and was not a Phase-III trial.
Additional trial details are available elsewhere.18-25 We purposely included trials of treatments
that were not approved by the FDA (e.g., sitaxsentan), a result of either unacceptable toxicity of
effective dosages or dosages that were determined to be ineffective. Both the mediator and
threshold analyses would be predictably biased if we only included FDA-approved treatments,
and the resulting conclusions would not be useful for future trial design orr regulatory
regullator
at ry decisions.
deci
de
cisi
ci
sion
si
o s.
on
s
All included trials reported similar methodology, including outcome assessment and variable
co
olllec
ecti
tion
ti
on
n at
at 112-weeks
2-w
-w
weeks
ee follow-up.
collection
C
lin
nic
i al events
event
ntss
Clinical
Cl
lin
inic
ical
ic
a eeve
al
vent
ve
n s in
nt
nclud
cluded
ed
d aany
ny ooff th
thee foll
ffollowing
olllow
wing
ng bbefore
efoore
ef
ore th
he en
endd of th
he tr
tria
iaal: ddeath,
eaath
th,, lu
lung
ng
Clinical
events
included
the
the
trial:
ransplantatio
on,
n atrial
aatr
tria
tr
iaal septostomy,
sept
se
p os
osto
tomy
to
my,, ho
my
hosp
pit
i al
aliz
izzat
atio
io
on du
duee to
o worsening
woors
w
r en
enin
i g PA
in
PAH,
H, w
wit
ithd
hdra
hd
rawa
ra
wall for
wa
transplantation,
hospitalization
withdrawal
worsening right-heart failure, or addition of other PAH medications. We did not consider a
deterioration in 6MWD to represent a clinical event because it was the surrogate we were
attempting to validate. Further details are provided in the Supplemental Material, Table 1.
6MWD
Change in 6MWD was calculated as the difference, in meters, between the distance walked at
baseline and 12 weeks. Baseline 6MWD was recorded at or within two weeks of randomization.
In all analyses, patients who were missing a 12-week 6WMD because they died during the trial
(n=45, 2%) were assigned a value of 0. We chose this value to reflect the fact that deaths are
4
Downloaded from http://circ.ahajournals.org/ by guest on July 11, 2016
DOI: 10.1161/CIRCULATIONAHA.112.105890
extremely important clinical events and also to be consistent with the metric used in the majority
of the trials included in our analysis. We used multiple imputation26 to designate values for
patients who survived but were nonetheless missing 12-week 6MWD (n=182, 8%). The
imputation model included variables associated with clinical events: baseline 6MWD, age,
gender, weight, race, height, diagnosis category (idiopathic, connective tissue disease, HIV
infection/anorexigen use, or congenital heart disease), 6MWD at 4 or 6-weeks follow-up, NYHA
functional classification, warfarin use, baseline sodium, cardiac output, and mean pulmonary
arterial pressure. Five datasets were imputed. All imputations were completed in SAS version
9.2.27
Mediator Analysis
We utilized standard methodology to determine whether '6MWD mediates the relationship
between
treatment
events
beetw
twee
eenn trea
ee
tr
rea
e tmen
tmen
nt as
aassignment
signment and the development
developm
men
e t of clinical ev
ven
e tss aatt 12
112-weeks
-weeks follow-up.15-16
We defined
d
treatment
tre
reat
attment
nt assignment
asssig
ssignm
nmen
nm
entt as either
eithher active
acttive treatment
trreatm
tm
men
entt or
or placebo.
pllaccebo
bo.. W
Wee cond
cconducted
ondducte
ucte
t d re
regression
egr
greesssion
analyses
anal
an
alys
al
yses
ys
es to
to ev
eevaluate
val
aluuate
uate tth
the
he ffour
he
our fo
ou
ffollowing
llow
ll
owin
ow
ingg hy
hypo
hypotheses.
poth
po
hes
e es. Re
Reje
Rejecting
ject
je
ctiing
ct
ing th
the
he nu
null
lll for
or aall
ll ffour
ourr hypo
ou
hhypotheses
ypo
poth
hes
esees
was necessary
necessar
arry to support
sup
uppo
p rt
po
r '6MWD
'6M
6MWD
WD as
as a mediator/surrogate
medi
me
d at
di
a or
or/s
/sur
/s
urro
ur
r ga
ro
gate
tee end
end point.
poi
oint
nt..
nt
(1) Treatment assignment has a significant effect on '6WMD from baseline to 12 weeks;
(2) '6MWD has a significant effect on the odds of developing a clinical event;
(3) Treatment assignment has a significant effect on the odds of developing a clinical event;
(4) The effect of treatment assignment on the odds of developing a clinical event is
attenuated when '6MWD is added to the model.
We used logistic or linear regression for binary or continuous outcomes, respectively.
All regression models adjusted for study to account for study-level differences in treatment
assignment, and for baseline walk distance to account for patient-level differences in risk of
5
Downloaded from http://circ.ahajournals.org/ by guest on July 11, 2016
DOI: 10.1161/CIRCULATIONAHA.112.105890
clinical events. No other adjustments were made because patients were randomly assigned to
treatment or placebo.
After rejecting the null for the above four hypotheses, we determined the proportion of
variability explained by the '6MWD in the relationship between treatment assignment and
development of a clinical event.28-29 We used a generalized linear model with a logit link to
quantify the relationship between treatment assignment and log odds of developing a clinical
event with adjustment for study and baseline walk (‘reduced’ model). We then added the
'6MWD to the model (‘full’ model). The subsequent change in the treatment assignment
coefficient between the reduced and full models provided the proportion of variability explained
by '6MWD. Bootstrap resampling was used to create a confidence interval for tthe
he pper
percent
erce
er
cent
ce
nt
change. Estimates of percent change were obtained for each resampled dataset, and the standard
deviation
devviat
de
viat
atio
ion of the
tthhe estimates
est
stim
i ates across 1000 resampled
resampl
p edd datasets
datasets was used
use
seed as the
tthhe
he standard error.30
dit
itio
io
on, wee uused
sed
ed a m
oddif
ifie
ied
dS
obeel testt tto
o ass
sssesss whet
w
h theer th
he amou
aamount
mountt off m
eddiaatio
a ti n w
as
In add
addition,
modified
Sobel
assess
whether
the
mediation
was
statistically
tat
atis
isti
is
tica
ti
call
ca
llyy si
ll
sign
significant;
gn
nif
ific
ican
ic
ant;
an
t; the
the
h m
modified
odiifi
od
fieed
ed ttes
test
estt ac
es
acco
accounted
coun
co
unte
un
tedd fo
te
forr th
thee fa
fact
ct tthat
hatt th
ha
thee su
surr
surrogate
r og
ogat
atee (c
at
(con
(continuous)
onnti
tinu
nuou
nu
ous)
ou
s)
3
outccom
omee (b
(bin
inar
in
a y)
ar
y w
ere onn ddifferent
er
i feere
if
rent
n ssca
nt
cale
ca
les.
le
s.16, 31
We eevaluated
valu
va
l atted tthe
lu
he aassumption
ssum
ss
umpt
um
ptio
pt
ionn of no effec
io
effect
ct
and the outcome
(binary)
were
scales.
modification between treatment and the mediator31 by fitting a logistic regression model for
clinical events with an interaction term between treatment assignment and '6MWD.
Threshold Effect Analysis
We then conducted a trial-level meta-analysis and meta-regression to assess the relationship of
the treatment effect on the mediator ('6MWD) with the treatment effect on the odds of
developing a clinical event at 12-weeks follow-up. This threshold analysis proceeded in four
steps.
First, we estimated values for the exposure variable, placebo-adjusted study-level
6
Downloaded from http://circ.ahajournals.org/ by guest on July 11, 2016
DOI: 10.1161/CIRCULATIONAHA.112.105890
'6MWD, by conducting linear regressions within each trial. In these trial-specific patient-level
regressions, the exposure variable was treatment (drug and dose), entered as indicator variables
(with placebo as the referent). The outcome variable was '6MWD, and adjustment again was
made for baseline 6WMD.
Second, we estimated values for the outcome, the placebo-adjusted study-level log odds
of developing a clinical event between baseline and 12-weeks, using logistic regression analyses
within each trial. In these trial-specific patient-level regressions, treatment (drug and dose,
entered as indicator variables with placebo as the referent) was the exposure, clinical event (yes
or no) was the outcome, and adjustment was made for baseline 6MWD. Exact logistic
regression
egression was used when the number of clinical events in a study was small.
Third, we used the 21 drug/dose combinations vs. placebo across trials in a fixed-effects
meta-regression
relating
'6MWD
meeta
ta--reg
-re re
ress
s ionn re
ss
rela
lating
g estimated difference in '
6MWD to the estimated
estima
es
matted
ted logg odds ratio for
cllin
cclinical
nic
ical events. The
Th square
sqquare of
of the
th inverse
inveersse standard
inve
sttandarrd error
erro
or was
wa used
useed
ed as a weight
weig
ig
ght to
to account
acccou
count
unt for
f r
fo
uncertainty
estimated
ratio.
threshold
effect
calculating
unce
un
ceert
rtai
aint
ai
ntyy in
nt
in tthe
he eest
stim
st
imat
im
ated
at
e llog
og oodds
ddss ra
dd
ati
tio.
o. We ddetermined
eter
et
ermi
er
mine
mi
nedd th
ne
thee th
hre
resh
shol
sh
oldd ef
ol
effe
fect
fe
ct bby
y ca
alc
lcul
ulat
ul
atin
at
ingg
in
95% prediction
predicti
tiion bands
ban
ands
ds around
aroun
roun
undd the
th
he meta-regression
meta
me
ta-r
-reg
-r
egre
eg
r ss
re
ssio
ionn line.
io
l ne. The
li
The threshold
thr
hres
esho
hoold was
was ccalculated
alcu
al
cula
cu
late
la
tedd aass the valuee
te
of difference in '6MWD where the upper prediction band crossed the null value of 1.0 for
relative odds of a clinical event. Prediction bands quantify the uncertainty in predicting the
difference in clinical worsening in a single trial given a defined difference in '6MWD. Linearity
of the final regression model was assessed via standard regression diagnostics.
Finally, we sought to determine whether study-level patient characteristics confounded
the association between '6MWD and relative odds of clinical events. Potential confounders
were chosen a priori based on known differences in treatment response by race and sex,32 and by
diagnosis and NYHA functional classification.33 Therefore, covariates in our regression model
7
Downloaded from http://circ.ahajournals.org/ by guest on July 11, 2016
DOI: 10.1161/CIRCULATIONAHA.112.105890
were race (% black), sex (% female), PAH diagnostic category (% connective-tissue related), and
NYHA functional classification (% III or IV). If a potential confounder altered the coefficient
for the treatment variable by 10% or more, it was retained in the final model.
We conducted two secondary analyses. First, we excluded the PHIRST study, in which
patients were permitted to use background therapy with other approved PAH-specific agents.
Second, we removed patients who were New York Heart Association (NYHA) class IV at
randomization since it is unlikely that these patients will be included in future clinical trials. All
regressions and meta-regressions were conducted in R version 2.13 (R Development Core Team,
Vienna, Austria).
This study was determined to be exempt by the Institutional Review Board
Boar
arrd of
of the
the
University of Pennsylvania (approval #814001). All co-authors had access to the study data,
take
authority
manuscript
akee responsibility
rres
espo
es
po
ons
n ib
ibilit
itty for
f r the analysis, and had auth
fo
hor
o ity over manusc
sccript
pt ppreparation
re
reparation
and the
decision
publication.
deciisi
deci
s on to submit
suubm
mitt ffor
or pub
ubli
ub
lica
li
cattion
ca
tion..
Results
Resu
Re
sult
su
ltss
lt
The ten trials included 2404 patients; 1563 (65%) were allocated to active treatment.
Participants’ median age was 50 years (range: 10 to 90 years), 22% were male, and 5% were
black (Table 1). Five hundred eighty one patients (25%) had a diagnosis of PAH due to
connective tissue disease and 1349 (57%) were categorized as NYHA classification III or IV.
Forty-five patients (2%) died between baseline and 12-weeks follow-up. An additional 153
patients (6%) experienced other clinical events; 83 of these did not have 12-week walk distance.
Mean baseline walk distance was 341 m (standard deviation: 85.7 m). Demographic,
anthropometric, laboratory, and hemodynamic values were similar between groups defined by
treatment allocation.
8
Downloaded from http://circ.ahajournals.org/ by guest on July 11, 2016
DOI: 10.1161/CIRCULATIONAHA.112.105890
Characteristics of the ten trials are presented in Table 2. Study-level percentages of
female patients and patients diagnosed with CTD-related PAH were consistent across studies.
Percentages for NYHA classification III/IV and black race showed more variation across studies.
Does 6MWD mediate the relationship between treatment assignment and clinical events?
The four criteria necessary to establish '6MWD as a mediator of the relationship between
treatment assignment and development of a clinical event are listed in Table 3. For each, we
found a statistically significant result in the required direction. First, assignment to active
treatment vs. placebo led to greater differences in the '6MWD (mean difference in '6MWD:
22.2 m; 95% CI: 15.6 to 28.9 m). Second, greater differences in '6MWD significantly reduced
the
he odds of clinical events at 12-weeks follow-up (OR: 0.89; 95% CI: 0.87 to 0.91)
0.991)
1 for
for
or a tenten
en-meter increase in '6MWD. Third, assignment to active treatment vs. placebo significantly
deecr
creease
eas d th
he re
ela
lati
tive
v oodds
dd
ds off cclinical
linica
li
c l ev
ven
e ts aatt 12
2-weeks
ks ((OR: 0.
0.4
43; 95
95%
% CI
CI: 0.
0.31 too 0.
00.59).
59).
59
)
decreased
the
relative
events
12-weeks
0.43;
F naall
Fi
l y, the effec
ct ooff ttreatment
reaatmeent assi
siign
gnme
ment oon
me
n the ddevelopment
eveelo
lopm
pmennt ooff a clin
pm
niccal eev
vent w
as aattenuated
ttenuuatted
Finally,
effect
assignment
clinical
event
was
with
wiith
h the
the addition
aadd
ddit
dd
itio
io
on of '
'6MWD
6MWD
6M
W to
WD
to the
the model
mo
ode
dell (OR:
(OR
(O
R: 0.52;
R:
0.52;
52;
2 95%
95% CI:
CI 0.37
0 37 to
0.
to 0.73).
0.73
7 ). The
73
The proportion
prop
pr
opor
op
orti
or
tion
ti
on ooff
he effect off treatment
trea
tr
eatm
t en
tm
entt on tthe
h oodd
he
ddds of ddeveloping
evel
ev
elop
opiing
ing a cl
lin
inic
icall eeve
vent
nt att 12 w
wee
eeks
ks tthat
hatt wa
ha
wass expl
p ainedd
the
odds
clinical
event
weeks
explained
by '6MWD was 22.1% (95% CI: 12.1% to 31.1%). Additionally, the modified Sobel test
confirmed the statistical significance of the mediation (Z = 4.77, p<0.001). There was no
significant interaction between treatment and '6MWD (estimate and 95% CI: 0.002 (-0.002,
0.006), p=0.25).
Does a threshold effect exist for '6MWD?
Compared with placebo, nearly all drug/dose combinations resulted in a greater '6MWD at 12weeks follow-up (Table 4). The summary results indicate an average difference in '6MWD of
22.4 m (95% CI: 17.4 to 27.5) for assignment to active treatment relative to placebo. The effect
9
Downloaded from http://circ.ahajournals.org/ by guest on July 11, 2016
DOI: 10.1161/CIRCULATIONAHA.112.105890
on reduction of clinical events was consistent across drug/dose combinations. Relative to
placebo, all 21 drug/dose combinations lowered the odds of developing a clinical event at 12
weeks follow-up (summary OR: 0.44; 95% CI: 0.33 to 0.57).
Figure 1 illustrates the results of our meta-regression and threshold analysis. The upper
prediction interval crossed the null value for relative odds of a clinical event at a difference in
'6MWD of 41.8 meters. This value indicates the minimal summary difference in '6MWD that
corresponds to a statistically significant reduction in clinical events. Models including race, sex,
diagnosis category, and NYHA functional classification showed no evidence of confounding and
these variables were not included in the final meta-regression model.
In a sensitivity analysis, we removed the four
drug/dose combinations from
PHIRST
f
fro
om th
thee PH
PHIR
IRST
IR
ST
study,
tudy, as this study was the only one to allow concomitant background therapy. Excluding this
study
25.7
difference
tud
udyy resulted
resuult
re
lted
ed
d inn a smaller
s aller threshold value of 25.
sm
5.77 m for the differ
erren
e ce iinn '6MWD. In an
additional
analysis,
NYHA
class
change
ad
dditi
dit onal ana
aly
lyssiss, rremoving
emov
ovin
ingg NYH
N
YHA cl
cla
ass IV patients
pattieentss (n=127)
(n=
(n
=127)
=12
27) did
did not
noot appreciably
apprrecia
iabl
blly ch
chan
ange
an
ge
results.
Further
details
provided
esuult
lts.
s Fu
s.
Furt
rthher
rt
her de
eta
tail
ilss ar
il
aree pr
rov
o id
ided
ed iin
n th
thee Supplemental
Supp
Su
ppllem
pp
lement
ment
n al Material.
Mat
M
ater
at
erria
iall.
Discussion
This study provides the first rigorous examination of the validity of '6WMD from baseline to 12
weeks as a surrogate endpoint in trials of PAH therapies. '6MWD met all criteria as a mediator
of the relationship between treatment and development of a clinical event at 12 weeks. However,
the proportion of this relationship explained by 6MWD was modest at 22%, suggesting that
6MWD may not be an adequate surrogate. A threshold effect of 41.8 meters was also identified,
meaning that if a drug improved 6MWD over 12 weeks by 41.8 meters more than did placebo,
investigators could predict, with 95% confidence, that the drug would reduce the in clinical event
10
Downloaded from http://circ.ahajournals.org/ by guest on July 11, 2016
DOI: 10.1161/CIRCULATIONAHA.112.105890
rate over 12 weeks.
We found that only 4 of the 21 drug-dose combinations produced effects on '6MWD that
could be said, with conventional degrees of certainty, to be associated with clinical
improvements (Figure 1). If the lower threshold value of 25.7 m is used, then 5 of the remaining
17 drug-dose combinations would be considered to produce statistically significant effects on
clinical outcomes in the absence of background therapy. Of these 9 total drug-dose combinations
that met the lower threshold value, one involved a drug that is not approved by the FDA
(sitaxsentan) and two involve dosages that are not included in FDA labeling (sildenafil 40 mg
TID and sildenafil 80 mg TID). Three drugs (iloprost, tadalafil, and treprostinil) did not meet
either of the threshold values.
It is essential to explore the validity of surrogate endpoints because valid surrogates
provide
efficient
studies
prrov
ovid
idee ef
id
effi
fici
fi
cien
ci
nt mechanisms
me
for early phase stu
udiees of new interventions.
interrve
v nttio
ionns.
ns Specifically, trials
utilizing
validated
surrogate
endpoints
conducted
more
quickly,
sample
utiliizing
iz
valida
date
teed su
urrog
gat
atee en
ndp
dpoi
oinnts
oi
nts ccan
an bbee con
nducteed mor
ndu
m
ore
re qqui
uick
ckly
y, with
wi h ssmaller
mall
ma
ller
ll
err ssam
ampl
am
plee
sizes,
risks
izees, fewer
few
few
ewer
er rris
isks
ks to
to subjects,
suubjjec
ects, and
and reduced
redu
re
duce
cedd research
ce
reseear
re
a ch
ch ccosts
osstss tha
tthan
hann trials
ha
t iaalss that
tr
ttha
haat use
use true
true clinical
cli
linnica
nicaal
3
endpoints.34-35
However,
Howe
Ho
weve
we
ver,
ve
r, only
onl
nlyy if surrogate
ssur
urrro
r ga
gate
te endpoints
end
ndpo
poin
po
in
ntss are
aree va
vali
validated
lida
li
date
da
ted wi
te
will
l tthey
ll
heyy cl
he
clearly
lea
earl
rlyy pr
rl
provide thesee
virtues; in the absence of validation, there is considerable risk, as shown famously in the CAST
trial,36 of falsely concluding the effectiveness of a new intervention.
Our data also add to a growing literature on the use of 6MWD as an outcome measure in
other settings. Using different methods, 6MWD has been evaluated in idiopathic pulmonary
fibrosis,37 chronic obstructive pulmonary disease,38 and cardiac rehabilitation.39 In our study, we
found that the proportion of the effect of treatment on preventing clinical events explained by the
change in 6MWD was 22.1%, which falls well below the 50-75% threshold for a valid surrogate
described by Freedman,28 although some consider this an overly stringent criterion.15 Clearly,
11
Downloaded from http://circ.ahajournals.org/ by guest on July 11, 2016
DOI: 10.1161/CIRCULATIONAHA.112.105890
PAH treatments have unmeasured effects on the outcome that are not fully captured by the
change in 6MWD.40 Thus, the finding of true but modest mediation by 6MWD suggests that it
may not be sufficient to use on its own. Incorporation in a combination surrogate measure with
hemodynamic or other assessments might improve its performance and warrants further study.
The threshold value we identified of 41.8 meters for the difference in '6MWD may be
considered for use as the level of improvement in '6MWD necessary to reliably conclude that
the intervention will confer clinical benefits in future trials. Using different methods and patients
from a single study (the SUPER study), Gilbert et al. estimated a minimally clinically important
difference of 41 m that correlated with patient-reported improvement.41 Similarly, in untreated
PAH patients, Paciocco et al. found that each increase in 50 m walked was associ
associated
ciiat
ated
ed w
with
ithh an
it
an
18% reduction in mortality.42 The consistency of findings across these studies using different
methods
me
eth
thoods
od supports
suupp
pporrts the
th robustness of this result. However,
How
owever, '6MWD
D rem
remains
mai
ain
ins an inadeq
inadequate
quate
surrogate
urrrog
o ate endpoi
endpoint
oiintt giv
given
iv
ven
n the
hee m
modest
oddes
estt ddegree
egree ooff me
mediation
ediatio
ionn of
io
of tthe
h ttreatment
he
reeatm
ment eeffect.
ffeect.
ff
t
Confidence
Conf
Co
nfid
nf
iden
ence
en
ce iinn ou
ourr rresults
esu
suult
ltss st
stem
stems
emss fr
from
om tthe
h llarge
he
argge sa
ar
samp
sample
mple
mp
le ssiz
size
izze em
empl
employed
ploy
pl
oyed
oy
ed
d aand
nd tthe
he ffact
he
actt that
ac
that the
the
h
treatment
reatment effects
efffe
fect
ctss on changes
ct
ccha
hang
ha
nges
es in
in 6MWD
6MWD and
and on
on clinical
clin
cl
in
niccal
a eevents
vent
ve
ntss w
nt
were
eree ccon
consistent
onsi
on
sist
si
sten
st
entt ac
acro
across
r ss all drug
ro
doses.43 Nonetheless, this study has limitations. First, as with any meta-analysis, the findings are
subject to errors in the conduct, data entry, or analysis of the primary data. Second, these primary
trials included mostly women and whites, and used relatively short follow-up periods. We are
unable to evaluate clinical endpoints that occur after 12 weeks and our results should not be
generalized beyond this time period. However, the demographics represented are consistent with
the broader epidemiology of PAH, and the included trials all provided similar follow-up, clinical
event definitions, and outcome measurement, making them well suited for our meta-analytic
approach.
12
Downloaded from http://circ.ahajournals.org/ by guest on July 11, 2016
DOI: 10.1161/CIRCULATIONAHA.112.105890
All of the trials that we examined were placebo-controlled, which is an additional
strength. However, one allowed concomitant background therapy. Removal of the PHIRST trial
reduced our threshold value, suggesting that future trials employing background therapies may
be subject to larger threshold values than those reported here. In other words, in the presence of
an effective PAH therapy, an RCT of a new therapy may need to produce larger differences in
the '6MWD to provide confidence that the results correspond to differences in clinical
outcomes. We were unable to further explore the role of background therapy due to small
sample sizes. Future research, therefore, is needed, particularly in light of ethical questions
surrounding the future conduct of placebo-controlled trials in PAH.44
Finally, we used statistical techniques to help address a clinical question. Wh
W
While
ile ou
ourr
threshold
hreshold estimate provides a clear idea of what '6MWD would be needed to indicate that the
benefits
be
ene
nefi
fits
fi
ts off a ttreatment
reaatmen
tme t will be greater than zero,, the
the inference of a “cli
“clinically
lini
niically important”
ddifference
iffference in outcomes
outtcoome
ou
omes might
mig
ighht
ht warrant
war
arra
rannt selection
ra
seelecttio
on off a different
dif
ifffere
fereent threshold.
thrressholld. Individual
Ind
ndiivid
ividua
uall patients
paatieents
ents m
may
ay
show
how
w clinical
ccli
lini
li
nica
ni
call improvement
ca
im
mpr
prov
ovem
ov
emen
em
ent without
en
with
wi
t ouut reaching
th
reaachi
re
achi
hing
ng a cce
certain
ertaain
erta
i '
'6MWD
6MWD
6M
WD threshold
thr
hres
eshhold
hold
d vval
value
alue
al
ue and
and ppatients
atieent
atie
ntss who
who
improve
their
may
clinical
However,
mprove thei
eiir 6M
6MWD
WD m
ay
y nnot
ot nnecessarily
e es
ec
e saari
rily
ly
y eexhibit
xhiibi
xh
bitt cl
clin
i iccal iimprovement.
in
mpro
mp
roveeme
ment
nt. H
nt
ow
wev
ever
e , th
er
the
population-level threshold values we have established are useful in designing future clinical
trials.
In conclusion, we used two complementary approaches to examine the validity of
'6MWD as a surrogate endpoint in clinical trials of PAH therapies. We were able to identify
significant threshold effects of '6MWD that can be used to guide future RCTs, and we found
that '6MWD is a mediator in the relationship between treatment and clinical outcome.
However, because '6MWD does not explain a large proportion of this treatment effect, it may
not be sufficient to use it as a lone surrogate endpoint. Further studies are needed to identify
13
Downloaded from http://circ.ahajournals.org/ by guest on July 11, 2016
DOI: 10.1161/CIRCULATIONAHA.112.105890
combination surrogate endpoints that may have superior characteristics, and to determine if this
threshold value we identified applies to trials employing background therapy or not employing
placebo controls at all.
Acknowledgments: We are grateful to Maximilian Herlim and to Ziyue Liu, PhD, for their
invaluable help preparing the data for analysis and to Dr. Norman Stockbridge and Dr. Salma
Lemtouni at the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for providing us with the data to conduct
this study.
Funding Sources: This work was supported by an American Thoracic Society / Pfizer Research
Grant in Pulmonary Hypertension (Dr. Halpern). Dr. Kawut was supported by K24 HL103844.
Neither the FDA nor the funding source had a role in the design of this study nor in the decision
to submit it for publication. The FDA did review the study prior to submission as a condition of
the original
contract,, but did not request
anyy changes
g
q
g to our text.
Conflict of Interest Disclosures: Dr. Gabler has participated in unrelated projects
project
ctss funded
fund
fu
ndded by
by
Pfizer, Inc. Dr. Strom has served as a consultant for Abbott, Amgen, Astra Zeneca, BMS,
Boehringer
Orexigen,
Boehring
ger Ingelheim, Glaxo, Novartis, NPS Pharma, Nuvo Research, O
rexigen, Pfizer, Teva,
and
Pfizer,
Shire,
an
nd Vivus
Vivvus
Vi
vus an
aandd has
haas funded
f nded research from AstraZeneca,
fu
AstraZe
Zeene
neca, BMS, Pfize
zeer, S
hirre,
hi
re and Takeda. He has
received
contributions
Penn’s
pharmacopeidemiology
training
ece
ceiived
iv con
ntrib
tr but
utio
i ns tto
io
o Pe
Penn
nn’s
’ss ppha
harm
rmac
acop
oppei
eide
dem
mioologgy tr
trai
a ning
ai
ng pprogram
rogr
ro
g am ffrom
gr
rom
ro
m Abbott,
A bo
Ab
bott
ttt, Amgen,
Am
mge
g n,
Hoffman,
H
offfman,
ff
LaR
LaRoche,
Rocchee, N
Novartis,
ova
vart
rtis
rt
iss, Pf
Pfiz
Pfizer,
izzer
er, San
S
Sanofi
anofi
fii P
Pasteur,
asteu
eurr, aand
eu
nd
dW
Wyeth.
yeth
yeth
h. Dr.
Dr. Pa
P
Palevsky
levs
vssky hhas
as rreceived
ecei
ec
e ved
ved
consulting
co
onssul
u ting ffees,
ees, aadvisory
ee
dvisooryy bo
boar
board
arrd fe
fees
fees,
s, sp
speaking
peaking
ng fee
fees
es aand/or
ndd/o
/orr rresearch
essearrch
h fun
funding
ndiing ffr
from
rom Ac
rom
Acte
Actelion,
tellioon,
Bayer,
Ba
aye
yer,
r, G
GeNO,
eN
NO,
O G
Gilead,
ileead
ead,
d, Glaxo,
Gla
laxoo, Pfizer,
Pfiz
Pf
izer
iz
er,, United
er
Unit
Un
ited
it
ed Therapeutics
The
h rap
peu
utiics aand
ndd L
Lun
Lung
unng Rx.
Rx Th
These
hes
e e ro
roles
ole
less in
n nno
ow
way
ayy
impacted
mpa
pact
cted
d onn this
th
his analysis
ana
naly
lysis of
o the
the results
re
of previously
ppre
revi
viou
ouslyy published
publ
pu
blis
ishe
hedd st
studies.
tud
udie
ies.
s Dr
Dr. Ka
Kawu
Kawut
w t ha
has re
rece
received
ceiv
i ed
consulting fees,
fee
eees, advisory
adv
dvis
i or
is
oryy board
boar
bo
ardd fees,
ar
fees
fe
ess, speaking
sppea
eaki
king
ki
ng fe
ffees,
es,, un
es
uunrestricted
reest
stri
r ct
ri
c ed eedu
duuca
cattio
iona
nall gr
na
gran
ants
an
ts,, an
ts
aand/or
d/or
educational
grants,
ese
sear
arch
ch funding
fun
undi
ding
ng from
fro
rom
m Pfizer,
Pfiz
Pf
izer
er Actelion,
Acte
Ac
teli
lion
on Bayer,
Baye
Ba
yerr Ikaria,
Ika
kari
riaa N
ovaart
ov
rtis
is Me
Merc
rckk G
ilea
il
eadd U
nite
ni
tedd
research
Novartis,
Merck,
Gilead,
United
Therapeutics, and Lung Rx. Dr. Taichman has received institutional research funding from
Actelion.
References:
1. Taichman DB, Mandel J. Epidemiology of pulmonary arterial hypertension. Clin Chest Med.
2007;28:1-22.
2. Humbert M, Sitbon O, Chaouat A, Bertocchi M, Habib G, Gressin V, Yaici A, Weitzenblum
E, Cordier JF, Chabot F, Dromer C, Pison C, Reynaud-Gaubert M, Haloun A, Laurent M,
Hachulla E, Cottin V, Degano B, Jais X, Montani D, Souza R, Simonneau G. Survival in patients
with idiopathic, familial, and anorexigen-associated pulmonary arterial hypertension in the
modern management era. Circulation. 2010;122:156-163.
3. Provencher S, Sitbon O, Humbert M, Cabrol S, Jais X, Simonneau G. Long-term outcome
with first-line bosentan therapy in idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension. Eur Heart J.
14
Downloaded from http://circ.ahajournals.org/ by guest on July 11, 2016
DOI: 10.1161/CIRCULATIONAHA.112.105890
2006;27:589-595.
4. Sitbon O, Humbert M, Nunes H, Parent F, Garcia G, Herve P, Rainisio M, Simonneau G.
Long-term intravenous epoprostenol infusion in primary pulmonary hypertension: Prognostic
factors and survival. J Am Coll Cardiol. 2002;40:780-788.
5. Miyamoto S, Nagaya N, Satoh T, Kyotani S, Sakamaki F, Fujita M, Nakanishi N, Miyatake K.
Clinical correlates and prognostic significance of six-minute walk test in patients with primary
pulmonary hypertension - comparison with cardiopulmonary exercise testing. Am J Respir Crit
Care Med. 2000;161:487-492.
6. Baker SG, Kramer BS. A perfect correlate does not a surrogate make. BMC Med Res
Methodol. 2003;3:16.
7. Prentice RL. Surrogate endpoints in clinical trials: Definition and operational criteria. Stat
Med. 1989;8:431-440.
Surrogate
8. Ventetuolo CE, Benza RL, Peacock AJ, Zamanian RT, Badesch DB, Kawut SM.
M.. S
Sur
urro
roga
g te
ga
2008;5:617and combined end points in pulmonary arterial hypertension. Proc Am Thorac Soc.
Soc. 20
008
08;5
;5:6
;5
:617
:6
17622.
hypertension:
9. Snow JL,, Kawut SM. Surrogate end points in pu
ppulmonary
lmonary arterial hyp
ypertension: Assessing the
response
2007;28:75-89.
esppon
onsse
se to
to therapy.
therrap
th
apyy.
y. Clin Chest Med. 2007;28:75
75
5-8
- 9.
Macchia
Marchioli
Marfisi
Scarano
Levantesi
G,, Ta
Tavazzi
Tognoni
G.. A me
meta110.
0. M
acchia A,
A M
Mar
arch
chio
ch
oli R
R,, Ma
M
arf
rffissi R,
R, Sca
araano M,
M Lev
evan
ev
ante
t si
te
s G
Tava
vaazzzi L, T
og
gno
noni
ni G
m
eta
analysis
trials
pulmonary
hypertension:
clinical
condition
drugs
an
nallys
y is of tr
tria
ials ooff pu
ulm
monnaryy hy
hype
erteens
ensionn: A cl
lin
nic
ical
al ccon
ondditioon llooking
on
ookking for
for dr
drug
gs an
andd rresearch
eseearrch
methodology.
Heart
me
eth
thod
odol
od
olog
ogy.
og
y. Am
mH
ea
artt JJ.. 2007;153:1037-1047.
20
0077;1
;153
53:1
53
:103
03377-11047
1047
47..
DL,
Brown
AW,
Shorr
AF.
Analyzing
short-term
effect
11. Helman D
L, B
rown
ro
wn A
W, JJackson
acks
ac
k on
ks
o JJL,
L, S
Sho
horr
ho
rrr A
F An
F.
nal
a yz
yzin
ingg th
in
thee sh
shor
ortor
t-te
term
te
rm eeff
ffec
ff
ectt of
ec
o placebo
therapy
hypertension:
Potential
future
her
erap
apyy in ppulmonary
ulmo
ul
mona
nary
ry aarterial
rter
rt
eria
iall hy
hype
pert
rten
ensi
sion
on:: Po
Pote
tent
ntia
iall implications
impl
im
plic
icat
atio
ions
ns for
for the
the design
desi
de
sign
gn ooff fu
futu
ture
re
clinical trials. Chest. 2007;132:764-777.
12. Galie N, Manes A, Negro L, Palazzini M, Bacchi-Reggiani ML, Branzi A. A meta-analysis
of randomized controlled trials in pulmonary arterial hypertension. Eur Heart J. 2009;30:394403.
13. Macchia A, Marchioli R, Tognoni G, Scarano M, Marfisi R, Tavazzi L, Rich S. Systematic
review of trials using vasodilators in pulmonary arterial hypertension: Why a new approach is
needed. Am Heart J. 2010;159:245-257.
14. Johnson KR, Freemantle N, Anthony DM, Lassere MND. Ldl-cholesterol differences
predicted survival benefit in statin trials by the surrogate threshold effect (ste). J Clin Epidemiol.
2009;62:328-336.
15. Buyse M, Molenberghs G. Criteria for the validation of surrogate endpoints in randomized
experiments. Biometrics. 1998;54:1014-1029.
15
Downloaded from http://circ.ahajournals.org/ by guest on July 11, 2016
DOI: 10.1161/CIRCULATIONAHA.112.105890
16. MacKinnon DP, Dwyer JH. Estimating mediated effects in prevention studies. Eval Rev.
1993;17:144-158.
17. Burzykowski T, Buyse M. Surrogate threshold effect: An alternative measure for metaanalytic surrogate endpoint validation. Pharm Stat. 2006;5:173-186.
18. Simonneau G, Barst RJ, Galie N, Naeije R, Rich S, Bourge RC, Keogh A, Oudiz R, Frost A,
Blackburn SD, Crow JW, Rubin LJ. Continuous subcutaneous infusion of treprostinil, a
prostacyclin analogue, in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension - a double-blind,
randomized, placebo-controlled trial. Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 2002;165:800-804.
19. Galie N, Olschewski H, Oudiz RJ, Torres F, Frost A, Ghofrani HA, Badesch DB, McGoon
MD, McLaughlin VV, Roecker EB, Gerber MJ, Dufton C, Wiens BL, Rubin LJ. Ambrisentan
for the treatment of pulmonary arterial hypertension - results of the ambrisentan in pulmonary
arterial hypertension, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, multicenter, efficacy (aries)
study 1 and 2. Circulation. 2008;117:3010-3019.
Frost
Roux
S,,
20. Rubin LJ, Badesch DB, Barst RJ, Galie N, Black CM, Keogh A, Pulido T, Fros
osst A, R
Rou
ouxx S
arterial
hypertension.
Leconte I, Landzberg M, Simonneau G. Bosentan therapy for pulmonary arteria
al hy
ype
pert
rtten
ensi
sion
si
o .N
on
Engl J Med. 2002;346:896-903.
Olschewski
Simonneau
21. Ol
O
schewski H,, Si
S
monneau G, Galie N, Higenbottam T, Naeije R, Rubin LJ, Nikkho S,
Speich
Spei
Sp
eich
ei
ch R,
R Hoeper
Ho er MM,
M Behr J, Winkler J, Sitbon
on O,
O Popov W, Ghofrani
Gho
h frran
anii HA, Manes A, Kiely
DG,
Ewert
Meyer
A,, Co
Corris
PA,
Delcroix
Gomez-Sanchez
Siedentop
Seeger
DG
G, Ew
E
ertt R, M
eyer
ey
er A
Corr
rris
is P
A, D
Del
elcr
croi
oixx M, Go
Gome
ezz-Sa
Sanc
Sa
n heez M,
M, S
ieede
d nt
ntop
op H
H,, Se
Seeg
eger
eg
e W,
er
W, the
t e
th
Aerosolized
Iloprost
Randomized
Study
iloprost
severe
pulmonary
hypertension.
A
errosolized
ro
Il
loppro
ostt Ran
R
an
ndo
domi
mize
mi
zedd Stud
S
tuddy G. IInhaled
nhaleed ilop
opro
op
rosst
st ffor
or sse
ever
e e pu
ulm
mon
onar
aryy hy
hype
peerttensi
ensi
s on.
Med.
2002;347:322-329.
N En
Engl
g J Med
ed. 20
002;3
347
7:322
22
2-3
329
9.
Frost
EM,
Oudiz
R,, Sh
Shapiro
McLaughlin
Hill
22. Ba
Barst RJ
RJ, Langleben
Lang
La
gle
lebe
b n D,
D F
rost
ro
st A,
A Horn
rn E
M, O
udizz R
Shap
apir
i o S, M
c au
cL
augh
ghli
linn V,
V H
ill N,
Robbins
Zwicke
Duncan
Dixon
RAF,
Frumkin
Sitaxsentan
Tapson VF,, R
obbi
ob
bins
bi
ns IIM,
M Z
M,
wick
wi
ke D, D
Dun
unca
un
cann B, D
ca
ixon
ix
o R
on
AF,, Fr
AF
Frum
u ki
um
k n LR
LR.. Si
S
taaxs
xsen
enta
en
taan therapy
pulmonary
arterial
Respir
forr pu
fo
pulm
lmon
onar
aryy ar
arte
teri
rial
al hhypertension.
yper
yp
erte
tens
nsio
ionn Am J R
espi
es
pirr Crit
Crit Care
Car
aree Med.
Medd 2004;169:441-447.
Me
2004
20
04;1
;169
69:4
:441
41-447
447
23. Barst RJ, Langleben D, Badesch D, Frost A, Lawrence EC, Shapiro S, Naeije R, Galie N.
Treatment of pulmonary arterial hypertension with the selective endothelin-a receptor antagonist
sitaxsentan. J Am Coll Cardiol. 2006;47:2049-2056.
24. Galie N, Ghofrani HA, Torbicki A, Barst RJ, Rubin LJ, Badesch D, Fleming T, Parpia T,
Burgess G, Branzi A, Grimminger F, Kurzyna M, Simonneau G, Sildenafil Use in Pulmonary
Arterial Hypertension Study G. Sildenafil citrate therapy for pulmonary arterial hypertension. N
Engl J Med. 2005;353:2148-2157.
25. Galie N, Brundage BH, Ghofrani HA, Oudiz RJ, Simonneau G, Safdar Z, Shapiro S, White
RJ, Chan M, Beardsworth A, Frumkin L, Barst RJ. Tadalafil therapy for pulmonary arterial
hypertension. Circulation. 2009;119:2894-U2865.
26. Klebanoff MA, Cole SR. Use of multiple imputation in the epidemiologic literature. Am J
Epidemiol. 2008;168:355-357.
16
Downloaded from http://circ.ahajournals.org/ by guest on July 11, 2016
DOI: 10.1161/CIRCULATIONAHA.112.105890
27. SAS version 9.2, SAS Institute Inc., Cary, NC.
28. Freedman LS, Graubard BI, Schatzkin A. Statistical validation of intermediate end-points for
chronic diseases. Stat Med. 1992;11:167-178.
29. Huang J, Huang B. Evaluating the proportion of treatment effect explained by a continuous
surrogate marker in logistic or probit regression models. Stat Biopharm Res. 2010;2:229-238
30. Efron B, Tibshirani RJ. An introduction to the bootstrap. New York: Chapman and Hall;
1993.
31. Jasti S, Dudley WN, Goldwater E. Sas macros for testing statistical mediation in data with
binary mediators or outcomes. Nurs Res. 2008;57:118-122.
32. Gabler NB, French B, Strom BL, Liu Z, Palevsky HI, Taichman DB, Kawut SM, Halpern
SD. Race and sex differences in response to endothelin receptor antagonists for pulmonary
arterial hypertension. Chest. 2012; 141:20-26.
Outcome
33. Kuhn KP, Byrne DW, Arbogast PG, Doyle TP, Loyd JE, Robbins IM. Outco
ome inn 91
epoprostenol.
Respir
consecutive patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension receiving epoprostenol
ol. Am J R
Res
espi
pir
ir
Crit Care Med. 2003;167:580-586.
34.
Lassere
MN.. The
evaluation
34
4. La
Las
sserre MN
sser
M
Th biomarker-surrogacy evalua
uatiion schema: A rreview
ua
evie
ieew of
o the biomarkersurrogate
literature
proposal
criterion-based,
quantitative,
multidimensional
urrrogate li
lite
teera
r tu
ture
re aand
ndd a ppro
r poosa
ro
sall fo
forr a cr
crit
iter
erio
ionn-ba
based,
ba
d,, qqua
uant
ua
n ittat
ativve, m
u tidi
ul
dime
mens
me
n io
ns
iona
nall
levels
schema
status
hhierarchical
hier
i rar
a chical lev
evel
e s off eevidence
viide
denc
ncee sc
nc
sche
hema
he
ma ffor
or eevaluating
vaaluaatinng tthe
hee sst
tattus of bbiomarkers
iom
marke
keerss aass su
ssurrogate
r og
rr
ogat
atee
at
endpoints.
en
ndppoints. St
Stat
a Methods
Methoods Med
Meed Res.
M
Ress. 20
22008;17:303-340.
08;1
; 7:30
303-3440.
30
0.
Holland
six-minute
walk
test:
35. Rasekaba
Rasekkaba
Ra
b T,
T, Lee
Leee AL,
A , Naughton
AL
Naug
Na
ught
hton
o MT,
T, Williams
Wil
Williiam
ams TJ,
TJJ, Ho
Holl
llan
andd AE
AE.. Th
The si
sixx mi
minu
nute
t w
alkk te
test
st: A
cardiopulmonary
Med
2009;39:495-501.
useful metricc fo
forr th
thee ca
card
r io
opu
pulm
mon
o ar
aryy pa
ppatient.
tien
ti
entt.
en
t. In
IIntern
tern
te
rnn M
ed JJ.. 20
2009
0 ;3
09
39:
9:49
49549
5 50
55 1.
1
36. Echt DS, Liebson PR, Mitchell LB, Peters RW, Obias-Manno D, Barker AH, Arensberg D,
Baker A, Friedman L, Greene HL, Huther ML, Richardson DW, and the CAST Investigators.
Mortality and morbidity in patients receiving encainide, flecainide, or placebo. The cardiac
arrhythmia suppression trial. N Engl J Med. 1991;324:781-788.
37. du Bois RM, Weycker D, Albera C, Bradford WZ, Costabel U, Kartashov A, Lancaster L,
Noble PW, Sahn SA, Szwarcberg J, Thomeer M, Valeyre D, King TE, Jr. Six-minute-walk test
in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis: Test validation and minimal clinically important difference. Am
J Respir Crit Care Med. 2011;183:1231-1237.
38. Redelmeier DA, Bayoumi AM, Goldstein RS, Guyatt GH. Interpreting small differences in
functional status: The six minute walk test in chronic lung disease patients. Am J Respir Crit
Care Med. 1997;155:1278-1282.
39. Hamilton DM, Haennel RG. Validity and reliability of the 6-minute walk test in a cardiac
rehabilitation population. J Cardiopulm Rehabil. 2000;20:156-164.
17
Downloaded from http://circ.ahajournals.org/ by guest on July 11, 2016
DOI: 10.1161/CIRCULATIONAHA.112.105890
40. Fleming TR, DeMets DL. Surrogate end points in clinical trials: Are we being misled? Ann
Intern Med. 1996;125:605-613.
41. Gilbert C, Brown MC, Cappelleri JC, Carlsson M, McKenna SP. Estimating a minimally
important difference in pulmonary arterial hypertension following treatment with sildenafil.
Chest. 2009;135:137-142.
42. Paciocco G, Martinez FJ, Bossone E, Pielsticker E, Gillespie B, Rubenfire M. Oxygen
desaturation on the six-minute walk test and mortality in untreated primary pulmonary
hypertension. Eur Respir J. 2001;17:647-652.
43. Buyse M, Molenberghs G, Burzykowski T, Renard D, Geys H. The validation of surrogate
endpoints in meta-analyses of randomized experiments. Biostatistics. 2000;1:49-67.
44. Halpern SD, Doyle R, Kawut SM. The ethics of randomized clinical trials in pulmonary
arterial hypertension. Proc Am Thorac Soc. 2008;5:631-635.
18
Downloaded from http://circ.ahajournals.org/ by guest on July 11, 2016
DOI: 10.1161/CIRCULATIONAHA.112.105890
Table 1. Characteristics of study participants; summaries provided as median (Q1-Q3) unless
otherwise indicated by n (%).
Characteristic
Age, years
Male, n (%)
Race, n (%)
White
Black
Other
Height, cm
Weight, kg
BMI, kg/m2
PAH diagnosis, n (%)
Idiopathic
Connective tissue disease
HIV infection / anorexigen use
Congenital heart disease
NYHA functional classification, n (%)
I/II
III/IV
Baseline hemodynamics
M
eann ri
ea
rright
ghtt at
gh
tri
rial
a ppressure,
al
ressure, mmHg
Mean
atrial
Mea
M
ean pu
ulm
monnar
ary
y arterial pressure, mmHg
Mean
pulmonary
Cardiac ooutput,
utpu
ut
putt, L
pu
/m
min
Cardiac
L/min
Cardiac
index,
L/min/m
C
ardiac ind
dex
x, L
/m
min//m2
Pulmonary
capillary
wedge
mmHg
Pulmonaary
y ca
apillary
yw
ed
dge
ge ppressure,
resssur
re
urre, m
mH
Hg
Pulmonary
resistance,
Wood
Units
Pul
P
ulmo
ul
mona
narry
na
ry vvascular
asccula
cularr re
esi
sist
s an
ncee, W
ood Un
ood
Unit
itss
it
Baseline
Ba
ase
seli
line
in laboratory
lab
laborrat
atory
y values
valluess
va
Hemoglobin,
g/dL
Hemoglo
H
lobi
bin,
n,, g
g/d
/dL
L
Sodium,
mEq/L
Sod
S
odiu
ium,
m, mEq
m
Eq//L
/L
Warfarin use, n (%)
Baseline 6MWD, m
Study, n (%)
ARIES-1
ARIES-2
BREATHE-1
AIR
SUPER
STRIDE-1
STRIDE-2
STRIDE-4
PHIRST
Treprostinil
Active treatment
(n=1563)
50 (38-61)
335 (21)
Placebo
(n=841)
49 (37-60)
192 (23)
1244 (80)
86 (6)
221 (14)
163 (157-169)
69.4 (59.0-82.1)
25.5 (22.5-30.0)
678 (81)
39 (5)
118 (14)
163 (157-170)
70.1 (60.6-83.9)
26.1 (22.9-30.4)
946 (62)
388 (25)
41 (3)
155 (10)
508 (62)
193 (24)
18 (2)
(12)
97 ((12
12))
628 (41)
917 (59)
389
38
9 (4
(47)
7)
432 (53)
8.0 (5.0-12.0)
0))
52.0 (43.0
.0-62
.0
2.0
0)
(43.0-62.0)
4.0 (3
4.0
3.2
.2-5
-5.1
5.1
. )
(3.2-5.1)
22.4
.4
4 (1
((1.9-3.1)
.9--3.1))
(6.0-12.0)
99.0
.0
0 (6.
.0-12.0))
(7.1-16.8)
10.99 ((7
10
7.1--16
16.8
8)
88.0
.0 (5.0-12.0)
54.0 ((45.0-64.5)
45.0-64.5)
3.9
3.
9 (3
(3.2
.2-4
.2
-4.9
.9)
9)
(3.2-4.9)
2.
2.3
.3 ((1.9-3.1)
1.9
9-3
-3..1)
99.0
.00 ((6.0-12.0)
6.0
0-12..0))
111.2
1.2 (7.5
1.2
((7.5-16.0)
7 5-1
-166.0)
0)
14.7 ((13.4-16.0)
14.7
13.4
13
.4-1
-1
16.
6.0)
0))
140
14
40 (138-142)
(138
(1
38-1
-142
42))
42
860 (59)
356 (287-408)
(13.3-16.0)
114.6
14.
4.6
6 (1
(13
3.3
3-16
16.0)
0)
140
14
40 (138-142)
(138
(1
38-1
142
42))
470 (64)
352 (276-410)
134 (9)
127 (8)
145 (9)
101 (6)
204 (13)
118 (8)
123 (8)
64 (4)
314 (20)
233 (15)
67 (8)
65 (8)
69 (8)
101 (12)
65 (8)
60 (7)
62 (7)
34 (4)
81 (10)
237 (28)
BMI, body mass index; HIV, human immunodeficiency virus; NYHA, New York Heart Association ; ARIES,
Ambrisentan in Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension, Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled, Multicenter,
Efficacy Studies; AIR, Aerosolized Iloprost Randomized;BREATHE, Bosentan: Randomized Trial of Endothelin
receptor Antagonist Therapy; STRIDE, Sitaxsentan To Relieve Impaired Exercise; SUPER, Sildenafil Use in
Pulmonary Hypertension; PHIRST, Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension and Response to Tadalafil
19
Downloaded from http://circ.ahajournals.org/ by guest on July 11, 2016
DOI: 10.1161/CIRCULATIONAHA.112.105890
Table 2. Characteristics of participating studies and drug/dose combinations
Study
Drug and dose
N
Ambrisentan 5 mg
Ambrisentan 10 mg
Placebo
67
67
67
ARIES-1
ARIES-2
Clinical
events
10
Study Level Statistics
% NYHA
% female % black
III/IV
84
7.3
65
% CTD
31
20
74
0
54
32
9
79
7.1
100
22
41
67
1.5
100
23
7
79
8.1
67
2244
8
77
13.1
13
63
29
2
84
84
6.7
67
6.
39
1155
17
76
2.6
61
30
39
78
9.7
67
24
45
81
5.3
7
19
Ambrisentan 2.5 mg 64
Ambrisentan 5 mg
63
Placebo
65
BREATHE-1
Bosentan 125 mg
Bosentan 250 mg
Placebo
75
70
69
Iloprost
Placebo
101
101
Sitaxsentan 100 mg
Sitaxsentan 300 mg
Placebo
Pla
laace
cebo
b
55
63
60
AIR
STRIDE-1
STRIDE-2
ST
TRI
RID
DE 2
DE-2
Sitaxsentan
Sita
Si
taxs
ta
x en
xs
enta
tan
ta
n 50 mg
mg
Sitaxsentan
Sittax
Si
xsen
enta
tan
n 100
100 mg
mg
Placebo
Pla
acebo
61
662
2
662
2
Sitaxsentan
Sitaxs
Si
xsen
entan
n 50
5 mg
mg
Sitaxsentan
Sita
Si
taxs
xsen
enta
tan
n 10
100
0 mg
g
Placebo
P
lacebo
lace
b
bo
32
32
3
2
334
4
Sildenafil 20 mg
Sildenafil 40 mg
Sildenafil 80 mg
Placebo
68
65
71
65
STRIDE-4
ST
TRI
R DE
DE-4
-4
SUPER
PHIRST
Tadalafil 2.5 mg
Tadalafil 10 mg
Tadalafil 20 mg
Tadalafil 40 mg
Placebo
79
79
81
75
81
Treprostinil
Treprostinil
Placebo
233
237
20
Downloaded from http://circ.ahajournals.org/ by guest on July 11, 2016
DOI: 10.1161/CIRCULATIONAHA.112.105890
Table 3. Criteria to establish change in 6MWD as a mediator
Criteria to establish '6MWD as a mediator in the relationship
Results*
between treatment assignment and development of a clinical event
at 12-weeks follow-up
Mean difference: 22.4
Treatment assignment has a significant effect on '6MWD from
(95% CI: 15.9, 28.9)
baseline to 12-weeks follow up
Odds ratio: 0.89 per ten meters
'6MWD has a significant effect on the odds of developing a
(95% CI: 0.87, 0.91)
clinical event
Treatment assignment has a significant effect on the odds of
Odds ratio: 0.43
developing a clinical event at 12-weeks follow-up
(95% CI: 0.31, 0.59)
The effect of treatment assignment on the odds of developing a
Odds ratio: 0.52
clinical event (compare with above) is attenuated with the addition
(95% CI: 0.37, 0.73)
of '6MWD to the model
* All models include adjustment for study and baseline walk; assignment to placebo is the reference for all models
that included treatment.
Table 4. Drug/dose-specific placebo-adjusted results
Study
Drug and dose
ARIES-1
AR
RIE
IES
S-1
S-1
Am
Ambrisentan
5 mg
Ambrisentan
A
Am
bris
br
isen
is
enta
en
tann 100 mg
ta
mg
Ambrisentan
A
Ambr
mbr
bris
iseenta
enta
tann 2.5
2.5 mg
A
Ambrisentan
mbrriseentaan 5 mgg
B
Bosentan
ose
senntaan
an 125
255 m
mg
g
Bosentan
mg
Bose
Bo
seent
ntan
an 250
250
0m
g
Ilop
Il
Iloprost
opro
op
rost
ro
st
Sitaxsentan
mg
S
itax
it
axse
ax
sent
n an
nt
n 1100
0 m
00
g
Sit
Si
Sitaxsentan
t 30
3000 mg
Sitaxsentan 50 mg
Sitaxsentan 100 mg
Sitaxsentan 50 mg
Sitaxsentan 100 mg
Sildenafil 20 mg
Sildenafil 40 mg
Sildenafil 80 mg
Tadalafil 2.5 mg
Tadalafil 10 mg
Tadalafil 20 mg
Tadalafil 40 mg
Treprostinil
ARIES-2
A
RIIES-2
IE
BR
BREATHE-1
REA
ATH
THEE1
AIR
AI
R
STRIDE-1
STRIDE-2
STRIDE-4
SUPER
PHIRST
Difference in '6MWD,
m (95% CI)
OR for clinical
events (95% CI)
Meta regression
weight
24.9 (0.32,
(0.3
(0
.322, 49.4)
41.4
41.4 (15.6,
((155.66, 67.2)
67.2
.2)
2)
37.3
(8.2,
337
7.3 (8
8.2
2, 66.3)
66
6.3
3)
53.6
53..6 (24.4,
(2
24.
4.44, 82.8)
82.
2.8)
8)
33.4
33
4 ((8.6,
8.66,
6, 558.3)
8.33)
8.
3)
46.3
(21.1,
71.6)
46
.3
3 ((21
21.1,
1, 71
1.6
.6)
6)
24
24.5
.5
5 ((-2.4,
-22.4,
4 51
51.3)
.3)
3)
33.3
33
.3
3 ((9.1,
9 1,
9.
1 57.4)
57..4)
224.6
4 6 ((-0.45,
0 45 49
49.7)
7)
-7.1 (-27.6, 13.5)
15.2 (-4.7, 35.1)
-19.1 (-49.9, 11.8)
6.9 (-23.5, 37.5)
39.3 (15.0, 63.6)
45.2 (20.6, 69.8)
42.1 (18.0, 66.3)
-0.3 (-20.7, 20.0)
17.1 (-4.3, 38.5)
24.6 (5.1, 44.1)
18.2 (-2.2, 38.6)
9.9 (-6.7, 26.4)
22.4 (17.4, 27.5)
00.58
. 8 (0
.5
(0.13,
0.1
.13
13, 2.53)
0.38
0.38 ((0.
(0.07,
0.07
0 , 2.
07
2.04
2.04)
04
4)
1.12)
0.35
0.
35 ((0.11,
0 111, 1.
0.
.122)
0.22
0.22 (0
(0.06,
0.0
06, 00.88)
.8
88)
00.58
.58 (0
(0.12
(0.12,
2, 22.80)
.80)
.8
0
0)
00.42
0.
.42
42 ((0.07,
0 07
0.
07,, 22.47)
.47
47))
47
0.47
0.47
47 ((0
(0.23,
0.23
23, 00.96)
23
.96
96))
96
(0.02,
00.20
.220 (0
(0.0
.0
02,
2 11.99)
.99)
.9
9)
00.36
36 ((0.06,
0 06 22.15)
15))
15
0.54 (0.09, 3.20)
0.77 (0.13, 4.72)
0.71 (0, 4.42) *
0.73 (0, 2.07) *
0.36 (0.09, 1.47)
0.25 (0.05, 1.28)
0.59 (0.17, 1.98)
0.49 (0.18, 1.34)
0.30 (0.10, 0.90)
0.59 (0.23, 1.51)
0.27 (0.08, 0.90)
0.52 (0.27, 0.99)
0.44 (0.33, 0.57)
1.8
1.
1.4
.4
22.8
2.
.88
2.1
11.5
.5
11.2
1.
2
77.3
.33
00.7
.7
11.2
2
1.2
1.2
< 0.1
< 0.1
1.9
1.5
2.6
3.8
3.1
4.4
2.7
9.2
Treprostinil
Summary †
CI, confidence interval
Reference group is the placebo group in each study
All analyses are adjusted for baseline walk distance
* Obtained from exact logistic regression
† Obtained from fixed-effects meta-analysis (p-value for heterogeneity = 0.99)
21
Downloaded from http://circ.ahajournals.org/ by guest on July 11, 2016
DOI: 10.1161/CIRCULATIONAHA.112.105890
Figure Legend:
Figure. Results of the meta-regression analysis showing the relationship between changes in
6MWD between baseline and 12-weeks follow-up at the drug/dose level by study on the odds of
a clinical event at 12-weeks. The circles each represent a drug/dose combination, with sizes
proportionate to study weights (detailed in Table 4, and based on inverse variance weighting).
The shaded grey area corresponds to the bounds of the 95% prediction intervals. The threshold
value is indicated on the horizontal axis at 41.8 m.
22
Downloaded from http://circ.ahajournals.org/ by guest on July 11, 2016
Downloaded from http://circ.ahajournals.org/ by guest on July 11, 2016
Validation of Six-Minute-Walk Distance as a Surrogate Endpoint in Pulmonary Arterial
Hypertension Trials
Nicole B. Gabler, Benjamin French, Brian L. Strom, Harold I. Palevsky, Darren B. Taichman, Steven
M. Kawut and Scott D. Halpern
Circulation. published online June 13, 2012;
Circulation is published by the American Heart Association, 7272 Greenville Avenue, Dallas, TX 75231
Copyright © 2012 American Heart Association, Inc. All rights reserved.
Print ISSN: 0009-7322. Online ISSN: 1524-4539
The online version of this article, along with updated information and services, is located on the
World Wide Web at:
http://circ.ahajournals.org/content/early/2012/06/11/CIRCULATIONAHA.112.105890
Data Supplement (unedited) at:
http://circ.ahajournals.org/content/suppl/2012/06/11/CIRCULATIONAHA.112.105890.DC1.html
http://circ.ahajournals.org/content/suppl/2013/10/02/CIRCULATIONAHA.112.105890.DC2.html
Permissions: Requests for permissions to reproduce figures, tables, or portions of articles originally published in
Circulation can be obtained via RightsLink, a service of the Copyright Clearance Center, not the Editorial Office.
Once the online version of the published article for which permission is being requested is located, click Request
Permissions in the middle column of the Web page under Services. Further information about this process is
available in the Permissions and Rights Question and Answer document.
Reprints: Information about reprints can be found online at:
http://www.lww.com/reprints
Subscriptions: Information about subscribing to Circulation is online at:
http://circ.ahajournals.org//subscriptions/
Downloaded from http://circ.ahajournals.org/ by guest on July 11, 2016
SUPPLEMENTAL MATERIAL:
(1) Supplemental Table 1: Clinical event definitions by study
Study name:
Clinical event definition:
- Death
- Lung or heart transplantation
- Hospitalization for PAH
- Refractory systolic arterial hypotension
AIR
- Worsening right heart failure
- Rapidly progressive cardiogenic, hepatic or renal failure
- Addition of new PAH medication
- A decline in measure of hemodynamic function
ARIES-I
ARIES-II
BREATHE-1
PHIRST
STRIDE-I
STRIDE-II
- Death
- Lung transplantation
- Hospitalization for PAH
- Atrial septostomy
- Addition of other PAH therapeutic agents
- An increase of 1 or more WHO functional class
- Worsening right ventricular failure
- Rapidly progressing cardiogenic, hepatic, or renal failure
- Refractory systolic hypotension
- Death
- Lung transplantation
- Hospitalization for PAH
- Atrial septostomy
- Addition of other PAH therapeutic agents
- An increase of 1 or more WHO functional class
- Worsening right ventricular failure
- Rapidly progressing cardiogenic, hepatic, or renal failure
- Refractory systolic hypotension
- Death
- Lung transplantation
- Hospitalization for worsening PAH
- Atrial septostomy
- Lack of clinical improvement leading to discontinuation
- Need for epoprostenol therapy
- Death
- Lung transplantation
- Atrial septostomy
- Hospitalization due to worsening PAH
- Initiation of new PAH therapy
- Worsening WHO functional class
- Death
- Epoprostenol use
- Atrial septostomy
- Need for lung transplantation
- Death
- Hospitalization for worsening PAH
STRIDE-IV
SUPER
Treprostinil
- Atrial septostomy
- Need for heart/lung or lung transplantation
- Addition of any new type of chronic PAH treatment due to worsening
PAH
- Death
- Hospitalization for worsening PAH
- Need for heart/lung or lung transplantation
- Atrial septostomy
- Addition of any new type of chronic PAH treatment due to worsening
PAH
- Death
- Hospitalization due to worsening PAH
- Lung transplantation
- Addition of additional medication due to worsening PAH
- Death
- Lung transplantation
- Clinical deterioration
(2) Results of sensitivity analysis removing NYHA class IV patients.
Our data included 127 (5%) patients who were NYHA class IV. These patients accounted for 25
(13%) of the clinical events. Removing the NYHA class IV patients does not appreciably
change any of the results (Supplemental Table 1). The proportion of the effect of treatment on
the odds of developing a clinical event at 12 weeks that was explained by ∆6MWD was 20.4%
(95% CI: 9.8% to 30.3%) after removing these patients, rather than 22.1% among the full cohort.
Additionally, we found a threshold effect value of 49.3 m, slightly larger than the threshold
effect of 41.8 m found among the full cohort.
Supplemental Table 2: Criteria to establish ∆6MWD as a mediator, data excludes NYHA class IV
patients
Criteria to establish ∆6MWD as a mediator in the relationship
between treatment assignment and development of a clinical
event at 12-weeks follow-up
Results
Treatment assignment has a significant effect on ∆6MWD
from baseline to 12-weeks follow-up
Mean difference: 22.5
∆6MWD has a significant effect on the odds of developing a
clinical event
Odds ratio: 0.89 per 10 m
Treatment assignment has a significant effect on the odds of
developing a clinical event as 12-weeks follow-up
Odds ratio: 0.39
The effect of treatment assignment on the odds of developing a
clinical event (compare with above) is attenuated with the
addition of ∆6MWD to the model
(95% CI: 15.9, 29.1)
(95% CI: 0.87, 0.91)
(95% CI: 0.28, 0.55)
Odds ratio: 0.48
(95% CI: 0.33, 0.68)
(3) Results of sensitivity analysis removing patients participating in the PHIRST trial.
Removing the PHIRST patients from the mediation analysis did not change the results reported
in the manuscript (Supplemental Table 2). The proportion of the effect of treatment on the odds
of developing a clinical event at 12 weeks that was explained by ∆6MWD was 24.6% (95% CI:
12.1% to 37.1%), compared with 22.1%.
Supplemental Table 3: Criteria to establish ∆6MWD as a mediator, data excludes PHIRST trial
Criteria to establish ∆6MWD as a mediator in the relationship
between treatment assignment and development of a clinical event
at 12-weeks follow-up
Results
Treatment assignment has a significant effect on ∆6MWD from
baseline to 12-weeks follow-up
Mean difference: 23.3
(95% CI: 16.0, 30.7)
∆6MWD has a significant effect on the odds of developing a
clinical event
Odds ratio: 0.88 per 10 m
(95% CI: 0.86, 0.90)
Treatment assignment has a significant effect on the odds of
developing a clinical event at 12-weeks follow-up
Odds ratio: 0.43
(95% CI: 0.31, 0.62)
The effect of treatment assignment on the odds of developing a
clinical event (compare with above) is attenuated with the addition
of ∆6MWD to the model
Odds ratio: 0.53
(95% CI: 0.36, 0.78)
As reported in the manuscript, excluding this study resulted in a smaller threshold value of 25.7
meters.
Artículo original
Validación de la distancia recorrida en 6 minutos
como variable de valoración sustitutiva en los ensayos
realizados en la hipertensión arterial pulmonar
Nicole B. Gabler, PhD, MPH, MHA; Benjamin French, PhD; Brian L. Strom, MD, MPH;
Harold I. Palevsky, MD; Darren B. Taichman, MD, PhD; Steven M. Kawut, MD, MS;
Scott D. Halpern, MD, PhD
Antecedentes—Casi todos los tratamientos existentes para la hipertensión arterial pulmonar han sido aprobados basándose en
el cambio producido en la distancia recorrida en 6 minutos (Δ6MWD) como variable de valoración clínicamente importante, pero no se ha demostrado nunca la validez de esta variable de valoración sustitutiva. El objetivo de este análisis fue
validar la diferencia del Δ6MWD respecto a la probabilidad de aparición de un evento clínico en los ensayos realizados en
la hipertensión arterial pulmonar.
Métodos y resultados—En primer lugar, con objeto de determinar si el Δ6MWD entre la situación basal y el examen realizado al cabo de 12 semanas intervenía en la relación entre la asignación del tratamiento y la aparición de eventos clínicos,
llevamos a cabo un análisis combinado de los datos a nivel de paciente, de 10 ensayos controlados con placebo y aleatorizados presentados anteriormente a la Food and Drug Administration de EEUU (n = 2.404 pacientes). En segundo lugar,
para identificar un efecto umbral en el Δ6MWD que indicara una reducción estadísticamente significativa de los eventos
clínicos, llevamos a cabo una metarregresión en 21 combinaciones de fármacos/niveles de dosis. El Δ6MWD explicó el
22,1% (intervalo de confianza del 95%, 12,1%– 31,1%) del efecto del tratamiento (p < 0,001). El metanálisis mostró una
diferencia media de Δ6MWD de 22,4 m (intervalo de confianza del 95%, 17,4 –27,5 m), favorable al tratamiento activo en
comparación con placebo. El tratamiento activo redujo la probabilidad de un evento clínico (odds ratio de resumen, 0,44;
intervalo de confianza del 95%, 0,33– 0,57). La metarregresión puso de relieve la existencia de un efecto umbral significativo para un valor de 41,8 m.
Conclusiones—Nuestros resultados sugieren que el Δ6MWD no explica una gran parte del efecto del tratamiento, tiene una validez tan solo modesta como variable de valoración sustitutiva de los eventos clínicos, y puede no ser un parámetro de valoración
sustitutivo suficiente. Serán necesarias nuevas investigaciones para determinar si el valor umbral de 41,8 m es válido para los
resultados a largo plazo o si difiere en los distintos ensayos que utilizan el tratamiento de base o carecen por completo de controles con placebo. (Traducido del inglés: Validation of 6-Minute Walk Distance as a Surrogate End Point in Pulmonary
Arterial Hypertension Trials. Circulation. 2012;126:349-356.)
Palabras clave: hypertension, pulmonary ■ meta-analysis ■ statistics ■ trials
L
a hipertensión arterial pulmonar (HAP) es una enfermedad
progresiva que lleva a la insuficiencia cardiaca derecha y
a la muerte1,2. Siete fármacos desarrollados en los últimos 20
años han resultado eficaces para mejorar la distancia recorrida
en 6 minutos (6MWD) en los pacientes con HAP y basándose
en ello, han sido autorizados para su uso en EEUU. Aunque
la 6MWD es considerada por los organismos reguladores una
variable de valoración clínicamente importante de por sí, varios
estudios han indicado que los pacientes que alcanzan una mayor
mejora de la 6MWD (o que llegan a determinados valores absolutos de la 6MWD) presentan mejores resultados clínicos3–5;
sin embargo, estos datos observacionales son insuficientes para
determinar si la 6MWD constituye o no una variable de valoración válida sustitutiva de los eventos clínicos6–9.
Recibido el 9 de diciembre de 2011; aceptado el 16 de mayo de 2012.
Center for Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics and Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology (N.B.G., B.F., B.L.S., S.M.K., S.D.H.); Leonard
Davis Institute of Health Economics (B.F., B.L.S., S.D.H.); Pulmonary, Allergy, and Critical Care Division (H.I.P., D.B.T., S.M.K., S.D.H.); y Pulmonary
Vascular Disease Program of the Penn Cardiovascular Institute (H.I.P., D.B.T., S.M.K., S.D.H.), Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania,
Filadelfia, PA.
El suplemento de datos de este artículo, disponible solamente online, puede consultarse en http://circ.ahajournals.org/lookup/suppl/doi:10.1161/
CIRCULATIONAHA.112.105890/-/DC1.
Remitir la correspondencia a Nicole B. Gabler, PhD, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, 708 Blockley Hall, 423 Guardian Dr,
Philadelphia, PA 19104-6021, EEUU. Correo electrónico gabler@upenn.edu
© 2012 American Heart Association, Inc.
Puede accederse a la versión original de Circulation en http://circ.ahajournals.org 4
DOI:10.1161/CIRCULATIONAHA.112.105890
Gabler y cols. Validación de la distancia recorrida en 6 minutos 5
Véase la Editorial en la página 1
Véase la Perspectiva Clínica en la página 12
La determinación de la validez de la 6MWD como variable
de valoración sustitutiva en los ensayos realizados en la HAP
es especialmente oportuna teniendo en cuenta los resultados
contradictorios obtenidos en metanálisis recientes10–13. Aunque
algunas de estas contradicciones pueden deberse a un tamaño
muestral o un seguimiento insuficiente o a limitaciones intrínsecas de los metanálisis realizados a nivel de estudios, estas
diferencias sugieren también la posibilidad de que la 6WMD
sea una mala variable sustitutiva indirecta. En el presente estudio, hemos utilizado 2 enfoques complementarios para validar
la 6MWD14–17. En primer lugar, empleamos los datos procedentes de pacientes de todos los ensayos clínicos aleatorizados
de fase 3, existentes, y presentados para la aprobación de fármacos, con objeto de determinar si los cambios de la 6MWD
(Δ6MWD) intervienen en la relación entre la asignación del
tratamiento y los resultados clínicos. En segundo lugar, cuantificamos el grado en el que los efectos del tratamiento sobre el
Δ6MWD predecía los efectos del tratamiento sobre los resultados centrados en el paciente, con el objetivo de determinar
si existe un umbral del Δ6MWD que en caso de ser superado
permita a los investigadores predecir que se producirán unos
resultados clínicos superiores en futuros ensayos.
Métodos
Población en estudio
A través de un contrato de la Food and Drug Administration (FDA)
de EEUU con uno de los autores (S.D.H.), obtuvimos los datos de
los pacientes individuales desidentificados de todos los participantes
en ensayos aleatorizados y controlados con placebo de fase 3 presentados a la FDA hasta 2008 en los que se evaluaron prostanoides,
antagonistas de los receptores de la endotelina o inhibidores de la
fosfodiesterasa. En once ensayos clínicos se examinaron 7 fármacos
(ambrisentán, bosentán, sitaxentán, iloprost, treprostinilo, sildenafilo
y tadalafilo). Excluimos 1 estudio (ensayo BREATHE-2, el Bosentan
Randomized Trial of Endothelin Antagonist Therapy for HAP) por
que incluía tan solo 33 participantes y no era un ensayo de fase 3. Se
ha presentado información adicional de los ensayos en otras publicaciones18–25. Incluimos intencionadamente ensayos de tratamientos
que no fueron aprobados por la FDA (por ejemplo, sitaxentán) a causa
de una toxicidad inaceptable con las dosis efectivas o del uso de dosis que se determinó que no eran efectivas. Tanto en los análisis de
mediador como los de umbral cabría prever un sesgo si incluyéramos
tan solo los tratamientos aprobados por la FDA, y las conclusiones
obtenidas no serían útiles para el diseño de futuros ensayos ni para las
decisiones de las autoridades reguladoras. Todos los ensayos incluidos describían una metodología similar, incluida la evaluación de los
resultados y la obtención de datos en un seguimiento de 12 semanas.
Eventos clínicos
Los eventos clínicos fueron cualquiera de los siguientes antes del final del ensayo: muerte, trasplante de pulmón, septostomía auricular,
hospitalización a causa de agravamiento de la HAP, abandono por
agravamiento de insuficiencia cardiaca derecha o adición de otras
medicaciones para la HAP. No consideramos que un deterioro de la
6MWD constituyera un evento clínico, ya que esta era la variable
de valoración sustitutiva que pretendíamos validar. Se presenta una
información adicional en la Tabla I del Suplemento de Datos Online.
Distancia recorrida en seis minutos
El cambio de la 6MWD se calculó mediante la diferencia en metros
entre la distancia recorrida en la situación basal y la observada a las
12 semanas. La 6MWD basal se registró a las 2 semanas de la asignación aleatoria o dentro de este periodo de tiempo. En todos los análisis, a los pacientes para los que no se dispuso de la 6WMD a las 12
semanas porque habían fallecido durante el ensayo (n = 45, 2%) se les
asignó un valor de 0. Optamos por ese valor para reflejar el hecho de
que las muertes son eventos clínicos de extraordinaria importancia y
para mantener la uniformidad con la medida empleada en la mayoría
de los ensayos incluidos en nuestro análisis. Utilizamos imputaciones
múltiples26 para los valores de los pacientes que sobrevivieron pero
para los que no se dispuso de la 6MWD a las 12 semanas (n = 182,
8%). El modelo de imputación incluía variables asociadas a los eventos clínicos, es decir: 6MWD basal, edad, sexo, peso, raza, altura,
categoría diagnóstica (idiopática, enfermedad del tejido conjuntivo,
infección por VIH/uso de anorexígenos o cardiopatía congénita),
6MWD en el seguimiento a las 4 o 6 semanas, clasificación funcional
de la New York Heart Association (NYHA), uso de warfarina, sodio
basal, gasto cardiaco y presión arterial pulmonar media. Se imputaron cinco conjuntos de datos. Todas las imputaciones se llevaron a
cabo en el programa SAS versión 9.2.
Análisis de mediador
Utilizamos una metodología estándar para determinar si el Δ6MWD
interviene en la relación entre la asignación del tratamiento y la aparición de eventos clínicos en el seguimiento de 12 semanas15,16. Definimos la asignación del tratamiento como tratamiento activo o placebo.
Realizamos un análisis de regresión para evaluar las siguientes 4 hipótesis: (1) La asignación del tratamiento tiene un efecto significativo sobre el Δ6WMD a las 12 semanas respecto al valor basal. (2) El
Δ6MWD tiene un efecto significativo sobre la probabilidad de sufrir
un evento clínico. (3) La asignación del tratamiento tiene un efecto
significativo sobre la probabilidad de sufrir un evento clínico. (4) El
efecto de la asignación del tratamiento sobre la probabilidad de sufrir
un evento clínico se atenúa cuando se añade al modelo el Δ6MWD.
Era necesario rechazar la hipótesis nula en los 4 casos para respaldar
el papel del Δ6MWD como mediador/variable de valoración sustitutiva.
Utilizamos una regresión logística o lineal para los parámetros binarios y continuos, respectivamente. En todos los modelos de regresión
se introdujo un ajuste respecto al estudio con objeto de tener en cuenta
las diferencias existentes a nivel de estudio en la asignación del tratamiento y respecto a la distancia recorrida basal para tener en cuenta
las diferencias existentes a nivel de paciente en el riesgo de eventos
clínicos. No se aplicó ningún otro ajuste, ya que los pacientes fueron
asignados aleatoriamente a los grupos de tratamiento o placebo.
Tras rechazar la hipótesis nula para las 4 hipótesis indicadas,
determinamos la parte de la variabilidad que se explicaba por el
Δ6MWD en la relación entre la asignación del tratamiento y la aparición de un evento clínico27,28. Utilizamos un modelo lineal generalizado con una función de enlace logit (Logit link) para cuantificar la
relación entre la asignación del tratamiento y la log-odds (logit de
la probabilidad de presentar un evento clínico), con un ajuste respecto
al estudio y a la distancia recorrida en la situación basal (modelo “reducido”). A continuación añadimos al modelo el Δ6MWD (modelo
“completo”). El posterior cambio del coeficiente de asignación de
tratamiento entre los modelos reducido y completo indicó la parte
de la variabilidad explicada por el Δ6MWD. Se utilizó un método de
remuestreo bootstrap para establecer un intervalo de confianza (IC)
del cambio porcentual. Se obtuvieron estimaciones del cambio porcentual para cada conjunto de datos de remuestreo, y se utilizó la
desviación estándar de las estimaciones realizadas en 1.000 conjuntos
de datos de remuestreo como error estándar29.
6 Circulation Enero, 2013
Además, utilizamos una prueba de Sobel modificada para determinar si la cantidad de mediación era estadísticamente significativa;
la prueba modificada tenía en cuenta el hecho de que la variable de
valoración sustitutiva (continua) y el resultado clínico (binario) se
expresaban en escalas diferentes16,30. Evaluamos el supuesto de que
no hubiera ninguna modificación del efecto entre el tratamiento y el
mediador30 mediante un ajuste de un modelo de regresión logística
para los eventos clínicos, con un término de interacción entre la asignación del tratamiento y el Δ6MWD.
Análisis de efecto umbral
A continuación realizamos un metanálisis y metarregresión a nivel de
ensayo para determinar la relación del efecto del tratamiento sobre el
mediador (Δ6MWD) con el efecto del tratamiento sobre la probabilidad de sufrir un evento clínico en un seguimiento de 12 semanas. Este
análisis de umbral se llevó a cabo en 4 pasos.
En primer lugar, estimamos los valores de la variable de exposición, el Δ6MWD a nivel de estudio, con un ajuste respecto al placebo,
mediante la realización de regresiones lineales dentro de cada ensayo.
En estas regresiones a nivel de paciente, específicas para cada ensayo, la variable de exposición fue el tratamiento (fármaco y dosis), que
se introdujo en forma de variables indicadoras (con el placebo como
referencia). La variable de resultado fue el Δ6MWD, y nuevamente
se utilizó un ajuste respecto a la 6WMD basal.
En segundo lugar, estimamos los valores del resultado, la logodds a nivel de estudio, con un ajuste para el placebo, de sufrir
un evento clínico entre la situación basal y el seguimiento de 12
semanas, utilizando análisis de regresión logística dentro de cada
ensayo. En estas regresiones a nivel de paciente y específicas para
cada ensayo, el tratamiento (fármaco y dosis, entraron en forma
de variables indicadoras, con el placebo como referencia) fue la
exposición, el evento clínico (sí o no) fue el resultado, y se introdujo un ajuste respecto a la 6MWD basal. Se utilizó una regresión
logística exacta cuando el número de eventos clínicos de un estudio era bajo.
En tercer lugar, utilizamos las 21 combinaciones de fármaco/
dosis en comparación con placebo de todos los ensayos en una metarregresión de efectos fijos que relacionaba la diferencia estimada
de Δ6MWD con el valor estimado de log odds ratio (OR) para los
eventos clínicos. Se utilizó el cuadrado del inverso del error estándar
como factor de ponderación para tener en cuenta la incertidumbre en
la estimación del log OR. Determinamos el efecto umbral mediante
el cálculo de las franjas de predicción del 95% alrededor de la línea
de metarregresión. El umbral se calculó determinando el valor de la
diferencia de Δ6MWD en el lugar en el que la franja de predicción
superior cortaba el valor nulo de 1,0 para la probabilidad relativa de
un evento clínico. Las franjas de predicción cuantifican la incertidumbre existente en la predicción de la diferencia de agravamiento
clínico en un solo ensayo dada una diferencia definida del Δ6MWD.
La linealidad del modelo de regresión final se evaluó con un método
de diagnóstico de regresión estándar.
Por último, intentamos determinar si las características de los pacientes a nivel de estudio introducían una confusión en la asociación
entre el Δ6MWD y las probabilidades relativas de eventos clínicos.
Los posibles factores de confusión se decidieron a priori en función
de las diferencias conocidas de la respuesta al tratamiento según la
raza y el sexo31 y según el diagnóstico y la clasificación funcional
de la NYHA32. En consecuencia, las covariables de nuestro modelo de
regresión fueron las siguientes: raza (porcentaje de raza negra), sexo
(porcentaje de mujeres), categoría diagnóstica de la HAP (porcentaje
de casos asociados al tejido conjuntivo) y clasificación funcional de
la NYHA (porcentaje de clase III o IV). Si un posible factor de confusión modificaba el coeficiente de la variable de tratamiento en ≥ 10%,
se mantenía en el modelo final.
Tabla 1. Características de los participantes en el estudio
Característica
Tratamiento activo
(n 1.563)
Edad, años
50 (38 – 61)
Varones, n (%)
335 (21)
Raza, n (%)
Blancos
1.244 (80)
Negros
86 (6)
Otros
221 (14)
Altura, cm
163 (157–169)
Peso, kg
69,4 (59,0–82,1)
IMC, kg/m2
25,5 (22,5–30,0)
Diagnóstico de HAP, n (%)
Idiopática
946 (62)
Enfermedad del tejido conjuntivo
388 (25)
Infección por VIH/uso de anorexígenos 41 (3)
Cardiopatía congénita
155 (10)
Clasificación funcional de la NYHA, n (%)
I/II
628 (41)
III/IV
917 (59)
Hemodinámica basal
Presión auricular derecha
8,0 (5,0–12,0)
media, mmHg
Placebo
(n 841)
49 (37– 60)
192 (23)
678 (81)
39 (5)
118 (14)
163 (157–170)
70,1 (60,6–83,9)
26,1 (22,9–30,4)
508 (62)
193 (24)
18 (2)
97 (12)
389 (47)
432 (53)
8,0 (5,0–12,0)
Presión arterial pulmonar
media, mmHg
52,0 (43,0–62,0)
54,0 (45,0–64,5)
Gasto cardiaco, L/min
Índice cardiaco, L/min/m2
4,0 (3,2–5,1)
3,9 (3,2–4,9)
2,4 (1,9–3,1)
9,0 (6,0–12,0)
2,3 (1,9–3,1)
9,0 (6,0–12,0)
10,9 (7,1–16,8)
11,2 (7,5–16,0)
14,7 (13,4–16,0)
140 (138–142)
860 (59)
356 (287–408)
14,6 (13,3–16,0)
140 (138–142)
470 (64)
352 (276–410)
134 (9)
127 (8)
145 (9)
101 (6)
204 (13)
118 (8)
123 (8)
64 (4)
314 (20)
233 (15)
67 (8)
65 (8)
69 (8)
101 (12)
65 (8)
60 (7)
62 (7)
34 (4)
81 (10)
237 (28)
Presión capilar pulmonar
enclavada, mmHg
Resistencia vascular pulmonar,
unidades Wood
Valores analíticos basales
Hemoglobina, g/dL
Sodio, mEq/L
Uso de warfarina, n (%)
6MWD basal, m
Estudio, n (%)
ARIES-1
ARIES-2
BREATHE-1
AIR
SUPER
STRIDE-1
STRIDE-2
STRIDE-4
PHIRST
Treprostinilo
IMC indica índice de masa corporal; HAP, hipertensión arterial pulmonar; VIH, virus de la inmunodeficiencia humana; NYHA, New York Heart Association; 6MWD,
distancia recorrida en 6 minutos; ARIES, Ambrisentan in Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension, Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled, Multicenter, Efficacy
Studies; AIR, Aerosolized Iloprost Randomized; BREATHE, Bosentan: Randomized
Trial of Endothelin receptor Antagonist Therapy; STRIDE, Sitaxsentan To Relieve
Impaired Exercise; SUPER, Sildenafil Use in Pulmonary Hypertension; y PHIRST,
Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension and Response to Tadalafil.
Los resúmenes estadísticos se presentan en forma de mediana (cuartil 1-cuartil 3)
a menos que se indique lo contrario con n (%).
Gabler y cols. Validación de la distancia recorrida en 6 minutos 7
Tabla 2. Características de los estudios y las combinaciones de fármacos
Estadísticas a nivel
de estudio
Estudio y fármaco/dosis
n
ARIES-1
Ambrisentán 5 mg
67
Ambrisentán 10 mg
67
Placebo
67
ARIES-2
Ambrisentán 2,5 mg
64
Ambrisentán 5 mg
63
Placebo
65
BREATHE-1
Bosentán 125 mg
75
Bosentán 250 mg
70
Placebo
69
AIR
Iloprost
101
Placebo
101
STRIDE-1
Sitaxentán 100 mg
55
Sitaxentán 300 mg
63
Placebo
60
STRIDE-2
Sitaxentán 50 mg
61
Sitaxentán 100 mg
62
Placebo
62
STRIDE-4
Sitaxentán 50 mg
32
Sitaxentán 100 mg
32
Placebo
34
SUPER
Sildenafilo 20 mg
68
Sildenafilo 40 mg
65
Sildenafilo 80 mg
71
Placebo
65
PHIRST
Tadalafilo 2,5 mg
79
Tadalafilo 10 mg
79
Tadalafilo 20 mg
81
Tadalafilo 40 mg
75
Placebo
81
Treprostinilo
Treprostinilo
233
Placebo
237
Eventos clínicos, n
% Mujeres
% Negros
% NYHA III/IV
% ETC
10
84
7,3
65
31
20
74
0
54
32
9
79
7,1
100
22
41
67
1,5
100
23
7
79
8,1
67
24
8
77
13,1
63
29
2
84
6,7
39
15
17
76
2,6
61
30
39
78
9,7
67
24
45
81
5,3
7
19
NYHA indica New York Heart Association ETC, enfermedad del tejido conjuntivo; ARIES, Ambrisentan in Pulmonary
Arterial Hypertension, Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled, Multicenter, Efficacy Studies; BREATHE, Bosentan: Randomized Trial of Endothelin receptor Antagonist Therapy; AIR, Aerosolized Iloprost Randomized; STRIDE, Sitaxsentan To Relieve Impaired Exercise; SUPER, Sildenafil Use in Pulmonary Hypertension; y PHIRST, Pulmonary Arterial
Hypertension and Response to Tadalafil.
Llevamos a cabo 2 análisis secundarios. En primer lugar, excluimos el estudio PHIRST (Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension and Response to Tadalafil), en el que se permitió que los pacientes utilizaran
un tratamiento de base con otros fármacos específicos para la HAP
aprobados. En segundo lugar, excluimos a los pacientes que estaban
en la clase IV de la NYHA en el momento de la aleatorización, ya
que es improbable que estos pacientes sean incluidos en futuros ensayos clínicos. Todas las regresiones y metarregresiones se realizaron
8 Circulation Enero, 2013
Tabla 3. Criterios para establecer que el cambio de la 6MWD interviene en la relación entre la asignación del tratamiento y la aparición de
un evento clínico en un seguimiento de 12 semanas
Criterios
Resultados*
La asignación del tratamiento tiene un efecto significativo en el Δ6MWD respecto al valor basal
a las 12 semanas de seguimiento
El Δ6MWD tiene un efecto significativo en la probabilidad de presentar un evento clínico
Diferencia media, 22,4 (IC del 95%, 15,9 –28,9)
La asignación del tratamiento tiene un efecto significativo sobre la probabilidad de presentar un
evento clínico a las 12 semanas de seguimiento
El efecto de la asignación del tratamiento sobre la probabilidad de presentar un evento clínico
(en comparación con lo indicado antes) es atenuado con la adición del Δ6MWD al modelo
OR, 0,43 (IC del 95% 0,31-0,59)
OR, 0,89 por 10 m (IC del 95%, 0,87–0,91)
OR, 0,52 (IC del 95% 0,37-0,73)
6MWD indica distancia recorrida en 6 minutos; IC, intervalo de confianza; y OR, odds ratio.
*Todos los modelos incluyen un ajuste respecto al estudio y a la distancia recorrida en la situación basal; la asignación al grupo placebo constituye el grupo de referencia para todos los modelos que incluían el tratamiento.
con el programa R versión 2.13 (R Development Core Team, Viena,
Austria).
El comité ético de la University of Pennsylvania determinó que
este estudio estaba eximido de la exigencia de autorización (aprobación número 814001). Todos los coautores tuvieron acceso a los
datos del estudio, asumen la responsabilidad del análisis, y tuvieron
autoridad en la elaboración del manuscrito y la decisión de presentarlo para publicación.
Resultados
Los 10 ensayos incluían un total de 2.404 pacientes; a 1.563
(65%) se les asignó el tratamiento activo. La mediana de edad
de los participantes era de 50 años (rango, 10–90 años), un
22% eran varones, y un 5% eran de raza negra (Tabla 1). En
581 pacientes (24%) el diagnóstico era de HAP causada por
una enfermedad del tejido conjuntivo, y 1.349 (56%) fueron
clasificados en clase III o IV de la NYHA. Fallecieron 45 pacientes (2%) entre la situación basal y el seguimiento realizado a las 12 semanas. Otros 153 pacientes (6%) presentaron
otros eventos clínicos; en 83 de ellos no se dispuso de datos de
distancia recorrida a las 12 semanas. La media de la distancia
recorrida en la situación basal fue de 341 m (DE, 85,7 m).
Los valores demográficos, antropométricos, analíticos y hemodinámicos fueron similares en los distintos grupos definidos según la asignación del tratamiento.
Las características de los 10 ensayos se indican en la Tabla 2. Los porcentajes a nivel de estudio de mujeres y de pacientes con diagnóstico de HAP relacionada con enfermedad del tejido conjuntivo fueron uniformes en los diversos estudios. Los
porcentajes de clase III/IV de la NYHA y de pacientes de raza
negra mostraron una mayor variación en los diversos estudios.
¿Interviene la 6MWD en la relación entre la asignación del tratamiento y los eventos clínicos?
Los 4 criterios necesarios para establecer que el Δ6MWD es
un mediador en la relación entre la asignación del tratamiento
y la aparición de un evento clínico se indican en la Tabla 3.
Para cada uno de ellos, observamos un resultado estadísticamente significativo en el sentido requerido. En primer lugar
la asignación al tratamiento activo en comparación con la
asignación a placebo dio lugar a diferencias mayores en el
Δ6MWD (diferencia media del Δ6MWD, 22,4 m; IC del 95%,
15,9–28,9 m). En segundo lugar, las diferencias mayores del
Δ6MWD reducían significativamente las probabilidades de
eventos clínicos en el seguimiento realizado a las 12 semanas
(OR para un aumento de 10 m en el Δ6MWD, 0,89; IC del
95%, 0,87–0,91). En tercer lugar, la asignación al tratamiento
activo en comparación con la asignación a placebo redujo significativamente la probabilidad relativa de eventos clínicos a
las 12 semanas (OR, 0,43; IC del 95%, 0,31–0,59). Por último,
el efecto de la asignación del tratamiento sobre la aparición de
un evento clínico se atenuaba con la adición del Δ6MWD al
modelo (OR, 0,52; IC del 95%, 0,37–0,73). La parte del efecto
del tratamiento sobre las probabilidades de sufrir un evento
clínico a las 12 semanas que se explicaba por el Δ6MWD fue
del 22,1% (IC del 95%, 12,1–31,1%). Además, la prueba de
Sobel modificada confirmó la significación estadística de la
mediación (Z = 4,77, p < 0,001). No hubo interacciones significativas entre el tratamiento y el Δ6MWD (estimación [IC del
95%], 0,002 [-0,002 a 0,006], p = 0,25).
¿Existe un efecto umbral para el Δ6MWD?
En comparación con placebo, casi todas las combinaciones de
fármaco/dosis produjeron un valor superior del Δ6MWD en el
seguimiento realizado a las 12 semanas (Tabla 4). El resumen
de los resultados indica una diferencia media del Δ6MWD de
22,4 m (IC del 95%, 17,4 –27,5 m) con la asignación al tratamiento activo en comparación con placebo. El efecto sobre
la reducción de los eventos clínicos fue uniforme con las diversas combinaciones de fármaco/dosis. En comparación con
placebo, las 21 combinaciones de fármaco/dosis redujeron las
probabilidades de aparición de un evento clínico en el seguimiento de 12 semanas (OR de resumen, 0,44; IC del 95%,
0,33–0,57).
En la Figura se muestran los resultados de nuestra metarregresión y análisis de umbral. El intervalo superior de la predicción cortaba el valor nulo para la probabilidad relativa de
un evento clínico con una diferencia de Δ6MWD de 41,8 m.
Este valor indica la diferencia mínima del Δ6MWD que corresponde a una reducción estadísticamente significativa de
los eventos clínicos. Los modelos que incluían los factores
de raza, sexo, categoría diagnóstica y clase funcional de la
NYHA no mostraron indicio alguno de un efecto de confusión
y estas variables no se incluyeron en el modelo de metarregresión final.
En un análisis de sensibilidad, excluimos las 4 combinaciones de fármaco/dosis del estudio PHIRST, ya que este estudio
fue el único en el que se permitió el uso de un tratamiento de
base concomitante. La exclusión de este estudio hizo que el
Gabler y cols. Validación de la distancia recorrida en 6 minutos 9
Tabla 4. Resultados específicos para fármaco/dosis ajustados según el efecto placebo
Estudio y fármaco/dosis
Diferencia de Δ6MWD,
m (IC del 95%)
OR para los eventos
clínicos (IC del 95%)
Ponderación en
la metarregresión
ARIES-1
Ambrisentán 5 mg
24,9 (0,32–49,4)
0,58 (0,13–2,53)
1,8
Ambrisentán 10 mg
41,4 (15,6–67,2)
0,38 (0,07–2,04)
1,4
Ambrisentán 2,5 mg
37,3 (8,2–66,3)
0,35 (0,11–1,12)
2,8
Ambrisentán 5 mg
53,6 (24,4–82,8)
0,22 (0,06–0,88)
2,1
Bosentán 125 mg
33,4 (8,6–58,3)
0,58 (0,12–2,80)
1,5
Bosentán 250 mg
46,3 (21,1–71,6)
0,42 (0,07–2,47)
1,2
24,5 ( 2,4–51,3)
0,47 (0,23–0,96)
7,3
Sitaxentán 100 mg
33,3 (9,1–57,4)
0,20 (0,02–1,99)
0,7
Sitaxentán 300 mg
24,6 ( 0,45–49,7)
0,36 (0,06–2,15)
1,2
7,1 ( 27,6–13,5)
0,54 (0,09–3,20)
1,2
0,77 (0,13–4,72)
1,2
ARIES-2
BREATHE-1
AIR
Iloprost
STRIDE-1
STRIDE-2
Sitaxentán 50 mg
Sitaxentán 100 mg
15,2 ( 4,7–35,1)
STRIDE-4
Sitaxentán 50 mg
19,1 ( 49,9–11,8)
0,71 (0–4,42)*
0,1
Sitaxentán 100 mg
6,9 ( 23,5–37,5)
0,73 (0–2,07)*
0,1
SUPER
Sildenafilo 20 mg
39,3 (15,0–63,6)
0,36 (0,09–1,47)
1,9
Sildenafilo 40 mg
45,2 (20,6–69,8)
0,25 (0,05–1,28)
1,5
Sildenafilo 80 mg
42,1 (18,0–66,3)
0,59 (0,17–1,98)
2,6
PHIRST
Tadalafilo 2,5 mg
0,49 (0,18–1,34)
3,8
Tadalafilo 10 mg
17,1 ( 4,3–38,5)
0,3 ( 20,7–20,0)
0,30 (0,10–0,90)
3,1
Tadalafilo 20 mg
24,6 (5,1–44,1)
0,59 (0,23–1,51)
4,4
Tadalafilo 40 mg
18,2 ( 2,2–38,6)
0,27 (0,08–0,90)
2,7
9,9 ( 6,7–26,4)
0,52 (0,27–0,99)
9,2
Treprostinilo
Treprostinilo
Resumen†
22,4 (17,4–27,5)
0,44 (0,33–0,57)
6MWD indica distancia recorrida en 6 minutos; IC, intervalo de confianza; OR, odds ratio; ARIES, Ambrisentan in Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension, Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled, Multicenter, Efficacy Studies; BREATHE,
Bosentan: Randomized Trial of Endothelin receptor Antagonist Therapy; AIR, Aerosolized Iloprost Randomized; STRIDE,
Sitaxsentan To Relieve Impaired Exercise; SUPER, Sildenafil Use in Pulmonary Hypertension; y PHIRST, Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension and Response to Tadalafil.
El grupo de referencia es el grupo placebo en cada estudio. Todos los análisis incluyen un ajuste respecto a la distancia recorrida en la situación basal.
*Obtenido mediante regresión logística exacta.
†Obtenido mediante metanálisis de efectos fijos (p para la heterogeneidad = 0,99).
valor umbral fuera más bajo, de 25,7 m, para la diferencia
del Δ6MWD. En otro análisis adicional, la exclusión de los
pacientes que estaban en la clase IV de la NYHA (n = 127)
no modificó los resultados de manera apreciable. Se presenta
una información adicional al respecto en el Suplemento de
Datos Online.
Discusión
Este estudio presenta el primer examen riguroso de la validez
del Δ6WMD a las 12 semanas respecto al valor basal como
variable de valoración sustitutiva en los ensayos terapéuticos
de la HAP. El Δ6MWD cumplió todos los criterios de mediador de la relación entre el tratamiento y la aparición de un
evento clínico en el seguimiento de 12 semanas; sin embargo,
la parte de esta relación explicada por la 6MWD era modesta,
de un 22%, lo cual sugiere que la 6MWD puede no ser una
variable sustitutiva suficiente. Se identificó también un efecto
umbral de 41,8 m, lo cual significa que si un fármaco mejora
la 6MWD a lo largo de 12 semanas en 41,8 m más de lo que
lo hace el placebo, los investigadores podrían predecir, con un
nivel de confianza del 95%, que el fármaco reduciría la tasa de
eventos clínicos a lo largo de 12 semanas.
10 Circulation Enero, 2013
Figura. Resultados del análisis de metarregresión que muestra la
relación entre los cambios de la distancia recorrida en 6 minutos
(6MWD) a las 12 semanas de seguimiento respecto a la situación
basal a nivel de fármaco/dosis según el estudio con la probabilidad
de un evento clínico a las 12 semanas. Cada círculo corresponde
a una combinación de fármaco/dosis, y los tamaños son proporcionales a la ponderación del estudio (tal como se detalla en la
Tabla 4 y en función de una ponderación inversa de la varianza).
El área gris sombreada corresponde a los límites de los intervalos de
predicción del 95%. El valor umbral se indica en el eje horizontal
en 41,8 m.
Observamos que tan solo 4 de las 21 combinaciones de
fármaco-dosis producían efectos sobre el Δ6MWD que pudiera afirmarse, con un grado de certeza convencional, que
se asociaban a una mejoría clínica (Figura). Si se utiliza el
valor de umbral inferior de 25,7 m, 5 de las 17 combinaciones de fármaco-dosis restantes producirían efectos estadísticamente significativos sobre los resultados clínicos en ausencia de un tratamiento de base. De estas 9 combinaciones
de fármaco-dosis que cumplían el criterio del valor umbral
inferior, 1 correspondía a un fármaco que no ha sido autorizado por la FDA (sitaxentán) y 2 a dosis que no se incluyen
en el prospecto de la FDA (sildenafilo 40 mg 3 veces al día
y sildenafilo 80 mg 3 veces al día). Tres fármacos (iloprost,
tadalafilo y treprostinilo) no cumplían ninguno de los dos
criterios de valor umbral.
Es esencial explorar la validez de las variables de valoración sustitutivas, ya que las que son válidas proporcionan
un mecanismo eficiente para la realización de los estudios
de nuevas intervenciones en las fases iniciales. Concretamente, los ensayos que utilizan variables de valoración
sustitutivas validadas pueden llevarse a cabo con mayor rapidez, con tamaños muestrales menores, con menos riesgos
para los participantes y con un menor coste de investigación, en comparación con los ensayos que utilizan las variables de valoración clínicas reales33,34. Sin embargo, estas
ventajas solamente se dan de forma clara si las variables de
valoración sustitutivas han sido validadas; en ausencia
de validación, existe un considerable riesgo, tal como
hizo famoso el Cardiac Arrhythmia Suppression Trial
(CAST)35, de que se llegue erróneamente a una conclusión
de efectividad de una nueva intervención.
Estos datos añaden también nueva información a la cada
vez más amplia literatura existente sobre el uso de la 6MWD
como variable de valoración en otros contextos. Con el empleo de diferentes métodos, se ha evaluado la 6MWD en la
fibrosis pulmonar idiopática36, la enfermedad pulmonar obstructiva crónica37 y la rehabilitación cardiaca38. En el presente estudio, observamos que la parte del efecto de tratamiento
en la prevención de los eventos clínicos que se explicaba
por el cambio de la 6MWD era de un 22,1%, lo cual está por
debajo del umbral del 50% a 75% descrito para una variable sustitutiva válida por Freedman y cols.27 aunque algunos
autores consideran que este criterio es demasiado estricto15.
Parece claro que los tratamientos de la HAP ejercen unos
efectos sobre el resultado no medidos que no son explicados
plenamente por el cambio de la 6MWD39. Así pues, la observación de una mediación real aunque modesta por parte
de la 6MWD sugiere que puede no ser suficiente utilizarla
sola. La incorporación en una medida sustitutiva combinada,
junto con evaluaciones hemodinámicas o de otro tipo podría
mejorar su rendimiento y justificar la realización de nuevos
estudios.
El valor umbral de 41,8 m que identificamos para la diferencia del Δ6MWD puede tenerse en cuenta para un uso
como nivel de mejora del Δ6MWD que es necesario para poder concluir de manera fiable que la intervención aportará un
beneficio clínico en futuros ensayos. Con el empleo de diferentes métodos y pacientes de un único estudio (el estudio
SUPER [Sildenafil Use in Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension),
Gilbert y cols.40 estimaron una diferencia mínima clínicamente importante de 41 m, que estaba correlacionada con la mejoría descrita por el paciente. De igual modo, en pacientes con
HAP no tratados, Paciocco y cols.41 observaron que cada 50
m de aumento en la distancia recorrida se asociaban a una
reducción de la mortalidad del 18%. La coincidencia de los
resultados en los diversos estudios realizados con el empleo
de métodos diferentes respalda la solidez de este resultado.
Sin embargo, el Δ6MWD continúa siendo una variable de
valoración sustitutiva insuficiente, dado el grado modesto
de mediación en el efecto del tratamiento.
La fiabilidad de los resultados del presente estudio deriva
del gran tamaño muestral utilizado y del hecho de que los
efectos del tratamiento sobre los cambios de la 6MWD y sobre los eventos clínicos fueron uniformes con todas las dosis
de medicación42. No obstante, el presente estudio tiene ciertas limitaciones. En primer lugar, como ocurre en cualquier
metanálisis, los resultados están sujetos a posibles errores
en la realización, entrada de datos o análisis de los datos
principales. En segundo lugar, estos ensayos principales incluyeron principalmente a mujeres y a individuos blancos, y
utilizaron unos periodos de seguimiento relativamente breves. No pudimos evaluar los resultados clínicos posteriores a
las 12 semanas, y nuestros resultados no deben generalizarse
a un periodo superior a este. Sin embargo, las características
demográficas representadas concuerdan con la epidemiología más amplia de la HAP, y todos los ensayos incluidos
tenían unas características similares en cuanto a seguimiento, definiciones de los eventos clínicos y evaluación de los
resultados, lo cual hace que sean apropiados para un planteamiento metanalítico.
Todos los ensayos que hemos examinado utilizaron un
diseño controlado con placebo, lo cual constituye un punto
Gabler y cols. Validación de la distancia recorrida en 6 minutos 11
fuerte adicional; sin embargo, 1 estudio permitió el uso de
un tratamiento de base concomitante. La exclusión del ensayo
PHIRST redujo nuestro valor umbral, lo cual sugiere que en
futuros ensayos en los que se empleen tratamientos de base
puede ser preciso utilizar valores umbrales superiores a los indicados aquí. En otras palabras, en presencia de un tratamiento efectivo para la HAP, un ensayo controlado y aleatorizado
de un nuevo tratamiento puede requerir la obtención de mayores diferencias del Δ6MWD para indicar de manera fiable
que los resultados corresponden a diferencias en la evolución
clínica. No pudimos explorar con mayor profundidad el papel
del tratamiento de base debido al pequeño tamaño muestral.
Así pues, serán necesarias nuevas investigaciones teniendo
en cuenta las cuestiones éticas que se plantean en relación
con la futura realización de ensayos controlados con placebo
en la HAP43.
Por último, utilizamos técnicas estadísticas para poder
abordar mejor una cuestión clínica. Aunque nuestra estimación del umbral proporciona una idea clara del grado
de Δ6MWD que sería necesario para indicar que los efectos beneficiosos de un tratamiento serán superiores a cero,
la inferencia de una diferencia “clínicamente importante”
en los resultados podría justificar el empleo de un umbral
diferente. Los pacientes individuales pueden mostrar una
mejoría clínica sin alcanzar un determinado valor umbral
del Δ6MWD, y hay pacientes que mejoran su 6MWD sin
presentar necesariamente una mejoría clínica. Sin embargo, los valores umbral a nivel de población que hemos
establecido serán útiles para el diseño de futuros ensayos
clínicos.
En conclusión, hemos utilizado 2 enfoques complementarios para examinar la validez del Δ6MWD como
variable de valoración sustitutiva en ensayos clínicos de
tratamientos para la HAP. Pudimos identificar un efecto
umbral significativo del Δ6MWD que puede usarse como
guía para futuros ensayos controlados y aleatorizados, y
observamos que el Δ6MWD es un mediador en la relación
entre el tratamiento y los resultados clínicos. Sin embargo, dado que el Δ6MWD no explica una gran parte de este
efecto del tratamiento, puede no ser suficiente para poder
usarlo como variable de valoración sustitutiva por sí sola.
Serán necesarios nuevos estudios para identificar variables
de valoración sustitutivas combinadas que puedan tener
unas características mejores y para determinar si este valor
umbral que identificamos es aplicable a los ensayos que
utilizan un tratamiento de base o que no emplean ningún
control de placebo.
Agradecimientos
Agradecemos a Maximilian Herlim y a Ziyue Liu, PhD, su inestimable ayuda en la preparación de los datos para el análisis y a los Drs.
Norman Stockbridge y Salma Lemtouni de la FDA que nos proporcionaran los datos para la realización de este estudio.
Fuentes de financiación
Este trabajo fue financiado por una subvención de la American Thoracic Society/Pfizer para investigación en hipertensión pulmonar (Dr.
Halpern). El Dr. Kawut recibió la subvención K24 HL103844. Ni
la FDA ni las fuentes de financiación intervinieron en modo alguno
en el diseño de este estudio ni en la decisión de presentarlo para pu-
blicación. La FDA revisó el estudio antes de la presentación, según
la condición establecida en el contrato original, pero no solicitó la
introducción de cambio alguno en nuestro texto.
Declaraciones de intereses
El Dr. Gabler ha participado en proyectos no relacionados financiados por Pfizer, Inc. El Dr. Strom ha sido consultor de Abbott, Amgen, Astra Zeneca, BMS, Boehringer Ingelheim, GlaxoSmithKline,
Novartis, NPS Pharma, Nuvo Research, Orexigen, Pfizer, Teva y
Vivus, y ha recibido financiación para investigación de AstraZeneca, BMS, Pfizer, Shire y Takeda. Ha recibido pagos por la contribución al programa de formación en farmacoepidemiología de
Penn, por parte de Abbott, Amgen, Hoffman LaRoche, Novartis,
Pfizer, Sanofi Pasteur y Wyeth. El Dr. Palevsky ha recibido pagos
por consultoría, por pertenencia a consejos asesores, por conferencias y/o financiación para investigación de Actelion, Bayer, GeNO,
Gilead, GlaxoSmithKline, Pfizer, United Therapeutics y Lung Rx.
Estas labores no han influido en modo alguno en este análisis de los
resultados de estudios publicados con anterioridad. El Dr. Kawut
ha recibido pagos por consultoría, pertenencia a consejos asesores
y conferencias, subvenciones de formación no condicionadas y/o
financiación para investigación de Pfizer, Actelion, Bayer, Ikaria,
Novartis, Merck, Gilead, United Therapeutics y Lung Rx. El Dr.
Taichman ha recibido financiación para investigación del centro por
parte de Actelion. Los demás autores no declaran ningún conflicto
de intereses.
Bibliografía
1. Taichman DB, Mandel J. Epidemiology of pulmonary arterial hypertension. Clin Chest Med. 2007;28:1–22.
2. Humbert M, Sitbon O, Chaouat A, Bertocchi M, Habib G, Gressin V, Yaici
A, Weitzenblum E, Cordier JF, Chabot F, Dromer C, Pison C, ReynaudGaubert M, Haloun A, Laurent M, Hachulla E, Cottin V, Degano B, Jais X,
Montani D, Souza R, Simonneau G. Survival in patients with idiopathic,
familial, and anorexigen-associated pulmonary arterial hypertension in the
modern management era. Circulation. 2010;122:156 –163.
3. Provencher S, Sitbon O, Humbert M, Cabrol S, Jais X, Simonneau G.
Long-term outcome with first-line bosentan therapy in idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension. Eur Heart J. 2006;27:589 –595.
4. Sitbon O, Humbert M, Nunes H, Parent F, Garcia G, Herve P, Rainisio M,
Simonneau G. Long-term intravenous epoprostenol infusion in primary
pulmonary hypertension: prognostic factors and survival. J Am Coll
Cardiol. 2002;40:780 –788.
5. Miyamoto S, Nagaya N, Satoh T, Kyotani S, Sakamaki F, Fujita M,
Nakanishi N, Miyatake K. Clinical correlates and prognostic significance
of six-minute walk test in patients with primary pulmonary hypertension:
comparison with cardiopulmonary exercise testing. Am J Respir Crit Care
Med. 2000;161:487– 492.
6. Baker SG, Kramer BS. A perfect correlate does not a surrogate make.
BMC Med Res Methodol. 2003;3:16.
7. Prentice RL. Surrogate endpoints in clinical trials: definition and operational criteria. Stat Med. 1989;8:431– 440.
8. Ventetuolo CE, Benza RL, Peacock AJ, Zamanian RT, Badesch DB,
Kawut SM. Surrogate and combined end points in pulmonary arterial
hypertension. Proc Am Thorac Soc. 2008;5:617– 622.
9. Snow JL, Kawut SM. Surrogate end points in pulmonary arterial hypertension: assessing the response to therapy. Clin Chest Med. 2007;28:75–89.
10. Macchia A, Marchioli R, Marfisi R, Scarano M, Levantesi G, Tavazzi L,
Tognoni G. A meta-analysis of trials of pulmonary hypertension: a
clinical condition looking for drugs and research methodology. Am
Heart J. 2007;153:1037–1047.
11. Helman DL, Brown AW, Jackson JL, Shorr AF. Analyzing the short-term
effect of placebo therapy in pulmonary arterial hypertension: potential implications for the design of future clinical trials. Chest. 2007;132:764–777.
12. Galie N, Manes A, Negro L, Palazzini M, Bacchi-Reggiani ML, Branzi
A. A meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials in pulmonary arterial
hypertension. Eur Heart J. 2009;30:394 – 403.
12 Circulation Enero, 2013
13. Macchia A, Marchioli R, Tognoni G, Scarano M, Marfisi R, Tavazzi L,
Rich S. Systematic review of trials using vasodilators in pulmonary
arterial hypertension: why a new approach is needed. Am Heart J. 2010;
159:245–257.
14. Johnson KR, Freemantle N, Anthony DM, Lassere MND. LDL-cholesterol differences predicted survival benefit in statin trials by the surrogate
threshold effect (STE). J Clin Epidemiol. 2009;62:328 –336.
15. Buyse M, Molenberghs G. Criteria for the validation of surrogate endpoints in randomized experiments. Biometrics. 1998;54:1014 –1029.
16. MacKinnon DP, Dwyer JH. Estimating mediated effects in prevention
studies. Eval Rev. 1993;17:144 –158.
17. Burzykowski T, Buyse M. Surrogate threshold effect: an alternative
measure for meta-analytic surrogate endpoint validation. Pharm Stat.
2006;5:173–186.
18. Simonneau G, Barst RJ, Galie N, Naeije R, Rich S, Bourge RC, Keogh A,
Oudiz R, Frost A, Blackburn SD, Crow JW, Rubin LJ. Continuous
subcutaneous infusion of treprostinil, a prostacyclin analogue, in patients
with pulmonary arterial hypertension: a double-blind, randomized,
placebo-controlled trial. Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 2002;165:800 – 804.
19. Galie N, Olschewski H, Oudiz RJ, Torres F, Frost A, Ghofrani HA,
Badesch DB, McGoon MD, McLaughlin VV, Roecker EB, Gerber MJ,
Dufton C, Wiens BL, Rubin LJ. Ambrisentan for the treatment of pulmonary arterial hypertension: results of the Ambrisentan in Pulmonary
Arterial Hypertension, Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled,
Multicenter, Efficacy (ARIES) Study 1 and 2. Circulation. 2008;117:
3010 –3019.
20. Rubin LJ, Badesch DB, Barst RJ, Galie N, Black CM, Keogh A, Pulido T,
Frost A, Roux S, Leconte I, Landzberg M, Simonneau G. Bosentan therapy
for pulmonary arterial hypertension. N Engl J Med. 2002;346:896–903.
21. Olschewski H, Simonneau G, Galie N, Higenbottam T, Naeije R, Rubin
LJ, Nikkho S, Speich R, Hoeper MM, Behr J, Winkler J, Sitbon O, Popov
W, Ghofrani HA, Manes A, Kiely DG, Ewert R, Meyer A, Corris PA,
Delcroix M, Gomez-Sanchez M, Siedentop H, Seeger W; the Aerosolized
Iloprost Randomized Study Group. Inhaled iloprost for severe pulmonary
hypertension. N Engl J Med. 2002;347:322–329.
22. Barst RJ, Langleben D, Frost A, Horn EM, Oudiz R, Shapiro S,
McLaughlin V, Hill N, Tapson VF, Robbins IM, Zwicke D, Duncan B,
Dixon RAF, Frumkin LR. Sitaxsentan therapy for pulmonary arterial
hypertension. Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 2004;169:441– 447.
23. Barst RJ, Langleben D, Badesch D, Frost A, Lawrence EC, Shapiro S,
Naeije R, Galie N. Treatment of pulmonary arterial hypertension with the
selective endothelin-A receptor antagonist sitaxsentan. J Am Coll
Cardiol. 2006;47:2049 –2056.
24. Galie N, Ghofrani HA, Torbicki A, Barst RJ, Rubin LJ, Badesch D,
Fleming T, Parpia T, Burgess G, Branzi A, Grimminger F, Kurzyna M,
Simonneau G; Sildenafil Use in Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension Study
Group. Sildenafil citrate therapy for pulmonary arterial hypertension.
N Engl J Med. 2005;353:2148 –2157.
25. Galie N, Brundage BH, Ghofrani HA, Oudiz RJ, Simonneau G, Safdar Z,
Shapiro S, White RJ, Chan M, Beardsworth A, Frumkin L, Barst RJ.
Tadalafil therapy for pulmonary arterial hypertension. Circulation. 2009;
119:2894 –2903.
26. Klebanoff MA, Cole SR. Use of multiple imputation in the epidemiologic
literature. Am J Epidemiol. 2008;168:355–357.
27. Freedman LS, Graubard BI, Schatzkin A. Statistical validation of intermediate end-points for chronic diseases. Stat Med. 1992;11:167–178.
28. Huang J, Huang B. Evaluating the proportion of treatment effect
explained by a continuous surrogate marker in logistic or probit
regression models. Stat Biopharm Res. 2010;2:229 –238.
29. Efron B, Tibshirani RJ. An Introduction to the Bootstrap. New York, NY:
Chapman and Hall; 1993.
30. Jasti S, Dudley WN, Goldwater E. SAS macros for testing statistical
mediation in data with binary mediators or outcomes. Nurs Res. 2008;
57:118 –122.
31. Gabler NB, French B, Strom BL, Liu Z, Palevsky HI, Taichman DB,
Kawut SM, Halpern SD. Race and sex differences in response to endothelin receptor antagonists for pulmonary arterial hypertension. Chest.
2012;141:20 –26.
32. Kuhn KP, Byrne DW, Arbogast PG, Doyle TP, Loyd JE, Robbins IM.
Outcome in 91 consecutive patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension
receiving epoprostenol. Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 2003;167:580 –586.
33. Lassere MN. The biomarker-surrogacy evaluation schema: a review of
the biomarker-surrogate literature and a proposal for a criterion-based,
quantitative, multidimensional hierarchical levels of evidence schema for
evaluating the status of biomarkers as surrogate endpoints. Stat Methods
Med Res. 2008;17:303–340.
34. Rasekaba T, Lee AL, Naughton MT, Williams TJ, Holland AE. The
six-minute walk test: a useful metric for the cardiopulmonary patient.
Intern Med J. 2009;39:495–501.
35. Echt DS, Liebson PR, Mitchell LB, Peters RW, Obias-Manno D, Barker
AH, Arensberg D, Baker A, Friedman L, Greene HL, Huther ML, Richardson DW; CAST Investigators. Mortality and morbidity in patients
receiving encainide, flecainide, or placebo: the Cardiac Arrhythmia Suppression Trial. N Engl J Med. 1991;324:781–788.
36. du Bois RM, Weycker D, Albera C, Bradford WZ, Costabel U, Kartashov
A, Lancaster L, Noble PW, Sahn SA, Szwarcberg J, Thomeer M, Valeyre
D, King TE Jr. Six-minute-walk test in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis: test
validation and minimal clinically important difference. Am J Respir Crit
Care Med. 2011;183:1231–1237.
37. Redelmeier DA, Bayoumi AM, Goldstein RS, Guyatt GH. Interpreting
small differences in functional status: the six minute walk test in chronic
lung disease patients. Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 1997;155:1278 –1282.
38. Hamilton DM, Haennel RG. Validity and reliability of the 6-minute walk
test in a cardiac rehabilitation population. J Cardiopulm Rehabil. 2000;
20:156 –164.
39. Fleming TR, DeMets DL. Surrogate end points in clinical trials: are we
being misled? Ann Intern Med. 1996;125:605– 613.
40. Gilbert C, Brown MC, Cappelleri JC, Carlsson M, McKenna SP. Estimating a minimally important difference in pulmonary arterial hypertension following treatment with sildenafil. Chest. 2009;135:137–142.
41. Paciocco G, Martinez FJ, Bossone E, Pielsticker E, Gillespie B, Rubenfire
M. Oxygen desaturation on the six-minute walk test and mortality in
untreated primary pulmonary hypertension. Eur Respir J. 2001;17:
647– 652.
42. Buyse M, Molenberghs G, Burzykowski T, Renard D, Geys H. The
validation of surrogate endpoints in meta-analyses of randomized experiments. Biostatistics. 2000;1:49 – 67.
43. Halpern SD, Doyle R, Kawut SM. The ethics of randomized clinical trials
in pulmonary arterial hypertension. Proc Am Thorac Soc. 2008;5:
631– 635.
PERSPECTIVA CLÍNICA
Este estudio pone de manifiesto que el cambio de la distancia recorrida en 6 minutos (6MWD) satisface los criterios estadísticos de un factor mediador entre el tratamiento farmacológico y los resultados clínicos en los ensayos clínicos aleatorizados.
Se identificaron umbrales del cambio de la 6MWD para los que se considera que si futuros fármacos produjeran tales cambios, podría inferirse que dichos fármacos producirían también efectos clínicos. Es posible que sean necesarios umbrales más
altos de 6MWD al evaluar nuevos fármacos en presencia de un tratamiento de base para la hipertensión arterial pulmonar; sin
embargo, nuestros resultados indican que probablemente la 6MWD no sea adecuada para el uso como variable de valoración
sustitutiva en los ensayos clínicos en la hipertensión arterial pulmonar, ya que tan solo una parte modesta del efecto de los
fármacos sobre los resultados clínicos reales se explica por los cambios de la 6MWD. Serán necesarias nuevas investigaciones
para identificar variables de valoración sustitutivas o combinaciones de ellas que sean más sólidas.