16th North American Higher Education Conference - CONAHEC

rence
fe
n
o
C
n
o
ti
a
c
u
d
E
r
e
h
ig
16th North American H
er 8-10, 2014
na | Octob
zo
ri
A
,
n
o
cs
Tu
|
s
as
P
r
J.W. Marriott Star
Table of Contents
Conference at a Glance...................................................... 4
Conference Info....................................................................7
Sessions – October 8.......................................................... 8
Sessions – October 9......................................................... 11
Sessions – October 10...................................................... 22
Board of Directors............................................................. 26
Información General de Conferencia.............................27
Sesiones - Octubre 8........................................................ 28
Sesiones - Octubre 9......................................................... 31
Sesiones - Octubre 10...................................................... 42
CONAHEC Consejo Directivo.......................................... 47
Welcome to the 16th North American Higher Education Conference, hosted by the University of Arizona. This year the
Consortium for North American Higher Education Collaboration (CONAHEC) celebrates its 20th year of strengthening collaborations among higher education institutions, government, and industry throughout North America and
beyond. This conference will celebrate our achievements and define the path for the next 20. “The Next 20: Pathways,
Partners, Paradigms” will focus on how synergies between higher education institutions, governments and businesses
can be leveraged internationally to address global challenges and promote a healthier, more equitable world.
Global development is driven by higher education, government and business, and collectively these sectors will provide the solutions to the enormous problems that face humanity in the 21st century. Never before has the potential
been greater to stamp out world hunger and poverty, to ensure universal human rights, and to effect positive change
leading to more sustainable societies and relationships between people and the environment. The North American region and the rest of the world must strengthen our collective ability to work together, share knowledge and information, and own and solve the problems our societies face. To address global grand challenges, building interdisciplinary and cross-sector relationships based on integrity and trust becomes paramount. Creating and stewarding these
relationships was one of the founding principles of CONAHEC, and it remains our core activity today.
Commemorating 20 years of advancement, this exciting event will highlight CONAHEC’s progress to date in building
the North American community through collaboration and it will reveal many emergent opportunities that will allow
us to collectively take the next steps forward. CONAHEC links higher education institutions, government agencies and
partners in industry from Canada, the U.S. and Mexico, and from the rest of the world, in collaboration and cooperation. In Tucson, approximately 200 leaders from higher education, government, industry, funding agencies and
student organizations will convene to chart the course for the next 20 years of international higher education collaboration.
Thank you for joining us.
Sean Manley-Casimir
Executive Director, CONAHEC
Thank You/Gracias
CONAHEC would like to thank the following organizations for their support:
Al CONAHEC le gustaría agradecer a las siguientes organizaciones por su apoyo:
Platinum Sponsor & Host Institution / Patrocinadores Platino y Institución sede
Bronze Sponsors / Patrocinadores Bronce
Conveners / Co-convocantes
Page 3
Conference — At-a-Glance
Wednesday, October 8, 2014 8:00 A.M. - 6:00 P.M. Information and Registration
Arizona Registration Desk
8:00 A.M. - 1:00 P.M. CONAHEC Board of Directors’ Meeting (Closed Meeting)
San Pedro 1&2
8:45 A.M. - 12:00 P.M. Pre-Conference Networking Visit to the Biosphere 2
Hotel Lobby
9:00 A.M. - 12:00 P.M. Pre-Conference Networking Visit to the Mirror Lab
Hotel Lobby
1:00 - 2:30 P.M. Official Conference Opening and Welcoming Remarks
Arizona Ballroom
2:30 - 3:00 P.M. Refreshment Break Exhibitor’s Lobby
3:00 - 4:30 P.M. “Navigating Shifting Paradigms in North American Higher Education Collaboration”
Arizona Ballroom
4:30 – 4:50 P.M. ¡Vamos a Guadalajara!
Arizona Ballroom
4:50 - 5:00 P.M. Invitation from QS Asia
Arizona Ballroom
5:00 - 5:30 P.M. Bus Transportation to The University of Arizona’s Stadium Club
5:30 - 7:30 P.M. Welcome Reception Offered by The University of Arizona
7:30 - 8:00 P.M. Bus Transportation to JW Marriott Starr Pass
JW Marriott Primo Entrance
UA Stadium Club
Thursday, October 9, 2014
7:00 A.M. - 3:00 P.M. Information and Registration for Both CONAHEC and SONA Arizona Registration Desk
7:00 - 8:00 A.M. Continental Breakfast (Open to all Conference Registrants)
Exhibitor’s Lobby
8:00 - 9:30 A.M. UT BIS, A Look Into the Model of Bilingual International and Sustainable Technological Universities
Arizona Ballroom
Internationalization: Trends in English Language Teaching and Training
8:00 - 9:30 A.M.
Towards a North American Model of International, Bilingual and Technologically Intensive Collaboration
The Role of Informal Collaboration and Technology Transfer Between Higher Education Institutions and the Local SMEs an International Case
Exporting Pharmacy Education
8:00 - 9:30 A.M. Towards Internationalization: A Perspective from the South
New Strategies for Traditional Practices: Internationalization
at Home by Using Technology
Building a World-Class College: Maximizing the Potential of the
Global Community at the Community College
8:00 - 9:30 A.M. Creating a Model for International and Local Collaboration: The Experiences of the National Law Center for Inter-American Free Trade in Tucson and the Universidad Mayor in Chile
8:00 - 9:30 A.M. Mexican Student’s Mobility and Quality Assurance
The State of the Bologna Process and the European Higher Education Area
International Acreditation
8:00 - 9:30 A.M. Training Professionals Abroad. A Look at the Formation of the Mexican Political and Scientific Elites
Arizona Ballroom Salon 11
8:00 - 9:30 A.M. Promoting International Development by
Collaborating with Industry
Arizona Ballroom Salon 12
Blending Quantitative and Qualitative Data to Assess the
Impact of Experiential Learning on the Employability of
Page 4
Arizona Ballroom Salon 5
Arizona Ballroom Salon 8
Arizona Ballroom Salon 9
Arizona Ballroom Salon 10
Conference — At-a-Glance
Engineering Graduates Through Industry-University Partnerships
Case History: Texas Eagle Ford/Burgos Basin International
Workforce Challenges
9:30 - 9:45 A.M. Refreshment Break
Exhibitor’s Lobby
9:45 - 11:15 A.M. Overseas Security Advisory Council (OSAC) Country Council Meeting
Arizona Ballroom
9:45 - 11:15 A.M. Using Soccer/Futbol to Get Students Interested in Engineering
Advancing the Internationalization of Higher Education: Lessons Learned from a US-Mexico Partnership to Develop a Joint PhD Degree in Engineering
9:45 - 11:15 A.M. Estudiantes con Experiencia Educativa Previa en los Estados Unidos Inscritos en las Escuelas de Sonora: Su Capital Académico
Arizona Ballroom Salon 5
Arizona Ballroom Salon 8
Sāpo Nistohtamowin: Understanding Our Cultures from the Roots
Up, a Partnership Programming at the University of Saskatchewan
Aboriginal Students Centre and the International Student and Study
Abroad Centre
9:45 - 11:15 A.M. Exploring Effective Internationalization Through an Examination of Student Interaction, Global Learning Initiatives, and Gender and Administration
9:45 - 11:15 A.M. International Student Mobility: UAM- Unidadad Azcapotzalco’s Experience
Communication and Information Networks, as well as Cultural
Interconnections: An Análisis to Understand the New Paradigms
of Internationalization of Higher Ed. Students
9:45 - 11:15 A.M. Linguistic Obstacles: Culture or Education
Student Mobility in the Construction of Peaceful Spaces: The Case of the Autonomous University of Sinaloa
9:45 - 11:15 A.M. Moving Towards a New Era of Canada-Mexico Cooperation in Higher Education
11:15 - 11:30 A.M. Refreshment Break Arizona Ballroom Salon 9
Arizona Ballroom Salon 10
Arizona Ballroom Salon 11
Arizona Ballroom Salon 12
Exhibitor’s Lobby
11:30 A.M - 1:00 P.M. Plenary Session II “Pathways to Internationalization”
Arizona Ballroom
1:00 - 2:15 P.M. Lunch Welcoming New Members (Open to All Attendees)
Arizona Ballroom
2:15 - 3:45 P.M. Developing Intercultural Competence and Transformation:
Mexican and US Variations on a Common Model
Arizona Ballroom
2:15 - 3:45 P.M. How do International Forms of Accreditation Facilitate or Inhibit Collaboration Between Institutions of Higher Education in Mexico and the United States?
A Proposal for Academic Quality Indicators in State Public Universities in Mexico
Online Educational Credential Databases: Fighting Fraud While Highlighting Transparency and Cooperation
2:15 - 3:45 P.M. Sustainability of Chinese Academic Migration: A Leadership Experience for Incoming Chinese International Business Students
Our View of the “The World”: Differentiation in Institutional
Definitions of “World-Class”
Arizona Ballroom Salon 5
Arizona Ballroom Salon 8
Page 5
Conference — At-a-Glance
2:15 - 3:45 P.M. Research and Mobility Programs for International Undergraduate Students at the University of Arizona: A Professional Experience
Arizona Ballroom Salon 9
Summer School: A Strategy to Increase Mobility
2:15 - 3:45 P.M. Globalization of Legal Education
Arizona Ballroom Salon 10
2:15 - 3:45 P.M. Higher Risk Travel
Arizona Ballroom Salon 11
2:15 - 3:45 P.M. The Puentes Consortium
Arizona Ballroom Salon 12
3:45 - 4:00 P.M. Refreshment Break
Exhibitor’s Lobby
4:00 - 5:30 P.M. Plenary Session III “Supporting Regional Engagement Through Innovative International Partnerships”
Arizona Ballroom
5:30 - 6:30 P.M. Break and Bus Transportation to The University of Arizona
6:30 – 8:30 P.M. Awards Dinner
8:30 - 9:00 P.M. Bus Transportation to JW Marriott Starr Pass
JW Marriott Primo Entrance
UA Student Union, North Ballroom
Friday, October 10, 2014
6:00 A.M. – 7:00 A.M. Guided hike in Tucson Mountain Park.
8:00 A.M. - 9:30 A.M. Information and Registration for Both CONAHEC and SONA
Meet in Lobby
Arizona Registration Desk
8:00 A.M. - 9:15 A.M. CONAHEC Information Session Breakfast
Arizona Ballroom
8:00 - 9:15 A.M. Buffet Breakfast
Exhibitor’s Lobby
9:15 - 10:45 A.M. Higher Education International Partnership for Prosperity: A Sustainable Collaboration Between the U.S. and Costa Rica
Arizona Ballroom
9:15 - 10:45 A.M. Interpretation and Translation Training Programs are Key to Global Collaboration: The University of Arizona’s Model Approach
Interdisciplinary Communication: Intercultural and Interlinguistic Challenges
Guías para reanimación o resucitación cardiopulmonar y terapia eléctrica en lenguas indígenas
9:15 - 10:45 A.M. Meeting the Challenges of Students Mobility: A Dual Aerospace Engineering Bachelors Degree Program Across Borders
Internationalize Your Curriculum for Free
9:15 - 10:45 A.M. ULSA Noroeste’s “Centro de Desarrollo Comunitario La Salle”
Advance and Grow, but Never Forget the Basics
9:15 - 10:45 A.M. Posgrados UPAEP, modelo estratégico de colaboración internacional en educación superior
Nuevas tendencias y modelos de la cooperación académico y científica
10:45 - 11:00 A.M. Refreshment Break
Arizona Ballroom Salon 5
Arizona Salon 8
Arizona Salon 9
Arizona Ballroom Salon 10
Exhibitor’s Lobby
11:00 A.M. - 12:30 P.M. Plenary Session IV “The Next 20 Years: Perspectives on the Future of Higher Education Collaboration in North America and the World”
Arizona Ballroom 12:30 - 12:45 P.M. Arizona Ballroom
Closing Remarks “A Renewed Working Agenda North American Higher Education Collaboration”
5:30 P.M. - 6:00 P.M. The Legend of Arriba Abajo Tequila Toast
Salud Terrace
Saturday, October 11, 2014
9:00 A.M. - 12:00 P.M. Post-Conference Networking Visit to the Biosphere2
Page 6
Hotel Lobby
General Conference Information
SONA Conference
CONAHEC is pleased to hold its meeting in conjunction
with the Student Organization of North America’s 11th
Conference
Language Use
Conference business will be conducted in English, Spanish,
and French. Our primary concern is not only clear communication, but also maximum involvement of speakers and
participants of different languages. We encourage participants to express themselves in the language they feel most
comfortable in, provided they can be understood directly
or indirectly by the rest of the audience. If questions are
asked in a language that is not understood by everybody,
the Moderator, one of the speakers or any resource person
in the audience might act as an intermediary.
Interpretation
Erin Chadd
Project Director, UA Office of Global Initiatives
Harmony DeFazio
Director, Study Abroad & Student Exchange, UA Office of
Global Initiatives
Dale LaFleur
Director, Institutional Relations, UA Office of Global Initiatives
Matthew Littler
Web Developer/Designer, Sr., UA Office of Global Initiatives
David Longanecker
President, Western Interstate Commission for Higher Education
(WICHE)
Sean Manley-Casimir
Executive Director, Consortium for North American Higher Education Collaboration (CONAHEC)
Mike Proctor
Vice President, UA Office of Global Initiatives
English/Spanish simultaneous interpretation
will be provided in sessions as indicated by the
symbol visible to the left. French simultaneous
interpretation will not be available. We apologize for the
inconvenience this may occasion.
Noelle Sallaz
Program Director, International Student Development, International Student Services, UA Office of Global Initiatives
Participants will be charged USD 100 for each lost headset,
so please keep track of your device!
Juliana Smith
Business Manager, UA Office of Global Initiatives
Conference Committee
Karen Tumlinson
Assistant Vice President, UA Office of Global Initiatives
Mary Ann Berg
Administrative Associate, UA Office of Global Initiatives
Randy Burd
Assistant Vice President, Program Innovation, UA Office of
Global Initiatives
Frank Camp
Marketing Director, UA Office of Global Initiatives
Ash Scheder Black
Technology Director, UA Office of Global Initiatives
Lula Valdés Scott
Outreach Coordinator, Latin American Collaborations, UA Office
of Global Initiatives
Marianna Velazquez
Membership Coordinator, Consortium for North American Higher
Education Collaboration (CONAHEC)
Page 7
Wednesday, October 8
Tuesday, October 7, 2014
4:00 – 6:00 PM
Arizona Registration Desk
Information and Registration for CONAHEC and SONA
Wednesday, October 8, 2014
6:00 A.M. - 7:00 A.M.
Meet in Lobby
Guided hike in Tucson Mountain Park (Optional - offered by JW Marriott StarrPass)
8:00 A.M. - 6:00 P.M.
Arizona Registration Desk
Information and Registration for CONAHEC and SONA
8:00 A.M. - 1:00 P.M.
San Pedro 1&2
CONAHEC Board of Directors’ Meeting (Closed Meeting)
8:45 A.M. - 12:00 P.M.
JW Marriott Tucson Starr Pass Resort & Spa Lobby
Pre-Conference Networking Visit to the Biosphere 2
Host: Hassan Hijazi
Departure time: 9:00 AM
Cost: $80 (Includes transportation & lunch - pre-purchase tickets at Arizona Ballroom Registration Desk)
Biosphere 2 is located north of Tucson, Arizona at the base of the stunning Santa Catalina Mountains. This one-of-a-kind
University of Arizona owned and operated research facility sits on a ridge at a cool elevation of nearly 4000 feet and is
surrounded by a magnificent natural desert preserve. Here real-time research on the future of our planet unfolds in this
specially designed mini-world containing multiple eco-systems which mimic those of the outside world. Time Life Books
recently named Biosphere 2 one of the 50 must see “Wonders of the World.” We hope you’ll take advantage of this opportunity!
9:00 A.M. - 12:00 P.M.
JW Marriott Tucson Starr Pass Resort & Spa Lobby
Pre-Conference Networking Visit to the Mirror Lab
Host: Donella Ly
Departure time: 9:15 AM
Cost: $30 (Includes transportation - pre-purchase tickets at Arizona Ballroom Registration Desk)
Since 1980 at the University of Arizona’s Steward Observatory Mirror Laboratory, scientists and engineers have been
making giant, lightweight mirrors of unprecedented power for the new generation of optical and infrared telescopes. The
mirrors produced here are used in most of the world’s telescopes. Visit this world class laboratory and see where science’s
hyperopia becomes clear.
Page 8
Arizona Ballroom
Official Conference Opening and Welcoming Remarks
Presidium:
David Atkinson, Vice-President of the Board of Directors of CONAHEC & President of MacEwan University, CANADA
Fernando León-García, Vice President of the Board of Directors of CONAHEC & President of CETYS University, MEXICO
David Longanecker, President of the Board of Directors of CONAHEC & President of the Western Interstate Commission for Higher Education
(WICHE), USA
Sean Manley-Casimir, Executive Director, CONAHEC
Fernando Serrano Migallón, Undersecretary for Higher Education, Secretaría de Educación Pública, Gobierno de la República Mexicana, MEXICO
Ricardo Pineda, Consul General of Mexico in Tucson, Secretaría de Relaciones Exteriores, Gobierno de la República Mexicana, MEXICO
Christopher Teal, Consul General of the US in Nogales
Mike Proctor, Vice President for Global Initiatives, The University of Arizona, USA
Jonathan Rothschild, Mayor, City of Tucson
Andrew Comrie, Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs and Provost, The University of Arizona, USA
Lorna Smith, Director of International Education, Mount Royal University, CANADA
2:30 - 3:00 P.M.
Exhibitor’s Lobby
Refreshment Break
3:00 - 4:30 P.M.
Arizona Ballroom
Plenary Session I “Navigating Shifting Paradigms in North American Higher Education Collaboration”
Facilitator: Fernando León-García, Vice-President of the CONAHEC Board of Directors and President, CETYS University, MEXICO
Panelists:
Gail Bowkett, Director of Research and International Relations, Association of Universities and Colleges of Canada (AUCC), CANADA
Guillermo Hernández-Duque, Director General of Strategic Partnerships, Asociación Nacional de Universidades e Instituciones de Educación Superior (ANUIES), MEXICO
Patti McGill Peterson, Senior Advisor on Global Engagement, American Council on Education (ACE), USA
4:30 – 4:50 P.M.
Arizona Ballroom
¡Vamos a Guadalajara!
Invitation to join the “Mission to Guadalajara”, hosted by the Jalisco Education Group and the Secretary of Education of the State of Jalisco as part of
the CONAHEC Mobility Incubator Program
Page 9
Wednesday, October 8
1:00 - 2:30 P.M.
Wednesday, October 8
4:50 - 5:00 P.M.
Arizona Ballroom
Invitation from QS Asia
Presenter:
Mandy Mok, Chief Executive Officer, Quacquarelli Symonds Asia, SINGAPORE
5:00 - 5:30 P.M.
JW Marriott Primo Entrance
Bus Transportation to The University of Arizona’s Stadium Club
5:30 - 7:30 P.M.
The University of Arizona Stadium Club
Welcome Reception Offered by The University of Arizona
7:30 - 8:00 P.M.
Bus Transportation to JW Marriott Starr Pass
Page 10
6:00 A.M. – 7:00 A.M.
Meet in Hotel’s Main Lobby
Guided hike in Tucson Mountain Park (Optional - offered by JW Marriott StarrPass)
7:00 A.M. - 3:00 P.M.
Arizona Registration Desk
Information and Registration for CONAHEC and SONA
7:00 - 8:00 A.M.
Exhibitor’s Lobby
Continental Breakfast (Open to all Conference Registrants)
8:00 - 9:30 A.M.
Arizona Ballroom Concurrent Session 1A
Moderator: Suzanne Panferov, Director, Center for English as a Second Language, The University of Arizona, USA
UT BIS, a Look into the Model of Bilingual International and Sustainable Technological Universities
Elva Patricia Saracho, Head Director, Universidad Tecnológica El Retoño, MEXICO
Luis Felipe Alvarez, Head Director, Universidad Tecnológica de Saltillo, MEXICO
Jesús Román, Language Department Coordinator, Universidad Tecnológica El Retoño, MEXICO
Providing insight into a groundbreaking modality of public education in Mexico that is entirely bilingual and international offered by Technological
Universities operating in different states of the country, this vanguard model of higher education in Mexico is unique in Latin America and operates
under an English-Spanish pedagogical scheme. Courses at these institutions are offered mostly in English by qualified and certified teaching staff. This
presentation will introduce the history of this groundbreaking concept. Strategies followed to make these technological university students truly bilingual and with an international vision will be explained. Details of faculty and student mobility agreements signed with other educational institutes
abroad to support, encourage and enhance the international nature of these institutions will be discussed. This presentation is intended for faculty
and staff members as well as senior college administrators, government agencies and association representatives or others from similar institutions.
Internationalization: Trends in English Language Teaching and Training
Language of Presentation: English
Suzanne Panferov, Director, Center for English as a Second Language, The University of Arizona, USA
Linda Chu, Assistant Director of Global Programs, Center for English as a Second Language, The University of Arizona, USA
The methods and systems we use to learn and teach the English language are constantly changing. The idea of the classroom has expanded to include
a myriad of ways to deliver content. The traditional student has also changed. There is an ever-growing demand for courses to be taught in English.
To stay current we cannot ignore using new technology. We need to explore ways to think outside of the box when it comes to language education.
The presenters will discuss current and future trends in the field of English language training and teaching. Included are issues concerning student
and teacher mobility, non-traditional methods of delivering courses, English for Specific Purposes (ESP) and program administration. The demand for
internationalizing our campuses has led to a need for improvement in English language skills and teaching methodologies of content-area teachers.
The discussion will touch on delivery of teacher training using online courses and hybrid courses using a face-to-face and online combination. The
presenters will discuss trends in requests for ESP material, and the process for turning requests into concrete and deliverable courses.
8:00 - 9:30 A.M.
Arizona Ballroom Salon 5
Concurrent Session 1B
Moderator: Adriela Fernández, Director of Latin American Programs, Purdue University, United States
Towards a North American Model of International, Bilingual and Technologically Intensive Collaboration
Language of Presentation: English
Adriela Fernandez, Director of Latin American Programs, Purdue University, USA
Renee Valentina Lopez-Fernández, Instructor, ITESM Mexico City, MEXICO
This presentation proposes for the CONAHEC area one of the most innovative international collaborations developed in the Americas: a three-institution (two Mexican or Canadian universities and one US university), jointly taught, bilingual, technology-intensive class. Addressing some of the
most pressing issues of our time is this course on Food Security and Sustainable Development. It will have, at all times, two groups of students in the
classroom: a US group and a Mexican or Canadian group plus their instructors while connected to the third institution via video conference. Students
and faculty must work one week on each campus. We recommend groundbreaking solutions to the academic rigor, cultural, linguistic, and technology
competencies needed for our students in the 21st Century. This model is especially well suited to the North America area with the possibility of three
institutions and two languages or three institutions and three languages. The team-work component for the students which must present a multimedia group’s work in a language or languages of their choosing plus a final individual research paper ensures a real connection among students and
great quality contributions.
Page 11
Thursday, October 9
Language of Presentation: English
The Role of Informal Collaboration and Technology Transfer between Higher Education Institutions and the Local
SMEs an International Case
Language of Presentation: Spanish
Juan Manuel Salinas Escandon, Information Technology Group, Faculty of Commerce, Administration and Social Sciences, Universidad Autónoma de
Tamaulipas, MEXICO
This qualitative-exploratory study aims to discover and understand the degree of propensity, characteristics, academic expectations, and type of
collaboration in the area of information technologies that have been informally transferred from the faculty in local public universities to Small and
Medium Enterprises (SMEs) in Nuevo Laredo, Tamaulipas, México and Laredo, Texas, USA. The purpose of this research is to describe the characteristics and understand the reasons of faculty members who engage in this kind of informal collaboration in information technology transfer at the
regional SMEs.
Exporting Pharmacy Education
Language of Presentation: English
Terry Urbine, Instructor, Pharmacy Practice and Science, University of Arizona College of Pharmacy, USA
The goal of this project is to determine the international market size, demand, and value for US-originated graduate education and training for pharmacists in Mexico, Canada and beyond. Language barriers and the economics of online delivery methods will be assessed. Classes at the University of
Arizona College of Pharmacy are currently being converted to a hybrid online format to expand reach and reduce costs. These steps are intended to
enable content delivery and exchange with other US pharmacy colleges via economies of scale. This logic might apply internationally as well.
Thursday, October 9
8:00 - 9:30 A.M.
Arizona Ballroom Salon 8
Concurrent Session 1C
Moderator: Nadia Mireles, Head of the Office of Cooperation and Internationalization, Universidad de Guadalajara, MEXICO
Towards Internationalization: A Perspective from the South
Language of Presentation: English
Juan Luis Mérega, Undersecretary for Institutional Relations, Universidad Nacional de Quilmes, ARGENTINA
Internationalization policies are the response of universities to a world which is increasingly global and knowledge-driven. But the concept of internationalization includes multiple interpretations and questions. Should we consider education as a human right or education as a commodity? Should
we make a choice between international cooperation and international competence? What is more important, international mobility or internationalization at home? These questions should be answered by universities from developing countries, as they face a challenge when they decide to interact with universities from all over the world. It is necessary to make institutional decisions in order to define appropriate policies which would allow a
broad coverage of access to an education of quality and to international programs. The main goal should be to educate citizens and professionals who
are able to interact in a global world, but who are also useful in the development of their countries. Internationalization is a key instrument to this
achievement.
New Strategies for Traditional Practices: Internationalization at Home by Using Technology
Language of Presentation: English
Nadia Mireles, Head of the Office of Cooperation and Internationalization, University of Guadalajara, MEXICO
Maria Guadalupe Ureña, Responsible for the Self-Access Language Center, University of Guadalajara, South Center, MEXICO
This presentation briefly discusses the University of Guadalajara’s new internationalization model and the implementation of policies aimed at internationalization at home, a concept that assumes that internationalization must go beyond physical mobility. The internationalization model implemented since 2013 at the University of Guadalajara has five strategies that impact the entire institution. These allow setting priorities and decision
criteria, and guide the efforts of operational programs. The strategies are implemented and operate through programs that can be adapted or generated by each University Center of the University of Guadalajara Network, according to their characteristics and needs. The strategies help strengthen
and build the culture and commitment to internationalization, as well as the process of integrating international, intercultural, global and comparative
dimensions in the substantive functions of the institution. The five strategies are: Management, Culture, Mobility, Languages, and Internationalization
at Home.
Building a World-Class College: Maximizing the Potential of the Global Community at the Community College
Language of Presentation: English
Ricardo Castro-Salazar, Instructional Faculty, Department of Social and Behavioral Sciences, Pima Community College, USA
Community colleges today prepare a growing number of US and international students for businesses, industries, and fields that are becoming increasingly globalized. Thus, internationalization represents not only an opportunity, but a necessity. This presentation highlights current demographic,
economic and educational trends and proposes a holistic international paradigm for the future: A community college that develops global citizens for
the world arena, while continuing to respond to workforce and educational needs of the local community.
Page 12
8:00 - 9:30 A.M.
Arizona Ballroom Salon 9
Concurrent Session 1D
Moderator: Elizabeth Pocock, Supervising Research Attorney and Development Coordinator, National Law Center for Inter-American Free
Trade, USA
Creating a Model for International and Local Collaboration: The Experiences of the National Law Center for InterAmerican Free Trade in Tucson and the Universidad Mayor in Chile
Language of Presentation: English
Elizabeth Pocock, Supervising Research Attorney and Development Coordinator, National Law Center for Inter-American Free Trade, USA
Rodrigo Novoa, Executive Director of NatLaw Chile, Board Member of NatLaw in Tucson, Universidad Mayor, CHILE
Michael Mandig, Board Member and Training Instructor, National Law Center for Inter-American Free Trade, USA
The National Law Center for Inter-American Free Trade (NatLaw) is a Tucson based non-profit education and research institution affiliated with the
University of Arizona College of Law. Through its collaboration with the University of Arizona and its alumni, NatLaw addresses various global challenges and works to promote best practices in both law reform and capacity building projects all over the world. The relationships formed by NatLaw
with past students and other partners of the U of A have provided the building blocks for many cooperative and impactful projects, not just in the
area of law. In the last few years, NatLaw has partnered with the Universidad de Mayor in Chile to create a sister center in Santiago. This sister center
is now starting to become involved with one of NatLaw’s most successful recent projects training both judges and lawyers throughout Latin America.
Join NatLaw’s development team and the Universidad de Mayor, along with other individuals involved in these collaborations including one of NatLaw’s Board members and training instructors, to learn more about the projects made possible by these relationships.
Arizona Ballroom Salon 10
Concurrent Session 1E
Moderator: María Eugenia Bolaños, Coordinator, Federación de Instituciones Mexicanas Particulares de Educación Superior (FIMPES),
MEXICO
Mexican Student’s Mobility and Quality Assurance
Language of Presentation: English
Maria Eugenia Bolanos, Coordinator, Accreditation System, Federación de Instituciones Mexicanas Particulares de Educación Superior (FIMPES),
MEXICO
Student mobility has become part of the efforts of universities in Mexico to embrace internationalization. Every semester students from Mexican private institutions travel to different countries in pursuit of international experience. Recently, the results of an instrument were published giving us an
indication of the trends in Mexican student mobility. An interesting aspect of the results is that most students who participate in mobility experiences
come from private institutions, which generates several questions regarding the capacity of private universities to provide extra services to students,
especially in light of the fact that they do not receive public or federal funding. Institutional accreditation has been done in private universities exclusively by FIMPES since 1992. To date, 114 Mexican universities are working on their accreditation processes. FIMPES’ accreditation system includes
the revision of the capacity and the effectiveness of private institutions according to the mission statement of each. Mobility programs are part of the
internationalization efforts of FIMPES’ accredited institutions and are assessed. During this presentation we will talk about student mobility data in
FIMPES universities and its relationship with quality assurance.
The State of the Bologna Process and the European Higher Education Area
Language of Presentation: English
Kevin Rolwing, Assistant Director, Evaluations, World Education Services, USA
The “Bologna Process” is an on-going and wide-ranging university reform process still being implemented across the European landscape and beyond. Our session will examine the history, objectives and current status of the reforms and the resulting implications for Canadian, Mexican and U.S.
university admissions officials, particularly in regard to the Bologna three-year bachelor’s degree. We will also look at the Bologna Process internationalization objectives and achievements.
International Accreditation
Language of Presentation: Spanish
Eduardo Ávalos, President of the Board, Consejo de Acreditación en Ciencias Sociales, Contables y Administrativas en la Educación Superior de Latinoamérica (CACSLA), MEXICO
This presentation will reflect on higher education, its influences, trends and quality assurance mechanisms in the international context. The case of
the Council for Accreditation of the Social Sciences, Accounting and Administration in Latin American Higher Education (CACSLA) will be presented.
Both the instrument used by CACSLA, which evaluates 12 standards, as well as the conclusions that it has come to in its evaluation and research work
will be discussed.
Page 13
Thursday, October 9
8:00 - 9:30 A.M.
8:00 - 9:30 A.M.
Arizona Ballroom Salon 11
Concurrent Session 1F
Moderator: Mónica López Ramírez, PhD Student in the Sociology Program, El Colegio de México, MEXICO
Training Professionals Abroad: A Look at the Formation of the Mexican Political and Scientific Elites
Language of Presentation: English
Mónica López Ramírez, PhD Student in the Sociology Program, El Colegio de México, MEXICO
Maria del Rocio Grediaga Kuri, Full-Time Research Professor, Sociology, Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana, Campus Azcapotzalco, MEXICO
María Magdalena Fresan Orozco, Full-Time Research Professor Titular C, Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana, Cuajimalpa Campus, MEXICO
ROMAC is an international network bringing together researchers from Mexico and six countries of North America and Europe on issues of study
and academic mobility, elite formation in Mexico and knowledge circulation between countries. We will review and discuss different aspects of our
research at HEIs from six developed countries; Canada, USA, France, Germany, Spain and the UK: a) the reasons to study abroad and experiences of
Mexicans studying graduate engineering programs abroad; b) the changing trends in the distribution between generations (1996 to 2013) of CONACYT applicants and scholarships between countries and disciplinary fields in the main academic destinations; c) where members of the national
research system (SNI) obtained their master’s and PhD degrees and the impact of different countries of study on their academic network building
and international cooperation; and d) the highest degrees and places of study of government officials from the Calderón and first year of Peña Nieto
periods.
Thursday, October 9
8:00 - 9:30 A.M.
Arizona Ballroom Salon 12
Concurrent Session 1G
Moderator: María Eugenia Calderón-Porter, Asst. Vice President, Texas A&M International University, USA
Promoting International Development by Collaborating with Industry
Language of Presentation: English
José Arroyo, Outreach Director, CETYS Universidad, MEXICO
The partnership between CETYS University (located in Mexicali, Mexico), Honeywell and other regional industries has led to institutional capacitybuilding, leadership training, workforce development and internationalization, while supporting and enhancing a collaboration agenda with government. From this collaboration have emerged self-sustained initiatives supporting STEM at elementary and high school levels, resulting in higher
enrollment especially in engineering programs.
Blending Quantitative and Qualitative Data to Assess the Impact of Experiential Learning on the Employability of
Engineering Graduates Through Industry-University Partnerships
Language of Presentation: English
Imelda Olague-Caballero, Research Assistant, Industrial Engineering, New Mexico State University, USA
Delia Valles-Rosales, Associate Professor, Department of Industrial Engineering, New Mexico State University, USA
Currently there is a worldwide trend to produce highly skilled and culturally competent engineers employable upon graduation. However, colleges
and universities are being questioned about their ability to equip graduate engineers to meet employers’ expectations. Experiential learning has
been used to help remediate this situation based on its capacity to foster skills and abilities more effectively learned outside a formal curriculum,
specifically in real world scenarios. To understand the implications that experiential learning has on the employability of engineering graduates, an
industry-university collaboration was evaluated. The objective was to investigate the impact that working in real world scenarios has on the development of soft skills, cultural competency, and self-efficacy beliefs among students participating in the program. This paper presents an overview of the
industry-university collaboration and the metrics and methodology used to evaluate the program. The research looked for evidence that this intervention improved the employability of engineering students by providing opportunities to increase their self-efficacy beliefs while acquiring soft skills
and becoming culturally competent. Partial results indicated that the successful design and deployment of the program depends on the stakeholder
engagement, constant monitoring of students, and close communication with the industry partner.
Case History: Texas Eagle Ford/Burgos Basin International Workforce Challenges
Language of Presentation: English
Maria Eugenia Calderon-Porter, Assistant Vice President, Office of the Provost-Global Initiatives, Texas A&M International University, USA
The International Shale plays known as Eagle Ford and Burgos Basin have presented a new challenge to the regional educational community. The Texas Shale Boom has created demands for a professional workforce that is not easily found in the rural areas of Texas. In addition, the Mexican Energy
Reforms have opened the door to exploration by foreign investors in their northern region. Ideally the existing workforce in Texas could participate
in the oilfield development of the Northern region of Mexico. This is not likely to occur as Texas oilfields have enough work to keep their scarce labor
force engaged for many years into the future. Texas A&M International University (TAMIU) is meeting the challenge by creating educational venues
that can lead American and Mexican university students into an international petroleum industry workforce.
Page 14
9:30 - 9:45 A.M.
Exhibitor’s Lobby
Refreshment Break
9:45 - 11:15 A.M.
Arizona Ballroom
Concurrent Session 2A
Moderator: Laura Provencher, International Risk Analyst, The University of Arizona, USA
Overseas Security Advisory Council (OSAC) Country Council Meeting - Nogales, Mexico
Language of Presentation: English
The Overseas Security Advisory Council (OSAC) is a Federal Advisory Committee with a U.S. Government Charter to promote security cooperation
between American business and private sector interests worldwide and the U.S. Department of State. The office is led by an Executive Council of private sector organizations and the Bureau of Diplomatic Security, under the U.S. Department of State. Information is shared via email, telephone, and
in-office consultations on a variety of security concerns, including crime, terrorism, contingency planning, and information security.
9:45 - 11:15 A.M.
Arizona Ballroom Salon 5
Concurrent Session 2B
Using Soccer/Fútbol to Get Students Interested in Engineering
Language of Presentation: English
Ricardo Valerdi, Associate Professor, Systems and Industrial Engineering, University of Arizona, USA
This presentation will describe an exchange program between the University of Arizona (UA) and Instituto Tecnológico y de Estudios Superiores de
Monterrey (ITESM) Campus Sonora focused on engineering. In particular, we will describe a 3-week custom course designed for engineering students
from ITESM interested in systems engineering at UA in the Summer 2014. The focus of the course was for students to design soccer/fútbol playing
robots as a way to learn about product development and systems engineering. Lessons learned from the process will be shared with the intent to
improve the program so that it can be repeated in the future.
Advancing the Internationalization of Higher Education: Lessons Learned from a US-Mexico Partnership to Develop a Joint PhD Degree in Engineering
Language of Presentation: English
Imelda Olague, Research Assistant, Industrial Engineering, New Mexico State University, USA
Ricardo Torres-Knight, Dean of Engineering, Universidad Autónoma de Chihuahua, MEXICO
Cecilia Olague, Professor & Researcher, Universidad Autónoma de Chihuahua, MEXICO
This case study documents a bi-national initiative to offer new perspectives on the internationalization of higher education. The goal was to address
the impact that globalization is having on higher education and promote the training of more competitive researchers capable of contributing to the
betterment of their home countries. The challenge was to design and implement effective strategies to share academic supervisory responsibilities
at a PhD level while addressing curriculum development and student mobility. An overview of the agreement, program procedures for admission and
degree granting requirements is provided. At present, two students have been transferred from UACH to NMSU as part of this program whose areas
of specialization include structural and geotechnical engineering, with estimated graduation dates of 2015 and 2016 respectively. The program was
recently reviewed using a SWOT (strengths, weakness, opportunities, and threats) analysis and a Logic Model to identify areas of opportunity and to
review the relationship between program goals and outcomes. The impact of cultural competence and self-efficacy beliefs on student performance
was also considered to provide recommendations for program improvement.
9:45 - 11:15 A.M.
Arizona Ballroom Salon 8
Concurrent Session 2C
Moderator: Toni Griego-Jones, Professor, The University of Arizona, USA
Students with Previous Learning Experience in the US Enrolled in Schools in Sonora: An Academic Resource
Language of Presentation: Spanish
Yamilet Martinez, Doctoral Student, Department of Teaching, Learning and Sociocultural Studies, Universidad de Arizona, MEXICO
Toni Griego-Jones, Professor, Teaching, Learning, & Sociocultural Studies, The University of Arizona, USA
A qualitative research study will be presented which identifies characteristics in the development of language (Spanish and English), social development and academic capital of students with prior educational experience in the US and who are now attending schools in Sonora. Students and their
parents, who for a period of time lived in the US, provide their testimonies and, together with their teachers, analyze the educational implications
of this return migration from the perspective of transnationalism. The goal is to increase the visibility of these students, who continue to acquire a
greater presence in Sonoran classrooms, by ascribing value to their social and academic capital and formulating pertinent educational proposals with
their needs in mind. The particularities of the Sonora-Arizona region are recognized for their geographic, economic and social peculiarities which
permit the generation of an enriched focus of transnational networks on strengthening the identities and education of transnational children.
Page 15
Thursday, October 9
Moderator: Imelda Olague, Research Assistant, New Mexico State University, USA
Sāpo Nistohtamowin: Understanding Our Cultures from the Roots Up, a Partnership Programming at the University of Saskatchewan Aboriginal Students Centre and the International Student and Study Abroad Centre
Language of Presentation: English
Davida Bentham, Special Projects Officer, International Student and Study Abroad Centre, University of Saskatchewan, CANADA
Janelle Pewapsconias, Student Assistant, Aboriginal Students’ Centre, The University of Saskatchewan, Canada
The Aboriginal Students’ Centre (ASC) and International Student and Study Abroad Centre (ISSAC) partnered in September of 2013 to provide programming for the whole campus community, with a focus on international and Aboriginal relations and cultural understanding. The mission of this
programming is to provide a space and place to learn about Indigenous and non-Indigenous cultures (cultural intelligence), dispel myths, ask questions, promote commonalities and respectfully understand our differences (appreciative inquiry) through an anti-oppressive lens working towards
equity and social justice. This partnership has provided a student lead opportunity to actively engage and create space for cross-cultural understanding and appreciation to flourish.
9:45 - 11:15 A.M.
Arizona Ballroom Salon 9
Concurrent Session 2D
Moderator: Dr. Mandy Hansen, Director of International Admissions and Recruitment, Northern Arizona University, USA
Exploring Effective Internationalization through an Examination of Student Interaction, Global Learning Initiatives, and Gender and Administration
Thursday, October 9
Language of Presentation: English
Dr. Mandy Hansen, Director, Center for International Education, Northern Arizona University, USA
Angela Miller, Assistant Director, Center for International Education, Northern Arizona University, USA
Samantha Clifford, Coordinator, Northern Arizona University, USA
The panel will discuss research which helps to inform and provide a deeper understanding of global learning initiatives, student interaction, and
gender within the administration of international education. This session will explore three research projects within the field of international education. Topics include (1) international and domestic student interaction fostered through curriculum; (2) global learning for all; and (3) women in senior
international officer positions and their experiences with gender. The panel discussion will include time for each presenter to discuss lessons learned,
challenges and issues encountered and how those were addressed in the research process. The remainder of the session will focus on brainstorming
and sharing information on how those present can carry out their responsibilities and develop new ideas for internationalization at their institutions.
9:45 - 11:15 A.M.
Arizona Ballroom Salon 10
Concurrent Session 2E
Moderator: Romualdo López, Rector de la Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana, Unidad Azcapotzalco, Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana, MEXICO
International Student Mobility: UAM- Unidad Azcapotzalco’s Experience
Language of Presentation: Spanish
Romualdo López, Rector, Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana, MEXICO
Eduardo de la Garza, General Coordinator for Academic Development, Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana, MEXICO
Student mobility at higher education institutions has acquired increasing importance in recent years, primarily because of: 1) the opportunity that
it holds, through the recognition and mutual support between student and institution, to promote equity, the development of critical thinking and
the strengthening of the capacity to adapt to contribute to the economic, social and cultural wellbeing of the communities, 2) its procurement of
the national and international dimension of knowledge, and formation of professionals and researchers with a wide vision of the world and a better
capacity to adapt to change and 3) how it teaches the student to manage his/her life, facing difficulties and overcoming challenges. It is profound
preparation for life. The goal of this presentation is to share the experience of the Universidad Autónoma de Mexico - Unidad Azcapotzalco in terms
of student mobility within the processes of internationalization of higher education, the expansion of academic and scientific networks, regional
integration and educational cooperation.
Communication and Information Networks and Cultural Interconnections: Understanding New Paradigms of Internationalization of Higher Education Students
Language of Presentation: Spanish
Kenno Aleen Amador Cervantes, General Counsel, Office of the President, Universidad Tecnológica de La Paz, MEXICO
New communication systems permit individuals to interact within, and gain access to, diverse social environments thanks to which they are able to
bridge geographic boundaries that previously impeded contact, making possible what once was impossible. This is one of the primary objectives of
this research, oriented towards understanding globalization within this context. Globalization refers to distinct processes and dimensions, responds to
secular historical trends with identifiable backgrounds; is irregular, that is to say, its impact is variable in different countries and circumstances, such
as in terms of the position of the State in the global political and military situation; the position of the State in the international division of labor; and
the internal consolidation of the nation-state institutions among others.
Page 16
9:45 - 11:15 A.M.
Arizona Ballroom Salon 11
Concurrent Session 2F
Moderator: Aurora Bustillo, Professor of Planning, Universidad Autónoma de Coahuila, MEXICO
Linguistic Obstacles: Culture or Education
Language of Presentation: Spanish
Aurora Bustillo, Professor of Planning, Universidad Autónoma de Coahuila, MEXICO
Through the years, Mexican public higher education institutions have attempted to broaden international experiences. Although results have improved, access to these experiences continues to be limited. One of the reasons is language. This group of teachers reflects on the source of this
problem: is it cultural or is it the educational model?
Student Mobility in the Construction of Peaceful Spaces: The Case of the Autonomous University of Sinaloa
Language of Presentation: Spanish
América Lizárraga González, Director of Outreach and International Relations, Universidad Autónoma de Sinaloa, MEXICO
As a strategy for internationalizing higher education, student mobility is proposed as one of the means to construct peaceful spaces in academic
and social environments. This presentation analyzes the case of an international mobility program that has been implemented at the Universidad
Autónoma de Sinaloa (UAS) and its impact on the construction of a culture of peace.
9:45 - 11:15 A.M.
Moderator: Rachel Lindsey, Senior Policy Analyst, International Relations, Association of Universities and Colleges of Canada (AUCC),
CANADA
Moving Towards a New Era of Canada-Mexico Cooperation in Higher Education
Language of Presentation: English
Rachel Lindsey, Senior Policy Analyst, International Relations, Association of Universities and Colleges of Canada (AUCC), CANADA
Guillermo Hernández Duque Delgadillo, Director General of Strategic Partnerships, Asociación Nacional de Universidades e Instituciones de Educación Superior (ANUIES), MEXICO
As the respective national representatives of Canada and Mexico’s universities, the Association of Universities and Colleges of Canada (AUCC) and the
Asociación Nacional de Universidades e Instituciones de Educación Superior en México (ANUIES) are key stakeholders in their respective countries’
internationalization agendas. As such, they have an important role to play in creating spaces for dialogue between Canadian and Mexican higher
education institutions and policy makers that advance the Canada-Mexico bilateral higher education relationship. As a demonstration of commitment to this role, in September 2014, AUCC, with strong support from ANUIES, will lead a high-level delegation of 23 high-level Canadian university
representatives to Mexico to engage with key institutional partners and government stakeholders in Mexico City and attend the annual international
meeting of ANUIES, hosted by Universidad Autónoma de Chiapas. During this visit, Canadian and Mexican universities will have an opportunity to
address a number of common issues and goals related to internationalization through peer-to-peer exchange of information, ideas and best-practices,
and identification of new opportunities for partnerships. The visit will also engage key policy-makers from both Canada and Mexico and help to
inform the design of national-level internationalization strategies, such as the Mexico country strategy for Canada’s recently launched International
Education Strategy. Join AUCC and ANUIES for a live debrief of the September 2014 Canadian university visit to Mexico and a look ahead at the future
of Canada-Mexico cooperation in higher education.
11:15 - 11:30 A.M.
Exhibitor’s Lobby
Refreshment Break
Page 17
Thursday, October 9
Arizona Ballroom Salon 12
Concurrent Session 2G
11:30 A.M - 1:00 P.M.
Arizona Ballroom
Plenary Session II “Pathways to Internationalization”
Facilitator: Suzanne Panferov, Director, Center for English as a Second Language, University of Arizona, USA
Presenters:
Hector Arreola Soria, Coordinator General of Mexico’s Technological and Polytechnic Universities, Secretaría de Educación Pública, Gobierno de la
República Mexicana, MEXICO
Matt Clausen, Vice President, Partners of the Americas, USA
Jorge de la Torre Rosas, Director of Institutional Relations, Santander Universities, USA
Martha Navarro, General Coordinator of Proyecta 100,000 and Deputy Director General for Academic Cooperation, Mexican Agency for International Cooperation for Development (AMEXCyD), Secretary of External Relations, Gobierno de la República Mexicana, MEXICO
1:00 - 2:15 P.M.
Arizona Ballroom
Lunch Welcoming New Members (Open to All Attendees)
Thursday, October 9
2:15 - 3:45 P.M.
Arizona Ballroom
Concurrent Session 3A
Moderator: Kris Lou, Director, Office of International Education and Associate Professor of
International Studies, Willamette University, USA
Developing Intercultural Competence and Transformation: Mexican and US Variations on a Common Model
Language of Presentation: English
Kris Lou, Director of International Education and Associate Professor of International Studies, Willamette University, USA
Gabriele Bosley, Director of International Programs and Professor of Global Languages and Cultures, Bellarmine University, USA
Thomas Buntru, Director of International Programs, Universidad de Monterrey (UDEM), MEXICO
This session addresses the effectiveness of combining theory, research, and curriculum design in delivering an intercultural course (both on-line and
in situ) that connects students across the globe and on our campuses in Mexico and in the US around common intercultural challenges from the
vantage points of many different cultural contexts. Panelists from three different universities (one in Mexico and two in the US) will present their
variations on a common intervention model that utilizes an empirical assessment instrument as both a learning tool and a means of measuring intercultural development with pre- and post-study abroad testing. Presenters will speak to the effectiveness of the model in their specific institutional
contexts, describe the implementation of each, and offer tips on how to adopt and adapt the model to varying institutional and study abroad program
constraints and opportunities.
2:15 - 3:45 P.M.
Arizona Ballroom Salon 5
Concurrent Session 3B
Moderator: Chester Haskell, Consulting Director, International Professional Programs, University of California – San Diego, USA
How do International Forms of Accreditation Facilitate or Inhibit Collaboration between Institutions of Higher
Education in Mexico and the United States?
Language of Presentation: English
Chester Haskell, Consulting Director, International Professional Programs, University of California - San Diego, USA
There is great interest in Mexico (and elsewhere) in international forms of accreditation as institutions of higher education seek to improve quality,
enhance reputations and create partnerships with US institutions that will promote student and graduate mobility. However, international accreditation of Mexican institutions is very limited. Does this have to be a barrier to greater collaboration? How can Mexican institutions that are not internationally accredited improve their opportunities for partnerships?
A Proposal for Academic Quality Indicators in State Public Universities in Mexico
Language of Presentation: English
Martin Pantoja, Professor, Department of Entrepreneurship and Business Management, Universidad de Guanajuato, MEXICO
Given the ongoing debate about the concept of quality in the field of education, in this study the concept of academic quality of higher education institutions is analyzed through the determinants and dimensions of quality. Due to the boom and high impact of international rankings and the federal
policies and programs for higher education in Mexico in recent decades, the public state universities (UPES-in Spanish) have been forced to follow
trends and meet academic indicators to validate them before society and ensure access to funds. To take advantage of this moment and direct efforts
of UPES towards consolidation of academic quality, an analysis of the indicators used by the major international rankings and the various government agencies and university associations took place. A proposal of academic quality indicators applicable to UPES in Mexico was developed and the
proposed indicators were classified according to their scope of correspondence.
Page 18
Online Educational Credential Databases: Fighting Fraud While Highlighting Transparency and Cooperation
Language of Presentation: English
Martha Van Devender, Senior Evaluator, Educational Credential Evaluators, USA
The increased perception of fraud in higher educational documentation has led to some novel online solutions to address these concerns. Join us for
a show and tell of different formats of online credential databases, with results ranging from diploma titles to fully digitized versions of the documentation. While the most obvious beneficiary of these online resources is potential employers, these tools can also be used by international education
professionals. Learn how you can benefit from these particular demonstrations of government transparency and cooperation.
2:15 - 3:45 P.M.
Arizona Ballroom Salon 8
Concurrent Session 3C
Moderator: Gabriela Valdez, Program Coordinator, The University of Arizona, USA
Sustainability of Chinese Academic Migration: A Leadership Experience for Incoming Chinese International Business Students
Language of Presentation: English
Our View of the “The World”: Differentiation in Institutional Definitions of “World-Class”
Language of Presentation: English
Russel Potter, Advising Specialist, Colleges of Letters, Arts, and Science, University of Arizona, USA
Universities in the United States pride themselves on being “world class”. This presentation presents an analysis of how six U.S. research universities
define the term “world class”, and how these different definitions shape their vision, mission, and institutional identities.
2:15 - 3:45 P.M.
Arizona Ballroom Salon 9
Concurrent Session 3D
Moderator: Nadia Álvarez Mexía, Director of Latin American Initiatives, Graduate College, The University of Arizona, USA
Research and Mobility Programs for International Undergraduate Students at the University of Arizona: A Professional Experience
Language of Presentation: English
Nadia Alvarez Mexia, Director, Latin American Initiatives, Graduate College, University of Arizona, USA
Adrián Arroyo, Graduate Student, University of Arizona, USA
Participants will obtain detailed information about international undergraduate research and mobility programs including aspects such as activities,
costs and participant profiles. During this presentation, former students will discuss how these programs helped them build their professional careers
in science, technology, social sciences and education. The presentation also includes faculty member and home institution opinions regarding the
programs and their impact within the international higher education community.
Summer School: A Strategy to Increase Mobility
Language of Presentation: English
Maria Mahauad, Mobility Coordinator, Department of International Relations, Universidad Técnica Particular de Loja, ECUADOR
Ana Bravo, Coordinator of International Cooperation, Universidad Técnica Particular de Loja, Ecuador
Summer School: A Strategy to Increase Mobility - Thinking Globally and Acting Locally is the vision of UTPL’s internationalization process. International alliances, bi-national projects, participation in networks, agreements, counseling and internships for teachers and students are UTPL´s strategies.
Mobility is essential to ensure high quality higher education and it is also an important pillar for exchange and collaboration with other parts of the
world. Promoting high quality mobility of students, early stage researchers, teachers and other staff in higher education has been a central objective of UTPL. The UTPL has five mobility programs: Undergraduate Exchange Program; Undergraduate and Graduate Internships; Undergraduate and
Graduate Summer School; Undergraduate and Graduate Research Exchange Programs and Faculty and Staff Mobility.
Page 19
Thursday, October 9
Gabriela Valdez, Program Coordinator, Eller College of Management, The University of Arizona, USA
The number of Chinese international undergraduate students in the U.S. has increased in the last few years, especially in the field of business. This
session will be an overview of the Eller Global Business Leader (EGBL) program, a successful program for incoming Chinese international undergraduate business students. The main goal of EGBL is to create opportunities for students to acquire communication and business skills needed to
be successful in an undergraduate program in business in the U.S and to internationalize the college learning environment. The program meets its
objectives by incorporating different cultural activities, case competitions and numerous professional development workshops. Similarly, this program
helps to internationalize the college by promoting Chinese cultural activities and collaborating with different groups of American students. EGBL had
a high retention rate during its first year compared to similar programs and the students had significantly higher GPAs than international business
students who did not participate.
2:15 - 3:45 P.M.
Arizona Ballroom Salon 10
Concurrent Session 3E
Moderator: Sergio Puig, Associate Professor, James E. Rogers College of Law, The University of Arizona, USA
Globalization of Legal Education
Language of Presentation: English
Thursday, October 9
Sergio Puig, Associate Professor, James E. Rogers College of Law, University of Arizona, USA
Cristina Castañeda, Director of Global Programs, James E. Rogers College of Law, The University of Arizona, USA
Jaime Olaiz-Gonzalez, Professor of International Law and American Jurisprudence, Universidad Panamericana, MEXICO
Paola Cravioto, JD Candidate, James E. Rogers College of Law, The University of Arizona, USA
Arizona Law has become a leader in global legal education. Our growing Global Programs take Arizona Law to other law schools around the globe and
also bring extraordinary new knowledge and perspectives back into our classrooms. For example, our JD program for Non-U.S. lawyers brings more
than 25% of the incoming JD class. No other U.S. law school comes close to such global diversity in its JD class. Our Global Law Partnership Program
provides non-U.S. students with the opportunity to earn their undergraduate law degree from their home country and a JD from Arizona Law in two
years less than it would take to earn both degrees separately. We have entered into 12 such dual degree partnerships in the last 3 years, with 7 more
in various stages of negotiation. Connecting global legal education with technology, Arizona Law is also working to expand online degree opportunities for international law students. Join us to learn more about Arizona Law’s global legal education and hear from our Global Law Partners and
students.
2:15 - 3:45 P.M.
Arizona Ballroom Salon 11
Concurrent Session 3F
Moderator: Laura Provencher, International Risk Analyst, The University of Arizona, USA
Higher Risk Travel
Language of Presentation: English
Laura Provencher, International Risk Analyst, Office of Global Initiatives, University of Arizona, USA
Jill Calderon, Program Director for Latin American Project Development, Department of Study Abroad, The University of Arizona, USA
Dale LaFleur, Director of Institutional Relations, University of Arizona, USA
Julienne Lottering, Safety Abroad Advisor, University of Toronto, CANADA
Recognizing that all travel involves risk, the University of Arizona (UA) and University of Toronto created processes to facilitate high risk travel. Each
process involves assessing the risks to each traveler and preparing them for each destination. Rather than automatically canceling programs or travel
this nuanced process allows universities with high risk tolerance to individually consider travel to higher risk destinations. This session will share the
development of systems at two universities and what is involved in their travel reviews.
2:15 - 3:45 P.M.
Arizona Ballroom Salon 12
Concurrent Session 3G
Moderator: David Vassar, Senior Assistant to the President, Rice University, USA
The Puentes Consortium
Language of Presentation: English
David Vassar, Senior Assistant to the President, Rice University, USA
Jill DeZapien, Associate Dean for Community Programs, College of Public Health, The University of Arizona, USA
Made up of five universities from Mexico and the United States, The Puentes Consortium provides a distinctive voice for the bi-national community of
scholars who carry out multidisciplinary research on issues of importance to the relations between Mexico and the U.S. and to the well-being of their
inhabitants.
3:45 - 4:00 P.M.
Exhibitor’s Lobby
Refreshment Break
Page 20
4:00 - 5:30 P.M.
Arizona Ballroom
Plenary Session III “Supporting Regional Engagement through Innovative International Partnerships”
Facilitator: Héctor Castellanos, Director of Training for Rural Development, Secretaría de Agricultura, Ganadería, Recursos Naturales, Pesca y Alimentación (SAGARPA), Gobierno de la República Mexicana, MEXICO
Presenters:
Liliana Aguirre, Producer, Mi Ranchito Bananas, MEXICO
Jorge Galo Medina Torres, Director General of Rural Capacity Development and Extension, Secretaría de Agricultura, Ganadería, Recursos Naturales,
Pesca y Alimentación (SAGARPA), Gobierno de la República Mexicana, MEXICO
Ligia Noemí Osorno Magaña, Director General, Instituto Nacional para el Desarrollo de Capacidades del Sector Rural (INCA), MEXICO
5:30 - 6:30 P.M.
JW Marriott Primo Entrance
Break and Bus Transportation to The University of Arizona
6:30 – 8:30 P.M.
Thursday, October 9
The University of Arizona, Student Union, North Ballroom
Awards Dinner
8:30 - 9:00 P.M.
Bus Transportation to JW Marriott Starr Pass
Page 21
6:00 A.M. – 7:00 A.M.
Meet in Lobby
Guided hike in Tucson Mountain Park (Optional - offered by JW Marriott StarrPass)
8:00 A.M. - 9:30 A.M.
Arizona Registration Desk
Information and Registration for CONAHEC and SONA
8:00 A.M. - 9:15 A.M.
Arizona Ballroom
CONAHEC Information Session Breakfast (Open to all Conference Registrants)
Sean Manley-Casimir, Executive Director, CONAHEC
Justin Dutram, Mobility Coordinator, CONAHEC
Marianna Velazquez, Membership Coordinator, CONAHEC
Randy Burd, Assistant Vice President for Program Innovation, Office of Global Initiatives, University of Arizona, USA
Ash Scheder-Black, Director of Information Technology, Office of Global Initiatives, University of Arizona, USA
Grab a plate and join us to chat about current CONAHEC programs and services and exciting new opportunities!
8:00 - 9:15 A.M.
Exhibitor’s Lobby
Buffet Breakfast (Open to all Conference Registrants - seating available in Arizona Ballroom)
9:15 - 10:45 A.M.
Arizona Ballroom
Concurrent Session 4A
Moderator: Dr. Lorrie Clemo, Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs, State University of New York at Oswego, USA
Higher Education International Partnership for Prosperity: A Sustainable Collaboration between the U.S. and
Costa Rica
Friday, October 10
Language of Presentation: English
Dr. Lorrie Clemo, Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs, State University of New York at Oswego, USA
Efstathios Kefallonitis, Associate Professor of Business Administration, State University of New York at Oswego, USA
We describe an innovative collaboration among higher education, government, and employers that offers a model for building skills and promoting
innovative economy across international borders. With strong forces impacting higher education and the economy, we actively built an education
abroad partnership that is both relevant and leading for the 21st century. The SUNY Oswego-Costa Rican Business Program brought together leaders
from higher education, government and the business community to improve student skills and to increase the participating countries competitiveness. Built upon our sector strengths, the student mobility project included a three-part strategic vision for higher education, business and government that has potential to be scaled for greater impact: 1. Align academic offerings with workforce needs where businesses take a direct role in
helping train students through course activities. 2. Foster an ecosystem of global competency where businesses and government partner with higher
education to co-create an innovation agenda. 3. Form synergies to optimize intellectual assets and leverage economic development strategy to reach
new levels of prosperity. These three efforts have a single unifying theme: prosperity through collaboration.
9:15 - 10:45 A.M.
Arizona Ballroom Salon 5
Concurrent Session 4B
Moderator: Beatriz Vera-López, Professor of English as a Foreign Language, Facultad de Estudios Superiores Zaragoza, MEXICO
Interpretation and Translation Training Programs are Key to Global Collaboration: The University of Arizona’s
Model Approach
Language of Presentation: English
Paul Gatto, Assistant Director, National Center for Interpretation, University of Arizona, USA
There can be no collaboration without robust communication. This is especially true across borders. Linguistic and cultural differences can enrich the
human experience, but if they are not bridged effectively they are barriers to justice, education, commerce, healthcare, and other major societal institutions. Too often, efforts to bridge the gap between two languages and cultures are ad hoc, piecemeal, and begun too late, if they are undertaken at
all. Increasingly, however, the need to provide language services through highly qualified interpreters and translators is being recognized. It is the task
of institutes of higher education to meet this need. The University of Arizona’s National Center for Interpretation has several interrelated interpreting
and translating programs which develop these skills at the secondary, postsecondary, and professional levels. These programs introduce and develop
practical, real-world knowledge and skills necessary to close the linguistic and cultural divides. We will discuss the University of Arizona’s specific secondary, postsecondary and professional programs, as well as ways in which they can be used as tools or models by other individuals and institutions.
Page 22
Interdisciplinary Communication: Intercultural and Interlinguistic Challenges
Language of Presentation: Spanish
Beatriz Vera-López, Professor of English as a Foreign Language, Facultad de Estudios Superiores Zaragoza, MEXICO
Interdisciplinary communication issues are akin to those in intercultural communication, more evident in collaborations where some of the partners
use a learned international language such as English. This presentation will discuss the implementation of intercultural communication strategies
to ease the difficulty of interdisciplinary collaboration faced to the increasing specialization in fields. I illustrate my presentation with the results of
an action research project carried out in a ten-week workshop of English abstracts writing attended by Spanish speaking professors and graduate
students of the Facultad de Estudios Superiores Zaragoza, UNAM. The participants were from different disciplines (psychology, psychiatry, education,
chemistry, chemical engineering, biology and public health). At the end, the participants reached interesting conclusions regarding the relationship
between content, language and disciplinary cultures in national and international perspectives.
CPR Guides and Electric Therapy in Indigenous Languages
Language of Presentation: Spanish
Luis Manuel Espinosa Castillo, Coordinator of the Technical College/University Program in Emergency, Occupational Safety, and Rescue and Chief of
the laboratory of Cardiology, Universidad de Guadalajara, MEXICO
80% of sudden deaths are due to cardiac events and approximately 12.5% of natural deaths are sudden, which means that by the year 2020, cardiovascular pathology will continue to be the main cause of death in developed countries and the third most common cause of death in developing
countries. Statistics differ by population segment; in Mexico the population that speaks an aboriginal language has increased to more than 6,695,228
inhabitants. Mortality rates among the population that speaks an aboriginal language are very high, and the third leading source of deaths is cardiovascular. For this reason it is very important that the aboriginal language speaking population remain informed of the principal cardiovascular causes
of death, have a basic understanding of Cardio-Pulmonary Resuscitation, and know how to respond to a sudden cardiac arrest with ventricular fibrillation by means of an automatic external defibrillator. There is an urgent need to establish support for resuscitation or cardiopulmonary resuscitation
with electrical therapy in Mexico and territories inhabited mainly by aboriginal peoples.
9:15 - 10:45 A.M.
Salon 8
Concurrent Session 4C
Moderator: Imelda Olague-Caballero, Researcher, New Mexico State University, USA
Meeting the Challenges of Students Mobility: A Dual Aerospace Engineering Bachelor’s Degree Program Across
Borders
Language of Presentation: English
Internationalize Your Curriculum for Free
Language of Presentation: English
Doniphane Meslier, Marketing/International Coordinator, Business Administration, Universidad Simón Bolívar, COLOMBIA
Internationalize your curriculum for free: 1. Implementation of “mirror-classes“ with our international partners 2. Use of MOOCs’ technology to internationalize the curriculum 3. Creation of an academic network to share international conferences.
Page 23
Friday, October 10
Imelda Olague-Caballero, Researcher, Industrial Engineering, New Mexico State University, USA
Javier Gonzales-Cantu, Academic Secretary, College of Engineering, Universidad Autónoma de Chihuahua, MEXICO
Ricardo Torres-Knight, Dean of Engineering, Universidad Autónoma de Chihuahua, MEXICO
This presentation will discuss the establishment, articulation, and progress of a pioneering academic partnership directed at offering a dual degree
program in the field of Aerospace Engineering. The goal was to design an innovative educational model for international academic collaboration
where student mobility, curriculum development and credit transfer were successfully implemented. We will describe the academic program structure, operating principles and administrative procedures supporting the program as well as the student selection process, enrollment requirements
and challenges faced by students, e.g., language barriers, uneven academic preparedness, culture shock and adaptation, housing, timing of student
visa request process, and other financial difficulties. An assessment of the program’s strengths and weaknesses along with an overview of the results
of its recent accreditation process are also presented. Program outcomes reveal that efforts undertaken by the institutions committed to this partnership have truly contributed to the education of a new type of engineer able to compete in a highly globalized working environment. It is expected
than in the near future, US students will be motivated to start their college careers in Mexico as part of this program.
9:15 - 10:45 A.M.
Salon 9
Concurrent Session 4D
Moderator: Dr. Lorenzo González Kipper, Director, Centro de Desarrollo Comunitario La Salle, Universidad La Salle Noroeste, MEXICO
ULSA Noroeste’s “Centro de Desarrollo Comunitario La Salle”
Language of Presentation: Spanish
Dr. Lorenzo Gonzalez Kipper, Director, La Salle Center for Community Development, Universidad la Salle Noroeste, MEXICO
At CDC La Salle, ULSA’s students and other institution’s volunteers share their talents and their knowledge to promote self-growth, an improved quality of life and a more involved society seeking common good in the Yaqui Community of Cocorit. We support this community by offering a variety of
programs developed to promote men and women’s right to have a job and to provide for their families while creating wellbeing for the entire community. Programs: -Tutoring adults for them to complete primary and middle school with official validation. -Organizing workshops in a wide range of
activities: sports, arts and crafts, sewing, hairstyling, cooking, music, English and computers . -“Hope Mission” where ULSA’s students and teachers
volunteer in their area of expertise, such as: - Professional counseling (financial, legal or psycho educative) - A development project in architecture,
by getting families involved in building their own sustainable adobe houses - A nutrition center promoting healthy eating habits - A legal campaign to
correct irregularities in birth certificates. -“Yaqui Mission” promotes year round evangelizing activities for underprivileged children and their families.
-Library and computer lab services.
Advance and Grow, but Never Forget the Basics
Language of Presentation: Spanish
Allan Alexander Amador Cervantes, President, Universidad Tecnológica de La Paz, MEXICO
Kenno Aleen Amador Cervantes, Director, Universidad Tecnológica de La Paz, MEXICO
This presentation is a reflection about basics that must never be forgotten during the growth and maturation of the University. Rectors who are
university founders have very important and valuable knowledge that must be rescued by rectors who assume the responsibility at institutions with a
long trajectory. Balance must be maintained by keeping what is important while adding through time.
9:15 - 10:45 A.M.
Arizona Ballroom Salon 10
Concurrent Session 4E
Moderator: José Lever, Director, Mexico Office, The University of Arizona, USA
UPAEP Graduate Studies, Higher Education International Collaboration Strategic Model
Language of Presentation: English
Friday, October 10
Elizabeth Vazquez Quitl, Director, Posgrados UPAEP, Universidad Popular Autónoma del Estado de Puebla, MEXICO
Martha Alejandra Cabañas Villa, Coordinator, Graduate College, Universidad Popular Autónoma del Estado de Puebla, MEXICO
Today collaboration has become a core element in the creation of successful research, development, innovation and outreach relationships between
universities and their surroundings. Evidence of this is the Posgrados UPAEP (UPAEP Graduate Programs) model, which, distinguished by academic
excellence and fashioned over time, has converted itself into a successful example of good practices in international higher education collaboration.
UPAEP Graduate Programs has a clear understanding that education is not limited by a local or regional environment, but instead exceeds physical limitations, breaking boundaries and bringing different actors in the educational process ever closer. Professors and students have found ample
potential for the development of dual UPAEP Graduate Programs with universities like Oklahoma State University, Purdue University, The University
of Tennessee, IEMI - Institute Européen du Management International, Universidad de Málaga and Universitat Rovira i Virgili, among others. An international experience is possible thanks to exchange agreements, faculty led programs and international research visits that Posgrados UPAEP have
created and disseminated on a large scale at an accelerated pace with a growing number of collaborators at a global level.
New Trends and Models for Academic and Scientific Collaboration
Language of Presentation: Spanish
Claudia González-Brambila, Professor, Business Administration, ITAM, MEXICO
José Lever, Coordinator, Mexico Office, The University of Arizona, USA
Silvia González-Brambila, Professor, UAM-Azcapotzalco, MEXICO
This session will consist of three presentations related to academic and scientific cooperation. The first will show Mexican scientific cooperation with
researchers from the rest of the world. The second will discuss the new model of academic and scientific cooperation of the University of Arizona
with Mexico. Finally, the third will demonstrate an analysis of academic exchange of engineering students of the Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana-Azcapotzalco.
10:45 - 11:00 A.M.
Exhibitor’s Lobby
Refreshment Break
Page 24
11:00 A.M. - 12:30 P.M.
Arizona Ballroom
Plenary Session IV “The Next 20 Years: Perspectives on the Future of Higher Education Collaboration in North
America and the World”
Facilitator: David Longanecker, President of the CONAHEC Board of Directors and President of the Western Interstate Commission for Higher
Education (WICHE), USA
Presenters:
Raúl Arias, Former President of Universidad Veracruzana (Mexico), Former President of the Interamerican Organization for Higher Education (IOHE)
and Executive Director of CAMPUS – IOHE, ECUADOR
John E. Fowler, Assistant Director, SUNY Center for Collaborative Online International Learning (COIL Center), USA
Sharon Hobenshield, Director, Aboriginal Education & Engagement, Vancouver Island University, CANADA
Maurits Van Rooijen, President, Compostela Group of Universities, SPAIN
12:30 - 1:00 P.M.
Arizona Ballroom
Closing Remarks “A Renewed Working Agenda North American Higher Education Collaboration”
Introduction:
Ricardo Pineda, Consul General of Mexico in Tucson, Secretaría de Relaciones Exteriores, Gobierno de la República Mexicana, MEXICO
Presenter:
Francisco Marmolejo, Head of Tertiary Education, The World Bank, USA
5:30 P.M. - 6:00 P.M.
Saturday, October 11, 2014
8:45 A.M. - 12:00 P.M.
JW Marriott Tucson Starr Pass Resort & Spa Lobby
Post-Conference Networking Visit to the Biosphere 2
Host: TBD
Departure time: 9:00 AM
Cost: $80 (Includes transportation & lunch - pre-purchase tickets at Arizona Ballroom Registration Desk)
Biosphere 2 is located north of Tucson, Arizona at the base of the stunning Santa Catalina Mountains. This one-of-a-kind
University of Arizona owned and operated research facility sits on a ridge at a cool elevation of nearly 4000 feet and is
surrounded by a magnificent natural desert preserve. Here real-time research on the future of our planet unfolds in this
specially designed mini-world containing multiple eco-systems which mimic those of the outside world. Time Life Books
recently named Biosphere 2 one of the 50 must see “Wonders of the World.” We hope you’ll take advantage of this opportunity!
Page 25
Saturday, October 11
Salud Terrace
The Legend of Arriba Abajo Tequila Toast
CONAHEC Board of Directors
Denise Amyot, President, Association of Canadian Community Colleges (ACCC), CANADA
David Atkinson, Vice President of the CONAHEC Board of Directors and President, MacEwan University, CANADA
Mary Ayala, Dean of the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, Eastern New Mexico University, USA
Emilio J. Baños Ardavín, Rector, Universidad Popular Autónoma del Estado de Puebla, MEXICO
Gail Bowkett, Director of International Relations, Association of Universities and
Colleges of Canada (AUCC), CANADA
Walter Bumphus, President & CEO, American Association of Community Colleges (AACC), USA
José Alfonso Esparza Ortiz, Rector, Benemérita Universidad Autónoma de Puebla, MEXICO
Enrique Fernández Fassnacht, Executive Secretary General, Asociación Nacional de Universidades
e Instituciones de Educación Superior (ANUIES), MEXICO
Jocelyne Gacel, President, Asociación Mexicana para la Educación Internacional (AMPEI), MEXICO
Leslie Hendricks, President, Asociación Nacional de Universidades Tecnológicas (ANUT), MEXICO
Tomas Jiménez, Executive Director of the President’s Office, Inter American University of Puerto Rico, USA
Joan Landeros, Director of the Center for International Education, Universidad La Salle, MEXICO
Fernando León-García, Vice-President of the CONAHEC Board of Directors and President, CETYS University, MEXICO
David Longanecker, President of the CONAHEC Board of Directors and President, Western Interstate
Commision for Higher Education (WICHE), USA
Sean Manley-Casimir, Executive Director, CONAHEC
Patti McGill Peterson, Advisor to the President on Global Engagement, American Council on Education (ACE), USA
Mike Proctor, Vice President of Global Initiatives, University of Arizona, USA
Lorna Smith, Director of International Education, Mount Royal University, CANADA
Paule Têtu, Associate to the Vice President Research and Innovation, Université Laval, CANADA
Sylvie Thériault, General Director, Cégep International, CANADA
Marianna Velazquez, Chair, Student Organization of North America (SONA)
Jun Young Kim, President, Sungkyunkwan University, KOREA
Page 26
Información General de Conferencia
Conferencia de SONA
CONAHEC se complace en la oportunidad de convocar su
conferencia junto con la 11aba Conferencia de la Organización de Estudiantes de América del Norte (SONA)
llegan preguntas en un idioma que no es entendido por
todos los participantes, el moderador, uno de los oradores
o cualquier persona de del público puede actuar como
intermediario.
Idiomas
Interpretación
Las presentaciones durante la conferencia se realizarán en
inglés y español. Nuestra principal inquietud es no sólo una
comunicación clara, sino también la máxima interacción de
los participantes y oradores de diferentes idiomas. Invitamos a los participantes a expresarse en el idioma en que se
sientan más cómodos, siempre y cuando se pueda entender
directa o indirectamente por el resto de la audiencia. Si
Interpretación simultánea inglés-español será
proporcionada en las sesiones según lo indicado
por el símbolo visible a la izquierda. Interpretación simultánea francés no estará disponible. Pedimos
disculpas por las molestias que esto puede ocasionar. Se
cobrará USD 100 por cada equipo extraviado, así que, ¡por
favor cuide su dispositivo!
Page 27
Miércoles, 8 de octubre
Martes, 7 de octubre del 2014
4:00 – 6:00 PM
Arizona Registration Desk
Información y registro para CONAHEC y SONA
Miércoles, 8 de octubre del 2014
6:00 A.M. - 7:00 A.M.
Punto de reunión en el lobby del hotel
Caminata guiada en Tucson Mountain Park (opcional – ofrecida por el JW Marriott StarrPass)
8:00 A.M. - 6:00 P.M.
Arizona Registration Desk
Información y registro para CONAHEC y SONA
8:00 A.M. - 1:00 P.M.
San Pedro 1 y 2
Reunión del Consejo Directivo del CONAHEC (Reunión Privada)
8:45 A.M. - 12:00 P.M.
JW Marriott Tucson Starr Pass Hotel Lobby
Visita de Pre-conferencia a la Biósfera 2
Acompañante: Hassan Hijazi
Hora de salida: 9:00 AM
Costo: $80 (Incluye comida y transporte - compre con anticipación su boleto en la mesa de registro afuera del Salón Arizona Ballroom)
La Biósfera 2 está situada al norte de Tucson, Arizona en la base de las impresionantes montañas de Santa Catalina. Esta instalación única para la investigación en la Universidad de Arizona se asienta sobre una cresta en una elevación de casi 4000
pies rodeada de una magnífica reserva natural del desierto. Investigación sobre el futuro de nuestro planeta se desarrolla
aquí en tiempo real en estos ecosistemas especialmente diseñados. Time Life Books recientemente identificó a la Biósfera 2
entre las 50 maravillas del mundo que se tienen que visitar. Esperamos que tome ventaja de esta gran oportunidad.
9:00 A.M. - 12:00 P.M.
JW Marriott Tucson Starr Pass Hotel Lobby
Visita de Pre-conferencia al Laboratorio de los Espejos
Acompañante: Donella Ly
Hora de salida: 9:15 AM
Costo: $30 (Incluye al transporte - compre con anticipación su boleto en la mesa de registro afuera del Salón Arizona Ballroom)
Desde 1980 en el Steward Observatory laboratorio de espejos de la Universidad de Arizona, los ingenieros y científicos han
estado fabricando unos espejos gigantes, ligeros y de un poder sin precedente para la nueva generación de telescopios
infrarrojos y ópticos. Los espejos producidos aquí se utilizan en la mayoría de los telescopios a nivel mundial. Visite este
laboratorio de clase mundial para conocer en donde la hipermetropía de la ciencia se aclara.
Page 28
Arizona Ballroom
Inauguración y bienvenida
Presídium:
David Atkinson, Vice-Presidente del Consejo Directivo del CONAHEC y Rector de MacEwan University, CANADÁ
Fernando León-García, Vice Presidente del Consejo Directivo del CONAHEC y Rector of CETYS University, MÉXICO
David Longanecker, Presidente del Consejo Directivo del CONAHEC y Presidente de la Western Interstate Commission for Higher Education (WICHE),
EEUU
Sean Manley-Casimir, Director Ejecutivo, CONAHEC
Fernando Serrano Migallón, Subsecretario para la Educación Superior, Secretaría de Educación Pública, Gobierno de la República Mexicana, MÉXICO
Ricardo Pineda, Cónsul General de México en Tucson, Secretaría de Relaciones Exteriores, Gobierno de la República Mexicana, MÉXICO
Christopher Teal, Cónsul General de los EEUU en Nogales
Mike Proctor, Vicerrector para iniciativas globales, The University of Arizona, EEUU
Jonathan Rothschild, Alcalde, Ciudad de Tucson
Andrew Comrie, Vicerrector para Asuntos Académicos, The University of Arizona, EEUU
Lorna Smith, Directora de Educación Internacional, Mount Royal University, CANADÁ
2:30 - 3:00 P.M.
Área de exhibiciones
Receso para café
3:00 - 4:30 P.M.
Arizona Ballroom
Sesión Plenaria I “Navegando paradigmas cambiantes en la colaboración de la educación superior en América
del Norte”
Facilitador: Fernando León-García, Vice Presidente del Consejo Directivo del CONAHEC y Rector, CETYS Universidad, MÉXICO
Ponentes:
Gail Bowkett, Directora de Investigación y Relaciones Internacionales, Association of Universities y Colleges of Canada (AUCC), CANADÁ
Guillermo Hernández-Duque, Director General de Vinculación Estratégica, Asociación Nacional de Universidades e Instituciones de Educación Superior (ANUIES), MÉXICO
Patti McGill Peterson, Asesora en Iniciativas Globales, American Council on Education (ACE), EEUU
4:30 – 4:50 P.M.
Arizona Ballroom
¡Vamos a Guadalajara!
Invitación a formar parte de la “Misión a Guadalajara”, ofrecida por el Grupo de Educación Jalisco y la Secretaría de Educación Pública del Estado de
Jalisco como parte de la Incubadora de Movilidad del CONAHEC.
Page 29
Miércoles, 8 de octubre
1:00 - 2:30 P.M.
Miércoles, 8 de octubre
4:50 - 5:00 P.M.
Arizona Ballroom
Invitación de QS Asia
Ponente:
Mandy Mok, CEO, Quacquarelli Symonds Asia, SINGAPORE
5:00 - 5:30 P.M.
JW Marriott Primo Entrance
Traslado en autobús a The University of Arizona Stadium Club
5:30 - 7:30 P.M.
The University of Arizona Stadium Club
Recepción de bienvenida ofrecida por The University of Arizona
7:30 - 8:00 P.M.
Traslado en autobús al JW Marriott Starr Pass
Page 30
6:00 A.M. – 7:00 A.M.
Punto de reunión en el lobby del hotel
Caminata guiada en Tucson Mountain Park (opcional – ofrecida por el JW Marriott StarrPass)
7:00 A.M. - 3:00 P.M.
Arizona Registration Desk
Información y registro para CONAHEC y SONA
7:00 - 8:00 A.M.
Área de exhibiciones
Desayuno Continental (Abierto a todos los participantes de la conferencia)
8:00 - 9:30 A.M.
Arizona Ballroom Sesión Concurrente 1A
UT BIS, el modelo Bilingüe, Internacional y Sustentable de las Universidades Tecnológicas
Idioma de la presentación: Inglés
Elva Patricia Saracho, Directora, Universidad Tecnológica El Retoño, MÉXICO
Luis Felipe Alvarez, Director, Universidad Tecnológica de Saltillo, MÉXICO
Jesús Román, Coordinador, Departamento de Idiomas, Universidad Tecnológica El Retoño, MÉXICO
Proporcionando una percepción de una innovadora modalidad de la educación pública en México, que es totalmente bilingüe e internacional ofrecida
por Universidades Tecnológicas operando en diferentes estados del país, este modelo vanguardista de educación superior en México es único en América Latina y opera bajo un esquema pedagógico inglés-español. Los cursos en estas instituciones son ofrecidos en su mayoría en inglés por personal
docente calificado y certificado. Esta presentación introducirá la historia de este innovador concepto. Se explicarán las estrategias seguidas para hacer
que los estudiantes de estas Universidades Tecnológicas sean verdaderamente bilingües y con una visión internacional. Se discutirán los detalles de los
acuerdos de movilidad estudiantil y docente firmados con otros institutos de educación en el extranjero para apoyar, fomentar y fortalecer el ámbito
internacional de estas instituciones. Esta presentación está dirigida a personal administrativo y docente, agencias gubernamentales y representantes
de asociaciones u otros de instituciones similares.
Internacionalización: Tendencias en la enseñanza y capacitación del lenguaje inglés
Idioma de la presentación: Inglés
Suzanne Panferov, Directora, Centro de Inglés como Segundo Idioma, The University of Arizona, EEUU
Linda Chu, Director Asistente de Programas Globales, Centro de Inglés como Segundo Idioma, The University of Arizona, EEUU
Los métodos y sistemas que utilizamos para aprender y enseñar el lenguaje inglés están cambiando contantemente. La idea del salón de clases se
ha extendido para incluir innumerables formas de ofrecer contenido. El estudiante tradicional también ha cambiado. Hay una demanda creciente de
cursos para la enseñanza del inglés. Para estar actualizados, no podemos ignorar la utilización de nueva tecnología. Cuando se trata de la educación de
un lenguaje, necesitamos explorar maneras de pensar fuera de los esquemas establecidos. Los presentadores discutirán tendencias actuales y futuras
en el campo de la capacitación y enseñanza del idioma inglés. Se incluirán aspectos relacionados con la movilidad estudiantil y docente, los métodos
no-tradicionales de ofrecer cursos, Inglés para Propósitos Específicos (ESP por sus siglas en inglés) y administración del programa. La demanda para
internacionalizar nuestros planteles ha llevado a la necesidad del mejoramiento en habilidades del idioma inglés y metodologías de enseñanza de
profesores de área. La presentación hablará sobre capacitación de maestros utilizando cursos en línea y cursos híbridos utilizando una combinación
presencial y en línea. Los presentadores discutirán tendencias en las solicitudes de material ESP, y el proceso para convertir las peticiones en cursos
concretos y realizables.
8:00 - 9:30 A.M.
Arizona Ballroom Salón 5
Sesión Concurrente 1B
Moderadora: Adriela Fernández, Directora de Programas Latinoamericanos, Purdue University, EEUU
Hacia un modelo norteamericano de colaboración internacional, bilingüe y tecnológicamente intensivo
Idioma de la presentación: Inglés
Adriela Fernandez, Directora de Programas Latinoamericanos, Purdue University, EEUU
Renee Valentina Lopez-Fernández, Instructor, ITESM Mexico City, MÉXICO
Esta presentación propone para el área del CONAHEC, una de las más innovadoras colaboraciones internacionales desarrolladas en las Américas: una
clase tecnológicamente intensiva, bilingüe, impartida conjuntamente por tres instituciones (2 universidades mexicanas o canadienses y una universidad estadounidense). Abordando uno de los más apremiantes problemas de nuestro tiempo es este curso sobre Seguridad Alimenticia y Desarrollo
Sustentable. En todo momento, tendrá dos grupos de estudiantes en el salón de clases: un grupo estadounidense y un grupo mexicano o canadiense
más sus instructores mientras están conectados con la tercer institución por medio de una videoconferencia. Los estudiantes y profesores deben trabajar una semana en cada campus. Recomendamos soluciones innovadoras para el rigor académico, cultural, lingüístico y competencias tecnológicas
Page 31
Jueves, 9 de octubre
Moderadora: Suzanne Panferov, Directora, Centro para el Inglés como Segundo Idioma, The University of Arizona, EEUU
necesarias para los estudiantes del siglo XXI. Este modelo es especialmente adecuado para el área de América del Norte con la posibilidad de tres
instituciones y dos idiomas o tres instituciones y tres idiomas. El componente de trabajar en equipo donde los estudiantes deben presentar un trabajo
multimedia en grupo en un idioma o idiomas de su elección, además de un trabajo de investigación individual, aseguran la conexión real entre estudiantes y contribuciones de alta calidad.
El rol de la colaboración informal y la transferencia de tecnología entre instituciones de educación superior y
pequeñas y medianas empresas (PYMEs), un caso internacional
Idioma de la presentación: Español
Juan Manuel Salinas Escandón, Grupo Disciplinar de Tecnologías de información, Facultad de Comercio, Administración y Ciencias Sociales, Universidad Autónoma de Tamaulipas, MÉXICO
Este estudio cualitativo y experimental está enfocado a descubrir y entender la tendencia, características, expectativas académicas, y tipo de colaboración en el área de tecnologías de información que han sido transferidas informalmente del profesorado en universidades públicas locales a pequeñas
y medianas empresas (PYMEs) en Nuevo Laredo, Tamaulipas, México y Laredo, Texas, EEUU. El propósito de esta investigación es describir las características y entender las razones de los maestros que participan en este tipo de colaboración informal en transferencia de tecnología de información
en las PYMEs regionales.
Exportando la Educación Farmacéutica
Jueves, 9 de octubre
Idioma de la presentación: Inglés
Terry Urbine, Profesor, Ciencias y Prácticas Farmacéuticas, College of Pharmacy, The University of Arizona, EEUU
El objetivo de este proyecto es determinar el tamaño del mercado internacional, demanda y el valor de la educación de posgrado y capacitación originada en los EEUU para farmacéuticos en México, Canadá y más allá. Se evaluarán las barreras de los idiomas y la rentabilidad del ofrecimiento en línea.
Clases en la University of Arizona en la Facultad de Farmacología se están actualmente convirtiendo en un formato híbrido en línea para ampliar el alcance y reducir los costos. Estos pasos se dieron para permitir la distribución de contenidos y el intercambio con otras universidades de EEUU mediante
economías de escala. Esta lógica puede también aplicarse internacionalmente.
8:00 - 9:30 A.M.
Arizona Ballroom Salón 8
Sesión Concurrente 1C
Moderadora: Nadia Mireles, Jefe de la Oficina de Cooperación e Internacionalización, Universidad de Guadalajara, MÉXICO
Hacia la internacionalización: Una perspectiva del sur
Idioma de la presentación: Inglés
Juan Luis Mérega, Subsecretario de Relaciones Institucionales, Universidad Nacional de Quilmes, ARGENTINA
Las políticas de internacionalización son la respuesta de las universidades a un mundo que es cada vez más global y basado en el conocimiento. Pero
el concepto de internacionalización incluye múltiples interpretaciones y preguntas. ¿Debemos considerar la educación como un derecho humano o
la educación como mercancía? ¿Debemos hacer una elección entre cooperación internacional y competencia internacional? ¿Qué es más importante,
movilidad internacional o internacionalización en casa? Estas preguntas deberían ser contestadas por universidades de países en vías de desarrollo, al
mismo tiempo que enfrentan un reto cuando deciden interactuar con universidades de todo el mundo. Es necesario tomar decisiones institucionales a
fin de definir políticas apropiadas, las cuales podrían permitir una amplia cobertura de acceso a una educación de calidad y a los programas internacionales. El objetivo principal deberá ser, educar a los ciudadanos y profesionistas que sean capaces de interactuar en un mundo global, sino que también
puedan ayudar en el desarrollo de sus países. La internacionalización es instrumento clave para este logro.
Nuevas estrategias para prácticas tradicionales: La internacionalización en casa utilizando tecnología
Idioma de la presentación: Inglés
Nadia Mireles, Director de la Oficina de Cooperación e Internacionalización, Universidad de Guadalajara, MÉXICO
María Guadalupe Ureña, Responsable del Centro de Idiomas Auto Acceso, Universidad de Guadalajara, South Center, MÉXICO
Esta presentación discute brevemente el nuevo modelo de internacionalización de la Universidad de Guadalajara y la implementación de políticas
enfocadas a la internacionalización en casa, un concepto que asume que la internacionalización debe ir más allá de la movilidad física. El modelo de
internacionalización implementado desde el 2013 en la Universidad de Guadalajara tiene 5 que impactan a toda la institución. Éstas permiten establecer prioridades y criterios de decisión y orientar los esfuerzos de los programas operacionales. Las estrategias se implementan y operan a través de
programas que pueden ser adaptados o generados por cada Centro Universitario de la Red de Universidad de Guadalajara, de acuerdo con sus características y necesidades. Las estrategias ayudan a fortalecer y construir la cultura y el compromiso con la internacionalización, así como el proceso de
integración de las dimensiones internacionales, interculturales, globales y comparativas en las funciones prácticas de la institución. Las cinco estrategias
son: gestión, cultura, idiomas, movilidad e internacionalización en casa.
Desarrollando una universidad de clase mundial: Maximizando el potencial de la comunidad global en el colegio
comunitario
Idioma de la presentación: Inglés
Ricardo Castro-Salazar, Profesor, Departamento de Ciencias Sociales, Pima Community College, EEUU
Hoy en día, los colegios comunitarios preparan un creciente número de estudiantes de los EEUU e internacionales para empresas, industrias y áreas
que se están volviendo cada vez más globalizados. Por ende, la internacionalización representa no sólo una oportunidad, sino una necesidad. Esta
presentación destaca las actuales tendencias demográficas, económicas y educativas y propone un paradigma internacional holístico para el futuro: un
colegio comunitario que desarrolla ciudadanos globales para ámbito mundial, sin dejar de responder a la fuerza laboral y necesidades educativas de la
comunidad local.
Page 32
8:00 - 9:30 A.M.
Arizona Ballroom Salón 9
Sesión Concurrente 1D
Moderadora: Elizabeth Pocock, Abogada Supervisora de Investigación y Coordinadora del Desarrollo, National Law Center for Inter-American Free Trade, EEUU
Creando un modelo para la colaboración internacional y local: Las experiencias del Centro Nacional de Leyes para
el libre comercio inter-americano en Tucson y la Universidad Mayor en Chile
Idioma de la presentación: Inglés
8:00 - 9:30 A.M.
Arizona Ballroom Salón 10
Sesión Concurrente 1E
Moderadora: María Eugenia Bolaños, Coordinadora, Federación de Instituciones Mexicanas Particulares de Educación Superior (FIMPES),
MÉXICO
Movilidad estudiantil mexicana y la aseguración de la calidad
Idioma de la presentación: Inglés
María Eugenia Bolaños, Coordinadora, Sistema de Acreditación, Federación de Instituciones Mexicanas Particulares de Educación Superior (FIMPES),
MÉXICO
La movilidad estudiantil se ha convertido en parte de los esfuerzos de las universidades en México para adoptar la internacionalización. Cada semestre
los estudiantes de instituciones privadas mexicanas viajan a diferentes países en busca de experiencias internacionales. Recientemente, se publicaron
los resultados de un instrumento dándonos una indicación de las tendencias en movilidad de los estudiantes mexicanos. Un aspecto interesante de
los resultados es que la mayoría de los estudiantes que participan en experiencias de movilidad provienen de instituciones privadas, lo que genera
varias preguntas con respecto a la capacidad de las universidades privadas para proporcionar servicios adicionales a los estudiantes, especialmente
teniendo en cuenta el hecho de que no reciben fondos públicos o federales. La acreditación institucional se ha realizado en las universidades privadas
exclusivamente por FIMPES desde 1992. Hasta la fecha, 114 universidades mexicanas están trabajando en sus procesos de acreditación. Los sistemas de
acreditación de la FIMPES incluyen la revisión de la capacidad y la eficacia de las instituciones privadas, según la declaración de la misión de cada una.
Los programas de movilidad forman parte de los esfuerzos de internacionalización de las instituciones acreditadas por FIMPES y se evalúan. Durante
esta presentación se hablará sobre los datos de movilidad estudiantil en las universidades mexicanas FIMPES y su relación con el aseguramiento de la
calidad.
El estado del Proceso de Bolonia y el área de educación superior europea
Idioma de la presentación: Inglés
Kevin Rolwing, Director Asistente, Evaluaciones, World Education Services, EEUU
El “Proceso de Bolonia” es un proceso de reforma universitaria diversa y en continuo desarrollo que se sigue implementando en todo el panorama
europeo y otras partes del mundo. Nuestra sesión examinará la historia, objetivos y estado actual de las reformas y las implicaciones resultantes para
oficiales de admisiones de universidades canadienses, mexicanas y estadounidenses, en particular a la licenciatura de Bolonia de tres años. También
observaremos los objetivos de la internacionalización del Proceso de Bolonia y los logros.
Acreditación Internacional
Idioma de la presentación: Español
Eduardo Ávalos, Presidente del Consejo, Consejo de Acreditación en Ciencias Sociales, Contables y Administrativas en la Educación Superior de Latinoamérica (CACSLA), MÉXICO
La exposición propone reflexionar sobre la educación superior, sus referentes, tendencias y mecanismos de aseguramiento de la calidad educativa en
el contexto internacional. Se presenta el caso particular del Consejo de Acreditación en Ciencias Sociales, Contables y Administrativas en la Educación
Superior de Latinoamérica, CACSLA, cuyo instrumento contempla 12 estándares; así como las conclusiones a las que ha llegado tras su labor evaluativa
y de investigación.
Page 33
Jueves, 9 de octubre
Elizabeth Pocock, Abogado Investigador Supervisor y Coordinador de Desarrollo, National Law Center for Inter-American Free Trade, EEUU
Rodrigo Novoa, Director Ejecutivo de NatLaw Chile, Miembro del Consejo de NatLaw en Tucson, Universidad Mayor, CHILE
Michael Mandig, Miembro del Consejo e Instructor de Capacitación, National Law Center for Inter-American Free Trade, EEUU
El Centro Nacional de Derecho para el Libre Intercambio Comercial Interamericano (NatLaw) es una organización sin fines de lucro de educación e
investigación afiliada con la Facultad de Leyes de la University of Arizona (UA). A través de su colaboración con la UA y sus egresados, NatLaw aborda
diversos retos mundiales y trabaja para promover las mejores prácticas de reformas de ley y proyectos de desarrollo de capacidades en todo el mundo.
Las relaciones que se han establecido por NatLaw con exalumnos y con otros socios de la UA han proporcionado los cimientos para construir proyectos
impactantes de cooperación, no sólo en el ámbito del derecho. En los últimos años, NatLaw se ha asociado con la Universidad Mayor en Chile para crear
un centro hermano en Santiago. Este centro hermano ya se está empezando a involucrar con uno de los proyectos más exitosos capacitando tanto a
jueces como abogados a lo largo de América Latina. Acompañe al equipo de desarrollo de NatLaw y de la Universidad Mayor, junto con otras personas
involucradas en estas colaboraciones, entre ellos, uno de los miembros de la Junta Directiva de NatLaw e instructor de capacitación, para aprender más
acerca de los proyectos hechos posibles por medio de estas relaciones.
8:00 - 9:30 A.M.
Arizona Ballroom Salón 11
Sesión Concurrente 1F
Moderadora: Mónica López Ramírez, Estudiante de Doctorado en el Programa de Sociología, El Colegio de México, MÉXICO
Capacitando profesionistas en el extranjero. Un vistazo a la formación de las élites políticas y científicas
mexicanas
Idioma de la presentación: Inglés
Jueves, 9 de octubre
Mónica López Ramírez, Estudiante de Doctorado en Sociología, El Colegio de México, MÉXICO
María del Rocío Grediaga Kuri, Profesor Investigador, Sociología, Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana, Campus Azcapotzalco, MÉXICO
María Magdalena Fresan Orozco, Profesor Investigador Titular C, Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana, Cuajimalpa Campus, MÉXICO
ROMAC es una red internacional que reúne a investigadores de México y seis países de América del Norte y Europa en temas de estudio y movilidad
académica, formación élite en México y circulación del conocimiento entre los países. Se examinarán y discutirán diferentes aspectos de nuestra investigación en instituciones de educación superior procedentes de seis países desarrollados; Canadá, Estados Unidos, Francia, Alemania, España y el
Reino Unido: a) las razones para estudiar en el extranjero y las experiencias de los mexicanos estudiando programas de posgrado en ingeniería en el
extranjero; b) los cambios en las tendencias en la distribución entre generaciones (1996 a 2013) de los aspirantes del CONACYT y becas entre países y
áreas disciplinarias en los principales destinos académicos; c) donde los miembros del sistema nacional de investigadores (SNI) obtuvieron su maestría
y doctorado y el impacto de diferentes países de estudio en su desarrollo de redes académicas y cooperación internacional; y d) los más altos grados y
lugares de estudio de los funcionarios de gobierno durante el periodo de Calderón y el primer año de Peña Nieto.
8:00 - 9:30 A.M.
Arizona Ballroom Salón 12
Sesión Concurrente 1G
Moderadora: María Eugenia Calderón-Porter, Vicerrectora Asistente, Texas A&M International University, EEUU
Promoviendo el desarrollo internacional colaborando con la industria
Idioma de la presentación: Inglés
José Arroyo, Director de Enlace, CETYS Universidad, MÉXICO
La asociación entre CETYS Universidad (ubicada en Mexicali, México), Honeywell y otras industrias regionales ha propiciado el desarrollo de capacidad
institucional, capacitación de liderazgo, desarrollo de mano de obra e internacionalización, mientras apoya y mejora los esfuerzos de colaboración con
el gobierno. De esta colaboración han surgido iniciativas autosustentables apoyando la ciencia, tecnología, ingeniería y matemáticas (STEM por sus
siglas en inglés) en los niveles de primaria y secundaria, resultando en un aumento en las inscripciones, especialmente en programas de ingeniería.
Combinando información cuantitativa y cualitativa para evaluar el impacto del aprendizaje práctico en la empleabilidad de graduados de ingeniería a través de una colaboración industria-universidad
Idioma de la presentación: Inglés
Imelda Olague-Caballero, Asistente de Investigación, Ingeniería Industrial, New Mexico State University, EEUU
Delia Valles-Rosales, Profesor Asociado, Departamento de Ingeniería Industrial, New Mexico State University, EEUU
Actualmente hay una tendencia en todo el mundo de preparar ingenieros altamente calificados y culturalmente competentes, listos para ser contratados después de graduarse. Sin embargo, los colegios y las universidades están siendo cuestionados acerca de su capacidad para preparar a los ingenieros graduados para satisfacer las expectativas de las empresas. El aprendizaje práctico se ha utilizado para ayudar a remediar esta situación, basado en
su capacidad para fomentar habilidades y aptitudes aprendidas más efectivamente fuera de un currículo formal, específicamente en escenarios reales.
Para comprender las implicaciones que tiene el aprendizaje práctico en la empleabilidad de los graduados de ingeniería, se evaluó una colaboración
universidad-empresa. El objetivo era investigar el impacto que tiene trabajar en escenarios del mundo real en el desarrollo de habilidades sociales,
competencia cultural y creencias de autoeficacia entre los estudiantes que participan en el programa. Este documento presenta un resumen de la
colaboración universidad-empresa y la metodología y las medidas utilizadas para evaluar el programa. La investigación buscó pruebas de que esta
intervención mejoró la empleabilidad de los estudiantes de ingeniería ofreciendo oportunidades de aumentar sus creencias de auto-eficacia mientras
adquieren habilidades sociales y convirtiéndose culturalmente competentes. Los resultados parciales indicaron que el exitoso diseño e implantación
del programa depende del compromiso de las partes interesadas, constante monitoreo de los estudiantes y estrecha comunicación con la industria.
Caso histórico: Desafíos de fuerza laboral Texas Eagle Ford/Burgos Basin International
Idioma de la presentación: Inglés
Maria Eugenia Calderon-Porter, Vicepresidente Asistente, Oficina del Vicerrector de Iniciativas Globales, Texas A&M International University, EEUU
La extensión productiva compuesta por esquistos llamada “International Shale” y conocida como “Eagle Ford and Burgos Basin” han presentado un
nuevo desafío para la comunidad educativa regional. El boom “Texas Shale” ha creado demandas de una fuerza laboral profesional que no se encuentra
fácilmente en las zonas rurales de Texas. Además, las reformas energéticas mexicanas han abierto las puertas a la exploración por inversionistas extranjeros en su región del norte. Idealmente Texas podría participar en el desarrollo del yacimiento petrolífero de la región del norte de México. Esto no es
probable que suceda puesto que los depósitos petrolíferos de Texas tienen suficiente trabajo para mantener ocupados a su escaza fuerza laboral durante
varios años. Texas A&M International University (TAMIU) está cumpliendo con el desafío creando espacios educativos que puedan llevar a estudiantes
universitarios estadounidenses y mexicanos a una fuerza laboral internacional dentro de la industria del petróleo.
9:30 - 9:45 A.M.
Área de exhibiciones
Receso para café
Page 34
9:45 - 11:15 A.M.
Arizona Ballroom
Sesión Concurrente 2A
Moderadora: Laura Provencher, Analista de Riesgos Internacionales, The University of Arizona, EEUU
Reunión del Consejo del Overseas Security Advisory Council (OSAC) – Nogales, México
Idioma de la presentación: Inglés
El “Overseas Security Advisory Council” (OSAC) es un Comité Asesor Federal con un acta gubernamental de los Estados Unidos para promover la
cooperación de la seguridad entre los intereses empresariales estadounidenses y el sector privado a nivel mundial y el Departamento de Estado de los
Estados Unidos. Esta oficina es dirigida por un Consejo Ejecutivo de organizaciones del sector privado y de la Oficina de Seguridad Diplomática, la cual
forma parte del Departamento de Estado de los Estados Unidos. Información sobre una variedad de problemas de seguridad, como la delincuencia, el
terrorismo, los planes de contingencia y seguridad de la información, es compartida a través de correo electrónico, teléfono y consultas en persona en
la oficina.
9:45 - 11:15 A.M.
Arizona Ballroom Salón 5
Sesión Concurrente 2B
Moderadora: Imelda Olague, Asistente de Investigación, New Mexico State University, EEUU
Idioma de la presentación: Inglés
Ricardo Valerdi, Profesor Asociado de Sistemas e Ingeniería Industrial, University of Arizona, EEUU
En esta presentación se describirá un programa de intercambio entre la University of Arizona (UA) y el Instituto Tecnológico y de Estudios Superiores
de Monterrey (ITESM), Campus Sonora, el cual está enfocado en la ingeniería. Específicamente, se describirá un curso personalizado de 3 semanas que
fue diseñado para estudiantes de ingeniería del ITESM interesados en la Carrera de Ingeniería de Sistemas de la UA, el cual se impartió en el verano
de 2014. El objetivo del curso fue que los estudiantes diseñaran robots que jugaran fútbol soccer como una manera de aprender sobre el desarrollo de
productos e ingeniería de sistemas. Las lecciones aprendidas durante el proceso serán compartidas con la intención de mejorar el programa de modo
que pueda repetirse en el futuro.
Avanzando la internacionalización de la educación superior: Lecciones aprendidas de una colaboración entre Estados Unidos y México para desarrollar un programa de doctorado en ingeniería en conjunto
Idioma de la presentación: Inglés
Imelda Olague, Asistente Investigador, Ingeniería Industrial, New Mexico State University, EEUU
Ricardo Torres-Knight, Decano de Ingeniería, Universidad Autónoma de Chihuahua, MÉXICO
Cecilia Olague, Profesor Investigador, Universidad Autónoma de Chihuahua, MÉXICO
Este estudio de caso documenta una iniciativa binacional para ofrecer nuevas perspectivas sobre la internacionalización de la educación superior. El objetivo era afrontar los efectos que la globalización está teniendo en la educación superior y promover la formación de investigadores más competitivos,
capaces de contribuir a la mejora de sus países de origen. El reto consistía en diseñar e implementar estrategias efectivas para compartir responsabilidades de supervisión académica a nivel de doctorado al mismo tiempo que se aborda el tema del desarrollo curricular y la movilidad estudiantil. Durante
esta sesión se proporcionará una visión general del acuerdo, los procedimientos de admisión y los requisitos para la concesión de grado. Actualmente,
dos estudiantes con fechas de graduación estimada en el 2015 y 2016, respectivamente, han sido transferidos de la UACH a NMSU como parte de este
programa, cuyas áreas de especialidad incluyen la ingeniería estructural y geotécnica. El programa fue revisado recientemente mediante un análisis
SWOT (fortalezas, debilidades, oportunidades y peligros) y un Modelo Lógico para identificar áreas de oportunidad y para evaluar la relación entre los
objetivos y los resultados del programa. El impacto de competencia cultural y creencias de auto-eficacia en el desempeño del estudiante también fue
considerado para dar recomendaciones para el mejoramiento del programa.
Page 35
Jueves, 9 de octubre
Utilizando el fútbol soccer para atraer estudiantes interesados en ingeniería
9:45 - 11:15 A.M.
Arizona Ballroom Salón 8
Sesión Concurrente 2C
Moderadora: Toni Griego-Jones, Profesora, The University of Arizona, EEUU
Estudiantes con experiencia educativa previa en los Estados Unidos inscritos en las escuelas de Sonora: Su capital
académico
Idioma de la presentación: Español
Jueves, 9 de octubre
Yamilet Martínez, Estudiante de Doctorado, Departamento de Enseñanza Aprendizaje y Estudios Socioculturales, University of Arizona, MÉXICO
Toni Griego-Jones, Profesora, Departamento de Enseñanza, Aprendizaje y Estudios Socioculturales, The University of Arizona, EEUU
Esta investigación cualitativa identifica características del desarrollo de lenguaje (español e inglés), el desarrollo social y el capital académico de estudiantes con experiencia educativa previa en los Estados Unidos y que ahora están inscritos en las escuelas de Sonora. Estudiantes y padres de familia que
por un periodo de tiempo vivieron en los Estados Unidos dan su testimonio y, junto con el de los profesores se analizan las implicaciones educativas de
esta migración de retorno bajo la perspectiva del transnacionalismo. Se busca volver visibles a estos estudiantes que cada vez adquieren mayor presencia en aulas Sonorenses, a través de la valoración de su capital social y académico y hacer propuestas educativas pertinentes acorde a sus necesidades.
Se reconocen las particularidades propias de la región Sonora-Arizona que permiten, por sus características geográficas, económicas y sociales, generar
un enfoque enriquecido de redes transnacionales en favor del fortalecimiento de la identidad y educación de los niños transnacionales.
Sāpo Nistohtamowin: Comprendiendo nuestras culturas desde las raíces, un programa de colaboración en la Universidad de Saskatchewan entre el Centro de Estudiantes Aborígenes y el Centro de Estudiantes Internacionales y
de Estudios en el Extranjero
Idioma de la presentación: Inglés
Davida Bentham, Oficial de Proyectos Especiales, Centro de Estudiantes y Estudios Internacionales, University of Saskatchewan, CANADÁ
Janelle Pewapsconias, Asistente, Centro de Estudiantes Aborígenes, The University of Saskatchewan, CANADÁ
El Centro de Estudiantes Aborígenes (ASC por sus siglas en inglés) y el Centro de Estudiantes Internacionales y de Estudios en el Extranjero (ISSAC
por sus siglas en inglés) se asociaron en septiembre del 2013 para proporcionar un programa para toda la comunidad universitaria con un enfoque en
las relaciones internacionales y aborígenes y el entendimiento cultural. La misión de este programa es proporcionar un espacio y lugar para aprender
acerca de las culturas indígenas y no-indígenas (la inteligencia cultural), disipar mitos, hacer preguntas y entender con respeto a nuestras diferencias a
través de un lente anti-opresivo, trabajando para la igualdad y justicia social. Esta asociación ha tenido la oportunidad de crear un espacio intercultural
dirigido por estudiantes para participar activamente en el entendimiento y la apreciación cultural.
9:45 - 11:15 A.M.
Arizona Ballroom Salón 9
Sesión Concurrente 2D
Moderadora: Mandy Hansen, Directora de Admisión y Reclutamiento Internacional, Northern Arizona University, EEUU
Explorando la internacionalización efectiva a través de un examinación de interacción estudiantil, iniciativas de
aprendizaje global y género y administración
Idioma de la presentación: Inglés
Dr. Mandy Hansen, Director, Centro de Educación Internacional, Northern Arizona University, EEUU
Angela Miller, Director Asistente, Centro de Educación Internacional, Northern Arizona University, EEUU
Samantha Clifford, Coordinador, Northern Arizona University, EEUU
El panel se tratará de la investigación que ayuda a informar y proporcionar una comprensión más amplia sobre las iniciativas globales de aprendizaje,
la interacción estudiantil, y el género dentro de la administración de la educación internacional. Esta sesión explorará tres proyectos de investigación
dentro del ámbito de la educación internacional. Los temas a tratar incluyen (1) la interacción internacional y nacional estudiantil fomentada a través
del currículo; (2) aprendizaje global para todos; y (3) las mujeres en puestos internacionales de alto rango y sus experiencias con el tema del género.
Se incluirá tiempo de discusión en el panel para que cada ponente hable sobre las lecciones aprendidas, los desafíos y problemas encontrados y cómo
estos se abordaron en el proceso de investigación. El resto de la sesión se centrará en el intercambio de ideas y de información sobre cómo los ponentes
pueden llevar a cabo sus responsabilidades y desarrollar nuevas ideas para la internacionalización en sus instituciones.
9:45 - 11:15 A.M.
Arizona Ballroom Salón 10
Sesión Concurrente 2E
Moderador: Romualdo López, Rector de la Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana, Unidad Azcapotzalco, Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana, MÉXICO
La movilidad estudiantil internacional: La experiencia de la UAM- Unidad Azcapotzalco
Idioma de la presentación: Español
Romualdo López, Rector, Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana, MÉXICO
Eduardo de la Garza, Coordinador General de Desarrollo Académico, Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana, MÉXICO
La movilidad de alumnos en las instituciones de educación superior ha adquirido creciente importancia en los últimos años, principalmente por: 1) la
posibilidad que brinda para, a través del reconocimiento y apoyo mutuo entre las mismas, promover la equidad, el desarrollo del pensamiento crítico y
el fortalecimiento de la capacidad de adaptación para contribuir al bien económico, social y cultural de las comunidades, 2) procurar la dimensión nacional e internacional del conocimiento, y formar profesionales e investigadores con una amplia visión del mundo y una mejor capacidad de adaptación
Page 36
a los cambios y 3) enseñar al alumno a manejar su vida, hacer frente a dificultades y superar retos: es una profunda formación para la vida. El objetivo
de este trabajo es un acercamiento a la experiencia de la UAM - Unidad Azcapotzalco en materia de movilidad estudiantil dentro de los procesos de
internacionalización de la educación superior, expansión de redes científicas y académicas, integración regional y cooperación educativa.
Redes generadoras de comunicación e información, así como de interconexiones culturales: Un análisis para entender los nuevos paradigmas de la Internacionalización de estudiantes de nivel superior
Idioma de la presentación: Español
Kenno Aleen Amador Cervantes, Abogado General, Rectoría, Universidad Tecnológica de La Paz, MÉXICO
Los nuevos sistemas de comunicación permiten que los individuos interactúen y accedan a diversos ambientes sociales, gracias a esto se pueden superar las fronteras geográficas que antes impedían el contacto y se hace posible todo esto, a lo que antes era imposible. Este es uno de los principales
objetivos de esta investigación, que se conducirá sobre una comprensión de la Globalización en los temas ya mencionados. Asumiendo, además, que la
Globalización se refiere a procesos y dimensiones distintas; responde a tendencias históricas seculares con antecedentes identificables; es irregular, es
decir, su impacto en los diversos países es variable, dependiendo de diversas circunstancias, tales como la posición del Estado en el sistema político militar mundial; la posición del Estado en la división internacional del trabajo; la consolidación interna de las instituciones del Estado nación, entre otras.
9:45 - 11:15 A.M.
Arizona Ballroom Salón 11
Sesión Concurrente 2F
Obstáculos Lingüísticos: ¿Cultura o Educación?
Idioma de la presentación: Español
Aurora Bustillo, Maestra de Planeación, Universidad Autónoma de Coahuila, MÉXICO
A lo largo de los años, las instituciones públicas mexicanas han hecho esfuerzos por ampliar las experiencias internacionales. A pesar de
que los resultados han mejorado, el acceso a estas experiencias es aún limitado. Una de las causas es el idioma. Este grupo de docentes
reflexiona acerca del origen: es cultural o es el modelo educativo?
La movilidad estudiantil en la construcción de espacios de paz: El caso de la Universidad Autónoma de Sinaloa
Idioma de la presentación: Español
América Lizárraga González, Directora General de Vinculación y Relaciones Internacionales, Universidad Autónoma de Sinaloa, MÉXICO
La movilidad estudiantil, como una de las estrategias de internacionalización de la educación superior, se plantea como uno de los medios para construir
espacios de paz en el ambiente académico y social. En este sentido, se analiza como estudio de caso el programa de movilidad internacional que se ha
implementado en la Universidad Autónoma de Sinaloa (UAS), y su impacto en la construcción de una cultura de paz.
9:45 - 11:15 A.M.
Arizona Ballroom Salón 12
Sesión Concurrente 2G
Moderadora: Rachel Lindsey, Analista de Políticas, Association of Universities and Colleges of Canada (AUCC), CANADÁ
Hacia una nueva era de cooperación de educación superior Canadá-México
Idioma de la presentación: Inglés
Rachel Lindsey, Analista Político, Relaciones Internacionales, Association of Universities and Colleges of Canada (AUCC), CANADÁ
Guillermo Hernández Duque Delgadillo, Director General de Vinculación Estratégica, Asociación Nacional de Universidades e Instituciones de Educación Superior (ANUIES), MÉXICO
Como representantes respectivos nacionales de las universidades de Canadá y México, la Asociación de Universidades y Colegios de Canadá (AUCC por
sus siglas en inglés) y la Asociación Nacional de Universidades e Instituciones de Educación Superior en México (ANUIES) son los principales interesados en la internacionalización en sus respectivos países. Como tal, tienen un importante papel en crear espacios para el diálogo entre las instituciones
de educación superior de Canadá y México y los responsables políticos encargados de avanzar la relación bilateral de educación superior entre Canadá
y México. Como una demostración de compromiso con esta responsabilidad, en septiembre del 2014, la AUCC, con un fuerte apoyo por parte de la
ANUIES, encabezó una delegación de alto nivel formada por 23 representantes de universidades canadienses para llevarlos a México para participar con
socios institucionales y representantes de gobierno en la Cd. de México y asistir a la reunión internacional anual de la ANUIES, organizada por la Universidad Autónoma de Chiapas. Durante esta visita, las universidades canadienses y mexicanas tendrán la oportunidad de abordar una serie de temas
y objetivos comunes relacionados con la internacionalización a través del intercambio de información, ideas y mejores prácticas, y la identificación
de nuevas oportunidades de colaboración. Esta visita también involucrará a legisladores de Canadá y México y ayudará a informar sobre el diseño de
estrategias de internacionalización a nivel nacional, tales como la estrategia de México para la Estrategia Internacional de Educación que Canadá ha
lanzado recientemente. Acompañe a AUCC y a ANUIES en una sesión informativa sobre la visita de las universidades canadienses en México llevada a
cabo en septiembre y echar un vistazo hacia el futuro de la cooperación en la educación superior entre Canadá y México.
11:15 - 11:30 A.M.
Área de exhibiciones
Receso para café
Page 37
Jueves, 9 de octubre
Moderadora: Aurora Bustillo, Maestra, Universidad Autónoma de Coahuila, MÉXICO
11:30 A.M - 1:00 P.M.
Arizona Ballroom
Sesión Plenaria II “Caminos hacia la internacionalización”
Facilitadora: Suzanne Panferov, Directora, Centro de Inglés como Segundo Idioma, The University of Arizona, EEUU
Ponentes:
Héctor Arreola Soria, Coordinador General de Universidades Tecnológicas y Politécnicas, Secretaría de Educación Pública, Gobierno de la República
Mexicana, MÉXICO
Matt Clausen, Vice Presidente, Partners of the Americas, EEUU
Jorge de la Torre Rosas, Director de Relaciones Institucionales, Santander Universities, EEUU
Martha Navarro, Coordinadora General de Proyecta 100,000 y Directora General Adjunto para la Cooperación Académica, Asociación Mexicana para
la Cooperación y Desarrollo (AMEXCyD), Secretaría de Relaciones Exteriores, Gobierno de la República Mexicana, MÉXICO
1:00 - 2:15 P.M.
Jueves, 9 de octubre
Arizona Ballroom
Comida (Abierto a todos los participantes de la conferencia)
Bienvenida a nuevos miembros del CONAHEC
2:15 - 3:45 P.M.
Arizona Ballroom
Sesión Concurrente 3A
Moderadora: Kris Lou, Directora, Oficina de Educación Internacional; Profesora Asociada, Estudios Internacionales, Willamette University,
EEUU
Desarrollando competencias interculturales y transformación: Variaciones mexicanas y estadounidenses sobre un
modelo común
Idioma de la presentación: Inglés
Kris Lou, Director de Educación Internacional y Profesor Asociado de Estudios Internacionales, Willamette University, EEUU
Gabriele Bosley, Director de Programas Internacionales y Profesor de Idiomas y Culturas Globales, Bellarmine University, EEUU
Thomas Buntru, Director de Programas Internacionales, Universidad de Monterrey (UDEM), MÉXICO
Esta sesión aborda la eficacia de combinar teoría, investigación y diseño de currículo para impartir un curso intercultural (tanto en línea como presencial) que conecta estudiantes de todo el mundo y en nuestros campus en México y en Estados Unidos alrededor de los desafíos interculturales comunes
desde el punto de vista de diversos contextos culturales. Panelistas de tres universidades diferentes (uno de México y dos de Estados Unidos) presentarán sus variaciones sobre un modelo de intervención común que utiliza un instrumento de evaluación empírica como una herramienta de aprendizaje
y un medio para medir el desarrollo intercultural con estudio previo y posterior al intercambio. Los ponentes hablarán de la eficacia del modelo en sus
contextos institucionales específicos, describirán la implementación de cada uno y ofrecerán consejos sobre cómo adoptar y adaptar el modelo a diversas limitaciones y oportunidades de los programas institucionales y de intercambio.
2:15 - 3:45 P.M.
Arizona Ballroom Salón 5
Sesión Concurrente 3B
Moderador: Chester Haskell, Director Asesor, Programas Profesionales Internacionales, University of California – San Diego, EEUU
Cómo las formas internacionales de acreditación facilitan o inhiben la colaboración entre instituciones de educación superior en México y Estados Unidos
Idioma de la presentación: Inglés
Chester Haskell, Director Consultivo, Programas Profesionales Internacionales, University of California - San Diego, EEUU
Existe un gran interés en México (y en otros lugares) en las formas internacionales de acreditación en tanto que las instituciones de educación superior
buscan mejorar la calidad y reputación y crear alianzas con instituciones en Estados Unidos que promuevan la movilidad de estudiantes y graduados.
Sin embargo, la acreditación internacional de instituciones mexicanas es muy limitada. ¿Esto tiene que ser un obstáculo para una mayor colaboración?
¿Cómo pueden mejorar sus oportunidades de alianzas las instituciones mexicanas que no están acreditadas internacionalmente?
Una propuesta de los indicadores de calidad académica en universidades públicas estatales en México
Idioma de la presentación: Inglés
Martín Pantoja, Profesor, Departamento de Iniciativas Empresariales y Administración de Negocios, Universidad de Guanajuato, MÉXICO
Teniendo en cuenta el constante debate sobre el concepto de calidad en el área de educación, en este estudio se analiza el concepto de calidad académica de las instituciones de educación superior a través de los determinantes y dimensiones de la calidad. Debido al auge y alto impacto de rankings internacionales y de políticas federales y programas de educación superior en México en las últimas décadas, las universidades públicas estatales
(UPES) se han visto obligadas a seguir las tendencias y cumplir con los requisitos de indicadores académicos para tener validez ante la sociedad y
garantizar el acceso a los fondos. Para tomar ventaja de este momento y dirigir esfuerzos de las UPES hacia la consolidación de la calidad académica,
Page 38
se llevó a cabo un análisis de los indicadores utilizados por los principales rankings internacionales y los diferentes organismos gubernamentales y
asociaciones universitarias. Se elaboró una propuesta de indicadores de calidad académica aplicables a las UPES en México y los indicadores propuestos
fueron clasificados según su ámbito de correspondencia.
Bases de datos de credenciales educativas de cursos en línea: Combatiendo el fraude y al mismo tiempo
destacando la transparencia y cooperación
Idioma de la presentación: Inglés
Martha Van Devender, Evaluador, Educational Credential Evaluators, EEUU
La creciente percepción del fraude en la documentación de la educación superior ha resultado en algunas novedosas soluciones en línea para responder
a estos problemas. Acompáñenos a una demostración de distintos formatos de bases de datos de credenciales educativas en línea, con resultados que
van desde títulos de diploma a versiones totalmente digitalizadas de la documentación. Aunque los posibles empleadores son los que más se benefician
de estos recursos en línea, estas herramientas pueden ser utilizadas también por profesionales en la educación internacional. Aprenda cómo puede
beneficiarse de estas demostraciones de cooperación y transparencia del gobierno.
2:15 - 3:45 P.M.
Arizona Ballroom Salón 8
Sesión Concurrente 3C
Moderadora: Gabriela Valdez, Coordinadora de Programa, The University of Arizona, EEUU
Idioma de la presentación: Inglés
Gabriela Valdez, Coordinadora del Programa, Eller College of Management, The University of Arizona, EEUU
El número de estudiantes internacionales chinos en los Estados Unidos ha aumentado en los últimos años, especialmente en el área de negocios. Esta
sesión brindará un resumen del programa Eller Global Business Leader (EGBL), un programa exitoso para estudiantes universitarios internacionales
provenientes de China. El principal objetivo del EGBL es crear oportunidades para los estudiantes para adquirir habilidades de comunicación y negocios
necesarios para tener éxito en un programa de pregrado en los negocios en los Estados Unidos y para internacionalizar el ambiente de aprendizaje
universitario. El programa cumple con sus objetivos mediante la incorporación de diferentes actividades culturales, concursos de casos y numerosos
talleres de desarrollo profesional. Asimismo, este programa ayuda a internacionalizar la universidad promoviendo actividades culturales chinas y colaborando con diferentes grupos de estudiantes americanos. El EGBL tuvo una alta tasa de retención durante su primer año en comparación con programas
similares y los estudiantes tuvieron promedios significativamente más altos que los estudiantes de negocios internacionales que no participaron.
Nuestra percepción de “El Mundo”: Diferenciación en definiciones institucionales de la “Clase Mundial”
Idioma de la presentación: Inglés
Russel Potter, Asesor, Colleges of Letters, Arts, and Science, University of Arizona, EEUU
Las universidades en los Estados Unidos se enorgullecen de ser “clase mundial”. Esta presentación muestra un análisis de cómo seis universidades de
investigación de Estados Unidos definen el término “clase mundial” y cómo estas diversas definiciones modelan su visión, misión e identidades institucionales.
2:15 - 3:45 P.M.
Arizona Ballroom Salón 9
Sesión Concurrente 3D
Moderadora: Nadia Álvarez Mexía, Directora de Iniciativas Latinoamericanas, Colegio de Posgrado, The University of Arizona, EEUU
Programas de movilidad e investigación para estudiantes de licenciatura internacionales en la University of Arizona: Una experiencia profesional
Idioma de la presentación: Inglés
Nadia Álvarez Mexía, Directora de Iniciativas Latinoamericanas, Colegio de Posgrados, University of Arizona, EEUU
Adrián Arroyo, Estudiante de Posgrado, University of Arizona, EEUU
Los participantes obtendrán información detallada sobre programas internacionales de investigación y movilidad para estudiantes de pregrado incluyendo aspectos tales como las actividades, costos y perfiles de los participantes. Durante la presentación, estudiantes egresados hablarán sobre cómo
estos programas les ayudaron a construir su carrera profesional en la ciencia, tecnología, ciencias sociales y educación. La presentación incluye también
opiniones de los miembros de la facultad con respecto a los programas y su impacto en la comunidad internacional de la educación superior.
La escuela de verano como una estrategia para incrementar la movilidad
Idioma de la presentación: Inglés
Maria Mahauad, Coordinadora del Programa de Movilidad, Relaciones Internacionales, Universidad Técnica Particular de Loja, ECUADOR
Ana Bravo, Coordinador de Cooperación Internacional, Universidad Técnica Particular de Loja, ECUADOR
La escuela de verano como una estrategia para incrementar la movilidad- pensar globalmente y actuar localmente es la visión del proceso de internacionalización de la UTPL. Alianzas internacionales, proyectos binacionales, participación en redes, convenios, asesoramiento y pasantías para profesores y
estudiantes son estrategias de la UTPL. La movilidad es esencial para asegurar la calidad en la educación superior y es también un pilar importante para
el intercambio y la colaboración con otras partes del mundo. Promover la movilidad de buena calidad de estudiantes, investigadores, profesores y otros
Page 39
Jueves, 9 de octubre
Sostenibilidad de la migración académica China: Una experiencia de liderazgo para estudiantes chinos de negocios
internacionales de nuevo ingreso
miembros del personal en la educación superior ha sido un objetivo central de la UTPL. La UTPL tiene cinco programas de movilidad: programa de intercambio de pregrado; prácticas a nivel pregrado y posgrado; escuela de verano para pregrado y posgrado; programas de intercambio de investigación
de pregrado y posgrado y facultad y movilidad de personal.
2:15 - 3:45 P.M.
Arizona Ballroom Salón 10
Sesión Concurrente 3E
Moderador: Sergio Puig, Profesor Asociado, James E. Rogers College of Law, The University of Arizona, EEUU
Globalización de la Educación de Leyes
Jueves, 9 de octubre
Idioma de la presentación: Inglés
Sergio Puig, Profesor Asociado, James E. Rogers College of Law, University of Arizona, EEUU
Cristina Castañeda, Director de Programas Globales, James E. Rogers College of Law, The University of Arizona, EEUU
Jaime Olaiz-Gonzalez, Profesor de Derecho Internacional y Jurisprudencia Americana, Universidad Panamericana, MÉXICO
Paola Cravioto, Candidato a JD, James E. Rogers College of Law, The University of Arizona, EEUU
La Facultad de Leyes de la University of Arizona (UA) se ha convertido en líder en la educación jurídica global. Nuestros crecientes Programas Globales
llevan a la Facultad de Leyes de la UA a otras facultades de derecho alrededor del mundo y también traen de vuelta a las aulas nuevos conocimientos y
diferentes perspectivas. Por ejemplo, nuestro programa JD para abogados se compone de más del 25 por ciento de estudiantes que vienen fuera de los
Estados Unidos. Ninguna otra facultad de derecho en Estados Unidos tiene tal diversidad mundial en su clase de JD. Nuestro Programa de Colaboración
Global de Leyes ofrece a estudiantes fuera de los EEUU la oportunidad de obtener su licenciatura en derecho en su país de origen y un JD de la facultad
de leyes en la UA en dos años menos de lo que se necesitaría para obtener los dos títulos por separado. Hemos participado en 12 de estas asociaciones
de doble titulación en los últimos 3 años, con 7 más en distintas fases de negociación. Conectando la educación jurídica global con la tecnología, la
facultad de leyes de la UA, también está trabajando para ampliar oportunidades de grados en línea para los estudiantes internacionales de derecho.
Acompáñenos para aprender más sobre la educación en leyes y para escuchar de nuestros Colaboradores Globales y los estudiantes.
2:15 - 3:45 P.M.
Arizona Ballroom Salón 11
Sesión Concurrente 3F
Moderadora: Laura Provencher, Analista de Riesgos Internacionales, The University of Arizona, EEUU
Viajes de alto riesgo
Idioma de la presentación: Inglés
Laura Provencher, Analista de Riesgos Internacionales, Oficina de Iniciativas Globales, University of Arizona, EEUU
Jill Calderon, Director del Programa de Desarrollo de Proyectos Latinoamericanos, Department of Study Abroad, The University of Arizona, EEUU
Dale LaFleur, Director de Relaciones Institucionales, University of Arizona, EEUU
Julienne Lottering, Asesor de Seguridad en el Extranjero, The University of Toronto, CANADÁ
Reconociendo que todo viaje implica un riesgo, la University of Arizona (UA) y la Universidad de Toronto han creado procesos para facilitar los viajes
de alto riesgo. Cada proceso consiste en evaluar los riesgos para cada viajero y prepararlos para cada destino. En lugar de cancelar automáticamente
programas o viajes, este proceso particular permite a universidades con tolerancia al alto riesgo considerar individualmente viajes y destinos de alto
riesgo. Esta sesión compartirá el desarrollo de sistemas de dos universidades y lo que se implica en la evaluación de un viaje. Se hará hincapié a estudios
de caso, centrándose en las características funcionales de colaboración con el ITESM que permitió la consideración de viajes estudiantiles a Monterrey.
Page 40
2:15 - 3:45 P.M.
Arizona Ballroom Salón 12
Sesión Concurrente 3G
Moderador: David Vassar, Asistente del Presidente, Rice University, EEUU
Consorcio Puentes
Idioma de la presentación: Inglés
David Vassar, Asistente del Presidente, Rice University, EEUU
Jill DeZapien, Decano Asociado de Programas Comunitarios, Colegio de Salud Pública, The University of Arizona, EEUU
Formada por cinco universidades de México y de Estados Unidos, el Consorcio Puentes proporciona una voz distintiva para la comunidad binacional
de académicos que realizan investigaciones multidisciplinarias sobre temas de importancia para las relaciones entre México y Estados Unidos y para el
bienestar de sus habitantes.
3:45 - 4:00 P.M.
Área de exhibiciones
Receso para café
Arizona Ballroom
Sesión Plenaria III “Apoyando al Compromiso Regional a Través de Alianzas Internacionales Innovadoras”
Facilitador: Héctor Castellanos, Director de Capacitación para el Desarrollo Rural, Secretaría de Agricultura, Ganadería, Recursos Naturales, Pesca y
Alimentación (SAGARPA), Gobierno de la República Mexicana, MÉXICO
Ponentes:
Liliana Aguirre, Productora, Mi Ranchito Bananas, MÉXICO
Jorge Galo Medina Torres, Director General de Desarrollo de Capacidades y Extensionismo Rural, Secretaría de Agricultura, Ganadería, Recursos
Naturales, Pesca y Alimentación (SAGARPA), Gobierno de la República Mexicana, MÉXICO
Ligia Noemí Osorno Magaña, Directora General, Instituto Nacional para el Desarrollo de Capacidades del Sector Rural (INCA), MÉXICO
5:30 - 6:30 P.M.
JW Marriott Primo Entrance
Receso y traslado en autobús a The University of Arizona
6:30 – 8:30 P.M.
The University of Arizona, Student Union, North Ballroom
Cena y Entrega de Premios CONAHEC
8:30 - 9:00 P.M.
Traslado en autobús al JW Marriott Starr Pass
Page 41
Jueves, 9 de octubre
4:00 - 5:30 P.M.
6:00 A.M. – 7:00 A.M.
Punto de reunión en el lobby del hotel
Caminata guiada en Tucson Mountain Park (opcional – ofrecida por el JW Marriott StarrPass)
8:00 A.M. - 9:30 A.M.
Arizona Registration Desk
Información y registro para CONAHEC y SONA
8:00 A.M. - 9:15 A.M.
Arizona Ballroom
Desayuno y Sesión de información sobre el CONAHEC (Abierto a todos los participantes de la conferencia)
Sean Manley-Casimir, Director Ejecutivo, CONAHEC
Justin Dutram, Coordinador de Movilidad, CONAHEC
Marianna Velázquez, Coordinador de Membresías, CONAHEC
Randy Burd, Vice Presidente Adjunto para la Innovación Programática, Oficina de Iniciativas Globales, The University of Arizona
Ash Scheder-Black, Director de Tecnologías de la Información, Oficina de Iniciativas Globales, The University of Arizona
¡Sírvase un plato y acompáñenos para conocer acerca de los programas y servicios del CONAHEC y las futuras oportunidades de colaboración!
8:00 - 9:15 A.M.
Área de exhibiciones
Desayuno Buffet (Abierto a todos los participantes de la conferencia – mesas disponibles en Arizona Ballroom)
9:15 - 10:45 A.M.
Arizona Ballroom
Sesión Concurrente 4A
Moderadora: Lorrie Clemo, Vicerrectora para Asuntos Académicos, State Universito of New York at Oswego, EEUU
Asociación Internacional de Educación Superior para la Prosperidad: Una Colaboración Sostenible entre Estados
Unidos y Costa Rica
Viernes, 10 de octubre
Idioma de la presentación: Inglés
Lorrie Clemo, Vicerrector de Asuntos Académicos, State University of New York at Oswego, EEUU
Efstathios Kefallonitis, Profesor Asociado de Administración de Empresas, State University of New York at Oswego, EEUU
Describimos una colaboración innovadora entre empresarios, el gobierno y la educación superior que ofrece un modelo para el desarrollo de habilidades y la promoción de una economía innovadora a través de fronteras internacionales. Con diferentes fuerzas impactando la educación superior
y la economía, construimos activamente una asociación de educación en el extranjero que es tanto relevante como de liderazgo para el siglo XXI. El
programa de negocios de SUNY Oswego-Costa Rica reunió a líderes de educación superior, el gobierno y la comunidad empresarial para mejorar las
habilidades del estudiante y para aumentar la competitividad de los países participantes. Construido sobre las fortalezas de nuestro sector, el proyecto
de movilidad estudiantil incluyó una visión estratégica compuesta por tres partes para educación superior, las empresas y el gobierno que tiene potencial de crecer para crear un mayor impacto: 1. Alinear la oferta académica con las necesidades de la fuerza laboral donde las empresas tomen un
papel directo en ayudar a formar estudiantes a través de actividades del curso. 2. Fomentar un ecosistema de competencia global donde las empresas
y el gobierno se asocien con el sector educativo para co-crear una agenda de innovación. 3. Formar sinergias para optimizar activos intelectuales y
aprovechar la estrategia de desarrollo económico para alcanzar nuevos niveles de prosperidad. Estos tres esfuerzos tienen un solo tema unificador: la
prosperidad gracias a la colaboración.
Page 42
9:15 - 10:45 A.M.
Arizona Ballroom Salón 5
Sesión Concurrente 4B
Moderadora: Beatriz Vera-López, Profesora de Inglés como Idioma Extranjero, Facultad de Estudios Superiores Zaragoza, Universidad
Nacional Autónoma de México, MÉXICO
Los programas de entrenamiento de interpretación y traducción son clave para la colaboración global: El enfoque
del modelo de la University of Arizona
Idioma de la presentación: Inglés
Paul Gatto, Director Asistente, Centro Nacional para Interpretación, University of Arizona, EEUU
No puede haber colaboración sin una sólida comunicación. Esto es especialmente cierto a través de fronteras. Las diferencias culturales y lingüísticas
pueden enriquecer la experiencia humana, pero si estas no se conectan efectivamente, pueden ser barreras para la justicia, la educación, el comercio,
la salud, y otras instituciones importantes de la sociedad. A menudo, los esfuerzos para reducir la brecha entre dos idiomas y culturas llegan demasiado
tarde. Sin embargo, cada vez más, se está reconociendo la necesidad de proporcionar servicios de idiomas mediante intérpretes altamente calificados
y traductores. Es tarea de las instituciones de educación superior satisfacer esta necesidad. El Centro Nacional de Interpretación de la University of
Arizona tiene varios programas interrelacionados de traducción e interpretación que desarrollan estas habilidades a nivel pregrado, posgrado y profesional. Estos programas introducen y desarrollan conocimientos prácticos, reales y las habilidades necesarias para eliminar divisiones lingüísticas y
culturales. Durante esta sesión hablaremos de los programas específicos de pregrado, posgrado y profesionales de la University of Arizona, así como de
maneras en las que pueden utilizarse como herramientas o modelos por otros individuos e instituciones.
Comunicación interdisciplinaria: Retos interculturales e interlingüísticos
Idioma de la presentación: Español
Beatriz Vera-López, Profesor de Inglés como Idioma Foráneo, Facultad de Estudios Superiores Zaragoza, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México,
MÉXICO
Los problemas de comunicación interdisciplinaria son similares a los problemas de comunicación intercultural, más evidentemente en colaboraciones
en donde algunos de los socios utilizan un lenguaje internacional aprendido como el inglés. Esta presentación analizará la aplicación de estrategias
de comunicación intercultural para aliviar la dificultad de colaboración interdisciplinaria frente a la creciente especialización en diversas áreas. En mi
presentación demostraré los resultados de un proyecto de investigación activa realizado en un taller de diez semanas de resúmenes de inglés escritos
por profesores de habla Hispana y por estudiantes de posgrado de la Facultad de Estudios Superiores Zaragoza, UNAM. Los participantes provinieron
de distintas disciplinas (psicología, psiquiatría, educación, química, ingeniería química, biología y salud pública). Al final, los participantes llegaron a
conclusiones interesantes sobre la relación entre contenido, idioma y culturas disciplinarias en perspectivas nacionales e internacionales.
Guías para reanimación o resucitación cardiopulmonar y terapia eléctrica en lenguas indígenas
Idioma de la presentación: Español
Page 43
Viernes, 10 de octubre
Luis Manuel Espinosa Castillo, Coordinador de la Carrera Técnico Superior Universitario en Emergencias, Seguridad Laboral y Rescates y Jefe del
Laboratorio de Cardiología, Universidad de Guadalajara, MÉXICO
El 80% de las muertes súbitas son de origen cardiaco y aproximadamente el 12,5% de las defunciones que se producen de forma natural son súbitas,
calculándose que para el año 2020, la patología cardiovascular, continuará siendo la primera causa de muerte en los países centrales y la tercera en los
que están en vías de desarrollo. Las cifras difieren de acuerdo con la población; la población hablante de lengua indígena en México asciende a más de
6,695,228 habitantes. La mortalidad entre la población de habla indígena es muy alta, y la tercera causa de muerte en ellos es de causa cardiovascular.
Por lo tanto, es de suma importancia, que la población de habla indígena se mantenga informada de las principales causas de muerte de origen cardiovascular, tener conocimiento de la Reanimación o Resucitación Cardiopulmonar básica, así como el saber atender de manera oportuna una muerte
súbita por fibrilación ventricular por medio de un desfibrilador externo automático. Se requiere urgentemente establecer el apoyo de la reanimación o
resucitación cardiopulmonar con terapia eléctrica en México y territorios habitados principalmente por indígenas.
9:15 - 10:45 A.M.
Arizona Ballroom Salón 8
Sesión Concurrente 4C
Moderadora: Imelda Olague-Caballero, Investigadora, New Mexico State University, EEUU
Haciendo frente a los retos de movilidad estudiantil: un programa a nivel licenciatura de doble titulación en
ingeniería aeroespacial a través de las fronteras
Idioma de la presentación: Inglés
Imelda Olague-Caballero, Investigador, Ingeniería Industrial, New Mexico State University, EEUU
Javier Gonzales-Cantu, Secretario Académico, Escuela de Ingeniería, Universidad Autónoma de Chihuahua, MÉXICO
Ricardo Torres-Knight, Decano de Ingeniería, Universidad Autónoma de Chihuahua, MÉXICO
Esta presentación analizará el establecimiento, la articulación y el progreso de una sociedad académica pionera dirigida a ofrecer un programa de doble
titulación en el área de ingeniería aeroespacial. El objetivo era diseñar un modelo educativo innovador para la colaboración académica internacional
donde la movilidad estudiantil, el desarrollo curricular y la transferencia de créditos se implementaron con éxito. Vamos a describir la estructura del programa académico, los principios operativos y procedimientos administrativos que apoyan el programa, así como el proceso de selección de estudiantes,
los requisitos de inscripción y los retos a los que se enfrentaron los estudiantes, por ejemplo, las barreras de idioma, la preparación académica irregular,
el choque cultural y adaptación, vivienda, tiempo de proceso de solicitud de visa para el estudiante y otras dificultades financieras. Se presentará también una evaluación de las fortalezas y debilidades del programa junto con un resumen de los resultados de su reciente proceso de acreditación. Los
resultados del programa revelan que los esfuerzos emprendidos por las instituciones comprometidas con esta asociación realmente han contribuido a
la formación de un nuevo tipo de ingeniero, capaz de competir en un entorno de trabajo altamente globalizado. Se espera que en un futuro cercano, los
estudiantes estadounidenses estén motivados para comenzar su carrera universitaria en México como parte de este programa.
Internacionalice su currículum de manera gratuita
Idioma de la presentación: Inglés
Doniphane Meslier, Coordinador Internacional/Mercadotecnia, Administración de Negocios, Universidad Simón Bolívar, COLOMBIA
Internacionalice su currículum de manera gratuita: 1. Aplicación de “clases-espejo” con nuestros socios internacionales 2. El uso de la tecnología MOOC
para internacionalizar el currículum 3. Creación de una red académica para compartir conferencias internacionales.
9:15 - 10:45 A.M.
Arizona Ballroom Salón 9
Sesión Concurrente 4D
Moderador: Lorenzo González Kipper, Director, Centro de Desarrollo Comunitario La Salle, Universidad La Salle Noroeste, MÉXICO
El “Centro de Desarrollo Comunitario La Salle” de la ULSA Noroeste
Viernes, 10 de octubre
Idioma de la presentación: Español
Lorenzo González Kipper, Director, Centro de Desarrollo Comunitario La Salle, Universidad la Salle Noroeste, MÉXICO
En el CDC La Salle, estudiantes de la ULSA y voluntarios de otras instituciones comparten sus talentos y sus conocimientos para promover el auto-crecimiento, una mejor calidad de vida y una sociedad más involucrada que buscan el bien común en la Comunidad Yaqui de Cócorit. Nosotros apoyamos
a esta comunidad ofreciendo una variedad de programas desarrollados para promover los derechos de los hombres y mujeres de tener un trabajo y de
proveer para sus familias, al mismo tiempo creando bienestar para toda la comunidad. Programas:
- Tutoría para adultos para que terminen la escuela primaria y secundaria con validación oficial.
- Organizar talleres en una amplia gama de actividades: deportes, artes y artesanías, costura, peluquería, cocina, música, inglés y computación.
- “La Misión Esperanza” donde los estudiantes de la ULSA y los maestros sirvan como voluntarios trabajando en su especialidad, como:
- asesoría profesional (financiera, legal o psicoeducativa)
- Un proyecto de desarrollo en arquitectura involucrando a las familias para que participen en la construcción de sus propias casas de
adobe sostenibles,
- un centro de nutrición que promueve hábitos saludables de alimentación,
- una campaña legal para corregir las irregularidades en las actas de nacimiento.
- La “Misión Yaqui” promueve todo el año actividades de evangelización para los niños desfavorecidos y sus familias.
- Servicios de biblioteca y laboratorio de computación.
Avanzar y crecer, pero nunca olvidar lo básico
Idioma de la presentación: Español
Allan Alexander Amador Cervantes, Rector, Universidad Tecnológica de La Paz, MÉXICO
Kenno Aleen Amador Cervantes, Director, Universidad Tecnológica de La Paz, MÉXICO
Esta presentación es una reflexión sobre lo básico que nunca debe olvidarse durante el crecimiento y maduración de una universidad. Los rectores que
son fundadores de una universidad tienen conocimientos importantes que deben ser rescatados por aquellos rectores que asumen la responsabilidad
en instituciones con larga trayectoria. Debe llevarse un balance al mantener lo que es importante a medida que crece más a través del tiempo.
Page 44
9:15 - 10:45 A.M.
Arizona Ballroom Salón 10
Sesión Concurrente 4E
Moderador: José Lever, Director, Oficina de la Universidad de Arizona en México, The University of Arizona, EEUU
Posgrados UPAEP, modelo estratégico de colaboración internacional en educación superior
Idioma de la presentación: Inglés
Elizabeth Vazquez Quitl, Directora de Posgrados UPAEP, Universidad Popular Autónoma del Estado de Puebla, MÉXICO
Martha Alejandra Cabañas Villa, Coordinadora, Posgrados UPAEP, Universidad Popular Autónoma del Estado de Puebla, MÉXICO
Hoy en día la colaboración ha venido a ser un punto medular en la constitución de relaciones exitosas de investigación, desarrollo, innovación y vinculación entre las universidades y su entorno. Muestra de ello es el modelo Posgrados UPAEP, que determinado por la excelencia académica y modelado por el tiempo, se ha convertido en un referente exitoso de buenas prácticas en el ámbito de colaboración internacional en educación superior.
Posgrados UPAEP tiene muy claro el hecho de que actualmente la educación no se circunscribe a un entorno local o regional, si no que va más allá de
los límites físicos, rompiendo fronteras y acercando cada vez más a diferentes actores del proceso educativo. Profesores y alumnos han encontrado un
amplio potencial de desarrollo en los programas duales de Posgrados UPAEP con universidades como Oklahoma State University, Purdue University, The
University of Tennessee, IEMI –Institute Européen du Management International, Universidad de Málaga y Universitat Rovira i Virgili, entre otras. Una
experiencia internacional es posible gracias a los convenios de intercambio, Faculty Led y estancias de investigación que Posgrados UPAEP ha creado y
difundido a gran escala a un ritmo acelerado y con un número cada vez más creciente de colaboradores en el ámbito global.
Nuevas tendencias y modelos de la cooperación académica y científica
Idioma de la presentación: Español
Claudia González-Brambila, Profesora, Administración de Negocios, ITAM, MÉXICO
José Lever, Coordinador, Oficina en México, The University of Arizona, EEUU
Silvia González-Brambila, Profesora, UAM-Azcapotzalco, MÉXICO
Esta mesa tendrá tres presentaciones relacionadas con la cooperación académica y científica. La primera mostrará la cooperación científica de mexicanos con investigadores del resto del mundo. La segunda mostrará el nuevo modelo de cooperación académica y científica de la University of Arizona con
México. Finalmente, la tercera presentación mostrará un análisis del intercambio académico de estudiantes de ingeniería de la Universidad Autónoma
Metropolitana-Azcapotzalco.
10:45 - 11:00 A.M.
Área de exhibiciones
Receso para café
11:00 A.M. - 12:30 P.M.
Arizona Ballroom
Sesión Plenaria IV “Los próximos 20 años: perspectivas sobre el futuro de la colaboración de la educación
superior en América del norte y el mundo”
Ponentes:
Raúl Arias, Ex-Presidente de la Universidad Veracruzana (México), Ex-Presidente de la Organización Universitaria Interamericana (OUI) y Director
Ejecutivo del Campus – OUI, ECUADOR
John E. Fowler, Director Adjunto, SUNY Center for Collaborative Online International Learning (COIL Center), EEUU
Sharon Hobenshield, Directora, Aboriginal Education and Engagement, Vancouver Island University, CANADÁ
Maurits Van Rooijen, Presidente, Grupo Compostela, ESPAÑA
Page 45
Viernes, 10 de octubre
Facilitador: David Longanecker, Presidente del Consejo Directivo del CONAHEC y Presidente de la Western Interstate Commission for Higher Education (WICHE), EEUU
Viernes, 10 de octubre
12:30 - 1:00 P.M.
Arizona Ballroom
Clausura “Una renovada agenda de trabajo para la colaboración de la educación superior en América del
Norte”
Introducción:
Ricardo Pineda, Cónsul General de México en Tucson, Secretaría de Relaciones Exteriores, Gobierno de la República Mexicana, MÉXICO
Ponente:
Francisco Marmolejo, Jefe de la Educación Terciaria, El Banco Mundial, EEUU
5:30 P.M. - 6:00 P.M.
Salud Terrace
La Leyenda de Arriba Abajo Brindis con Tequila
Sábado, 11 de octubre
Sábado, 11 de octubre del 2014
9:00 A.M. - 12:00 P.M.
JW Marriott Tucson Starr Pass Resort y Spa Lobby
Visita de Pos-conferencia a la Biósfera 2
Acompañante: PC
Hora de salida: 9:00 AM
Costo: $80 (Incluye comida y transporte - compre con anticipación su boleto en la mesa de registro afuera del Salón Arizona Ballroom)
La Biósfera 2 está situada al norte de Tucson, Arizona en la base de las impresionantes montañas de Santa Catalina. Esta instalación única para la investigación en la Universidad de Arizona se asienta sobre una cresta en una elevación de casi 4000
pies rodeada de una magnífica reserva natural del desierto. Investigación sobre el futuro de nuestro planeta se desarrolla
aquí en tiempo real en estos ecosistemas especialmente diseñados. Time Life Books recientemente identificó a la Biósfera 2,
entre las 50 maravillas del mundo que se tienen que visitar. Esperamos que tome ventaja de esta gran oportunidad.
Page 46
CONAHEC Consejo Directivo
Denise Amyot, Presidenta, Association of Canadian Community Colleges (ACCC), CANADÁ
David Atkinson, Vice Presidente del Consejo Directivo del CONAHEC y Presidente, MacEwan University, CANADÁ
Mary Ayala, Decana del Colegio de Artes y Ciencias, Eastern New Mexico University, EEUU
Emilio J. Baños Ardavín, Rector, Universidad Popular Autónoma del Estado de Puebla, MÉXICO
Gail Bowkett, Director de Relaciones Internacionales, Association of Universities and Colleges
of Canada (AUCC), CANADÁ
Walter Bumphus, Presidente y CEO, American Association of Community Colleges (AACC), EEUU
José Alfonso Esparza Ortiz, Rector, Benemérita Universidad Autónoma de Puebla, MÉXICO
Enrique Fernández Fassnacht, Secretario General Ejecutivo, Asociación Nacional de Universidades
e Instituciones de Educación Superior (ANUIES), MÉXICO
Jocelyne Gacel, Presidenta, Asociación Mexicana para la Educación Internacional (AMPEI), MÉXICO
Leslie Hendricks, Presidenta, Asociación Nacional de Universidades Tecnológicas (ANUT), MÉXICO
Tomas Jiménez, Director Ejecutivo de la Oficina del Presidente, Inter American University of Puerto Rico, EEUU
Joan Landeros, Directora del Centro para la Educación Internacional, Universidad La Salle, MÉXICO
Fernando León-García, Vice-Presidente del Consejo Directivo del CONAHEC y Presidente, CETYS Universidad, MÉXICO
David Longanecker, Presidente del Consejo Directivo del CONAHEC y Presidente, Western Interstate
Commission for Higher Education (WICHE), EEUU
Sean Manley-Casimir, Director Ejecutivo, CONAHEC
Patti McGill Peterson, Asesora a la Presidenta sobre Vinculación Global, American Council on Education (ACE), EEUU
Mike Proctor, Vice Presidente de Iniciativas Globales, University of Arizona, EEUU
Lorna Smith, Directora de Educación Internacional, Mount Royal University, CANADÁ
Paule Têtu, Asociada al Vice Presidente de Investigación e Innovación, Université Laval, CANADÁ
Sylvie Thériault, Directora General, Cégep International, CANADÁ
Marianna Velázquez, Coordinadora, Organización Estudiantil de América del Norte (SONA)
Jun Young Kim, Presidente, Sungkyunkwan University, COREA
Page 47
About CONAHEC
What is “CONAHEC” and
what is its mission?
The Consortium for North American
Higher Education Collaboration’s mission
is simple but powerful: to advance collaboration, cooperation, and community
building among higher education institutions in North America.
How did it all begin?
CONAHEC was launched in 1993 as a U.S.Mexico borderlands initiative, founded
by the Western Interstate Commission
for Higher Education (WICHE) in partnership with the Mexican Association for
International Education (AMPEI). In 1995,
CONAHEC opened its headquarters at the
University of Arizona. Both WICHE and the
University of Arizona oversee CONAHEC’s
programs, and both are registered non
profit organizations.
Our bi-national focus became trilateral
with the addition of Canada in 1997. Today,
this tri-national consortium serves over
130 member institutions and higher education organizations in the three countries.
CONAHEC is an inclusive network, but it
does require that its members belong to
one of the national education associations
(i.e., the American Council on Education;
the Association of Universities and Colleges of Canada; or, the Mexican Association of Institutions of Higher Education,
the Association of Canadian Community
Colleges, and the American Association
of Community Colleges), or be accredited
by one of the U.S. accrediting agencies or
by FIMPES, in the case of Mexican private
universities.
CONAHEC’s culturally diverse and multilingual staff originate from all three NAFTA
(North American Free Trade Agreement)
countries and have more than 50 years of
combined international experience. They
work in concert to advise and connect
higher education institutions interested
in establishing or strengthening academic
collaborative programs in the United
States, Canada, and Mexico. The consortium is governed by a board of directors
which is comprised of four representatives
of our member institutions from each
country, plus representatives from six
national education associations.
Why is collaboration
among universities and
colleges in North America
important?
The economic activity generated by NAFTA
has wildly surpassed its initiators’ expectations, making Canada, Mexico and the
United States each other’s most important
trading partners. Higher education institutions must now respond by developing
strategic partnerships to train globally
savvy “North Americans” who can support
our shared regional economy. The need
to internationalize our higher education
institutions is more critical than ever, but
in today’s economic downturn, we must
look to more cost-effective channels to
achieve this goal. Addressing the issues of
globalization by focusing regionally makes
good economic and geographic sense.
International experiences are awaiting
our students and faculty, right in our own
backyard!
NAFTA provides the rationale and context
to enhance opportunities and remove
barriers that limit the flow of students and
scholars – and of academic and professional ideas, projects, and practices –
across North American borders. CONAHEC
is the most visible and vital organization
of its kind and is seeking to expand its
network in order to create more student
and faculty exchange opportunities in the
region.
How do we promote
collaboration?
CONAHEC’s central activities include:
• Providing online information and networking through its portal (http://conahec.
org), which has become the primary online
resource for information and discussion
of trilateral education issues. Constituents
can find partners, funding opportunities,
events, online discussions, and more.
• Brokering student exchanges and providing internship opportunities among institutions and businesses in North America
through its student exchange program.
The regional program is based on multi-institutional tuition reciprocity agreements,
and serves students both at the undergraduate and graduate levels.
• Preparing the future leaders of North
America by involving our students in the
regional dialogue through SONA, the
Student Organization of North America,
which serves as a framework for studentled cooperation across national boundaries.
• Fostering U.S.-Mexico borderlands collaboration through a border network of
higher education institutions, community
organizations, and government agencies.
• Convening the higher education community and enabling its leaders and practitioners to address specific issues of relevance
in North America.
• Conducting comparative research on
educational policy issues affecting North
America.
• Providing professional development
opportunities by delivering executive
workshops on the differences among the
national systems of higher education,
language immersion programs, and in-situ
internships for campus administrators,
faculty, and students.
How is CONAHEC funded?
Despite a very competitive funding environment, CONAHEC’s proven track record
and reputation have won it the support
of the following major funders: the Ford
Foundation; the William and Flora Hewlett
Foundation; the Lumina Foundation for
Education; the Western Union Foundation;
the Fund for the Improvement of Postsecondary Education (FIPSE); the Mexican
Ministry of Education; the U.S. Dept. of
State; and the Dept. of Foreign Affairs and
International Trade of Canada. Additional
funders include corporate and government
agencies which co-sponsor CONAHEC’s
conferences.
For more information,
contact us at:
Consortium for North American Higher
Education Collaboration (CONAHEC)
The University of Arizona
PO Box 210300
Tucson, AZ
85721-0300 USA
Phone: (520) 621-7761
Fax: (520) 626-2675
Email: lvaldes@u.arizona.edu
Page 48
CONAHEC Members
Canada
Association of Canadian Community
Colleges
Association of Universities and Colleges of
Canada
Canadian Bureau for International
Education
CÉGEP International
Concordia University
Inter-American Organization for Higher
Education
Kwantlen Polytechnic University
Langara College
MacEwan University
Mount Royal University
Northern Alberta Institute of Technology
Royal Roads University
Selkirk College
Université Laval
University of Alberta
University of Manitoba
Mexico
Asociación Mexicana para la Educación
Internacional
Asociación Nacional de Universidades e
Instituciones de Educación Superior
Asociación Nacional de Universidades
Politécnicas
Asociación Nacional de Universidades
Tecnológicas
Benemérita Universidad Autónoma de
Puebla
Centro de Enseñanza Técnica Industrial
Centro de Enseñanza Técnica y Superior
Centro de Estudios Universitarios
Centro de Investigación y Docencia
Económicas, A.C.
Consorcio de Universidades Mexicanas
El Colegio de la Frontera Norte
El Colegio de Sonora
Federación de Instituciones Mexicanas
Particulares de Educación Superior
(FIMPES)
Instituto de Estudios Superiores de
Tamaulipas
Instituto de Estudios Universitarios, A.C.
Instituto Nacional de Salud Pública
Instituto Politécnico Nacional
Instituto Tecnológico de Sonora
Instituto Tecnológico Superior de Cajeme
Instituto Tecnológico Superior de Huichapan
Instituto Tecnológico y de Estudios Superiores de Monterrey - Campus Guadalajara
Instituto Tecnológico y de Estudios Superiores de Monterrey - Campus León
Instituto Tecnológico y de Estudios
Superiores de Monterrey - Campus
Sonora Norte
Sistema ITESM
Universidad Anáhuac
Universidad Anáhuac del Sur
Universidad Anáhuac Xalapa
Universidad Autónoma Agraria Antonio
Narro
Universidad Autónoma de Aguascalientes
Universidad Autónoma de Baja California
Universidad Autónoma de Chiapas
Universidad Autónoma de Chihuahua
Universidad Autónoma de Ciudad Juárez
Universidad Autónoma de Coahuila
Universidad Autónoma de Guadalajara
Universidad Autónoma de la Laguna
Universidad Autónoma de Nuevo León
Universidad Autónoma de San Luis Potosí
Universidad Autónoma de Sinaloa
Universidad Autónoma de Yucatán
Universidad Autónoma del Carmen
Universidad Autónoma del Estado de
Hidalgo
Universidad Autónoma del Noreste
Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana
Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana
Unidad Azcapotzalco
Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana
Unidad Cuajimalpa
Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana
Unidad Iztapalapa
Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana
Unidad Xochimilco
Universidad Cristóbal Colón
Universidad de Colima
Universidad de Guadalajara
Universidad de Guanajuato
Universidad de las Américas Puebla
Universidad de Montemorelos
Universidad de Monterrey
Universidad de Occidente
Universidad de Quintana Roo
Universidad de Sonora
Universidad del Caribe
Universidad del Centro de México
Universidad del Mayab
Universidad del Noreste
Universidad del Pedregal
Universidad del Valle de Atemajac
Universidad del Valle de Puebla, S.C.
Universidad Estatal de Sonora
Universidad Iberoamericana
Universidad Insurgentes
Universidad Juárez Autónoma de Tabasco
Universidad Juárez del Estado de Durango
Universidad La Salle
Universidad La Salle Noroeste
Universidad Latina de América
Universidad Nacional Autónoma de
México
Universidad Pedagógica Nacional
Universidad Politécnica de Pachuca
Universidad Politécnica de Quintana Roo
Universidad Popular Autónoma del Estado
de Puebla
Universidad Tecnológica de León
Universidad Tecnológica de Puebla
Universidad Tecnológica de Tula-Tepeji
Universidad Tecnológica del Suroeste de
Guanajuato
Universidad Vasco de Quiroga, A.C.
Universidad Veracruzana
United States
Alamo Colleges
American Association of Community
Colleges
American Association of State Colleges
and Universities
American Council on Education
American Speech-Language-Hearing
Association
Association of International Education
Administrators
Austin Community College
Border Trade Alliance
California Colleges for International
Education
Chamber of the Americas
City University of Seattle
Dallas County Community College District
Drake University
Eastern New Mexico University
Eastern Washington University
Institute of International Education
Inter American University of Puerto Rico
Keck Graduate Institute
Kutztown University of Pennsylvania
Lenoir-Rhyne University
Lewis & Clark College
Lyon College
Methodist University
Miami Dade College
Montana State University
Network of International Education
Associations
New Mexico State University
Old Dominion University
Rice University
Santa Monica College
Texas A&M International University
Texas A&M University - Kingsville
Texas A&M University - San Antonio
Texas Christian University
Texas State University - San Marcos
The Forum on Education Abroad
Troy University
University of Arizona
University of California, Davis
University of Central Missouri
University of Delaware
University of Michigan-Flint
University of New Mexico
University of North Texas
University of San Diego
University of Texas - Pan American
University of Texas at Brownsville and
Texas Southmost College
University of Texas at El Paso
University of Texas at San Antonio
University of Wisconsin System
Western Interstate Commission for Higher
Education
Western New Mexico University
CONAHEC Affiliates
Argentina
Universidad Nacional de Quilmes
Universidad Nacional del Nordeste
Bolivia
Universidad del Valle, Bolivia
Brazil
Pontificia Universidade Católica do Rio Grande do Sul
Universidade Estadual Paulista Júlio de Mesquita Filho, UNESP
Universidade Federal do Paraná
Burkina Faso
International Institute for Water and Environmental Engineering
Chile
Universidad de Santiago de Chile
Universidad de Viña del Mar
Universidad Mayor
Universidad San Sebastián
Colombia
Pontificia Universidad Javeriana
Universidad de La Salle
Universidad del Norte
Universidad Distrital Francisco José de Caldas
Costa Rica
Universidad de Ciencias Médicas
Universidad de Iberoamérica
Dominican Republic
Instituto Tecnológico de Santo Domingo
Ecuador
Universidad ECOTEC
Universidad Técnica Particular de Loja
Finland
Abo Akademi University
France
OCDE-Programme on Institutional Management in Higher
Education
Guatemala
Universidad Rafael Landívar
Honduras
Universidad Tecnológica Centroamericana
Iceland
Reykjavik University
Jamaica
Association of Caribbean Universities and Research Institutes
Korea
Asia-Pacific Association for International Education
Hankuk University of Foreign Studies
Hanyang University
Konkuk University
Sungkyunkwan University (SKKU)
Malaysia
Universiti Sains Malaysia
Spain
Compostela Group of Universities
Universidad de Almería
Universidad de Oviedo
Universidad del País Vasco
Taiwan
MingDao University
Hotel Information
JW Marriott Starr Pass
Signature Grill with Patio Dining.......... Continental
is located at:
3800 W. Starr Pass Boulevard
Tucson, AZ 85745 United States
1-520-792-3500
Our award-winning Tucson, AZ restaurant features finedining with a distinctly Southwestern blend of Mexican, Native American, and Cowboy influences. Inspired entrées are
complemented by an extensive wine list. And don’t miss
the Breakfast Buffet!
The JW Marriott Starr Pass resort is the perfect escape, with
recreation activities galore, plus refreshing pools featuring
our Starr Canyon River.
The variety of surrounding natural beauty is matched only
by the variety of ways to experience it, from parks and museums to Wild West tours.
A perfect fusion of luxury and the natural environment, our
resort hotel in Tucson is laced with hiking and bike trails
amongst the saguaro.
Hotel Amenities
•
Bar / Lounge
•
Business Center with Internet Access
•
Fitness Center with Gym / Workout Room
•
Children Activities ( Kid / Family Friendly )
•
Room Service
•
Spa
•
Swimming Pool
•
On-site Restaurants:
Breakfast, lunch and dinner | Dress code: Casual
Catalina Barbeque Co. & Sports Bar .........American
Tucson BBQ restaurants don’t get any better than this!
Featuring competition-style house-made sauces and rubs,
the award-winning Catalina Barbeque Co. serves succulent
smoked meats and other Southwestern specialties.
Lunch and dinner | Dress code: Casual
Salud .........................................................American
Indulge in the wide variety of tequilas and desert-inspired
cocktails offered here. Sunset and evening views from the
outdoor patio are not to be missed, and the festive daily
Tequila Toast at 5:30 p.m. is a Starr Pass tradition.
Dress code: Casual
Plunge Poolside Dining ........................ Sandwiches
You can be poolside and casual and still enjoy fine dining. Plunge restaurant serves delicious salads, sandwiches,
tacos, wraps and more. We specialize in cool cocktails, and
we also feature a kids menu with a nice variety of quickserved items.
Primo................................................ Mediterranean
Open for lunch | Dress code: Casual
Dining is redefined at our award-winning Tucson, AZ restaurant. Chef Melissa Kelly creates culinary using organic ingredients grown on the resort, complemented by a dazzling
list of wines and decadent desserts. Local. Fresh. Modern.
Starbucks® .........................................Coffee House
Open for dinner | Dress code: Casual
Even deep in the desert, we have your favorite cappuccinos, lattes, macchiatos, espressos, frappuccinos, mochas,
chais, muffins, scones, danishes, cakes and more. Or, if you
prefer, just a good ole cup of coffee!
Breakfast and lunch | Dress code: Casual
Page 51
Hotel Maps
Page 52
Hotel Maps
Nearby Dining
Cafe Poca Cosa............................................Mexican
6.2 miles
Phone: 1-520-622-6400
A neighborhood bistro in Downtown Tucson featuring modern American comfort food, eclectic wines, micro-brewed
beers and hand-cocktails.
In Cafe Poca Cosa, Chef/Owner Suzanna DeVila has placed
her imaginative Mexican cuisine within the lively confines
of a truly upscale, yet casual, downtown bistro setting.
Lunch and dinner | Dress code: Casual
Lunch and dinner | Dress code: Casual
Phone: 1-520-209-7681
Athens on 4th Ave..........................................Greek
5.8 miles
Mexico City cuisine and international bar located in heart of
downtown Tucson.
Phone: 1-520-624-6886
Lunch and dinner | Dress code: Casual
Athens on 4th Avenue is proud to serve authentic Greek
cuisine including artisan Greek dishes, fresh fish and
seafood, prime meats, vegetarian specialties, homemade
soups, and handmade desserts.
El Charro Cafe..............................................Mexican
Dinner | Dress code: Casual
B Line.........................................................American
5.9 miles
Phone: 1-520-882-7575
The B Line is a locally owned, bistro-nouvelle style restaurant located on 4th Avenue. Hip and modern with an
eclectic yet balanced menu, The B Line has been voted Best
Casual Dining by Tucson Weekly readers for eight years.
Penca...........................................................Mexican
6.1 miles
5.3 miles
Phone: 1-520-622-1922
Established in 1922, El Charro Café of Tucson, Arizona is The
Nation’s Oldest Mexican Restaurant in continuous operation by the same family. Featuring traditional Northern
Mexico-Sonoran style and innovative Tucson-style Mexican
Food, El Charro Café is truly as Gourmet Magazine wrote: “A
Taste Explosion”.
Lunch and dinner | Dress code: Casual
Vivace.............................................................Italian
14.8 miles
Breakfast, lunch and dinner | Dress code: Casual
Phone: 1-520-795-7221
Proper........................................................American
Consistently rated as one of Tucson’s best restaurants,
Vivace has a Tuscan décor proving northern Italian fare,
thoughtfully prepared with a great wine list.
6 miles
Phone: 1-520-396-3357
Proper serves brunch & dinner 7 days a week, with late
service until midnight every day and happy hour specials
Monday through Friday. They feature an upscale menu with
fresh, straightforward food with quality ingredients from
local and regional sources.
Lunch and dinner | Dress code: Casual
Wildflower.................................................American
12.9 miles
Phone: 1-520-219-4230
6.5 miles
Featuring an innovative New American Cuisine with updated American classics with European and Asian influence.
The menu changes often to take advantage of the freshest
seasonal ingredients available.
Phone: 1-520-207-8201
Lunch and dinner | Dress code: Casual
Hub offers American Classic Cuisine in a historic modern
space in downtown Tucson. We feature meats, ice cream
and beer. A child-friendly restaurant, they have something
for everyone.
Fleming’s Prime Steakhouse..................Steakhouse
Lunch and dinner | Dress code: Casual
HUB Restaurant & Creamery.....................American
14 miles
Phone: 1-520-529-5017
6.2 miles
With a contemporary twist on the classic steakhouse,
Fleming’s offers USDA prime steaks, market-fresh seafood,
decadent desserts, and award-winning wines. The savory
food and wine-pairings list makes ordering easy.
Phone: 1-520-624-4747
Lunch and dinner | Dress code: Casual
Lunch and dinner | Dress code: Casual
47 Scott.....................................................American
Page 54
Things To Do Around Tucson
Arizona State Museum
University of Arizona Poetry Center
Experience the enduring cultures of Arizona, the American
Southwest, and northern Mexico through dynamic exhibits,
engaging programs, and an educational museum store.
Discover Arizona’s first literary arts center and internationally renowned library collection of more than 70,000
poetry-related items. In Tucson
Located on the University of Arizona Campus.
Located on the University of Arizona Campus.
Center for Creative Photography
Biosphere 2
Experience this one-of-a-kind archive, museum and research center dedicated to photography as an art form and
cultural record.
Visitors can observe nature in a controlled state at this
world-famous steel and glass research center where desert,
forest, ocean and other ecosystems are monitored and
studied.
Located on the University of Arizona Campus.
Jim Click Hall of Champions
Live the heritage and rich traditions of Arizona Athletics.
Rotating exhibits feature historic moments in UA sports
history and the legendary Wildcat student-athletes and
coaches who have contributed to Arizona’s tradition of
excellence.
Located on the University of Arizona Campus.
Flandrau Science Center & Planetarium
Open your mind at Southern Arizona’s only planetarium,
with fun and educational programs for everyone. Hands-on
exhibits and sky shows highlight the wonders of science,
and music laser shows immerse audiences in light and
sound.
Located on the University of Arizona Campus.
University of Arizona Museum of Art
The University of Arizona Museum of Art houses wide-ranging collections of over 5,000 paintings, sculptures, prints
and drawings, with an emphasis on European and American
fine art from the Renaissance to the present.
Located on the University of Arizona Campus.
32540 S Biosphere Rd, Oracle, AZ 85739 | www.b2science.
org
Downtown Attractions
Downtown is the history and cultural hear of Tucson,
with ten near-by history districts, the Arts District, professional theatre, opera, ballet and symphony. Downtown’s
landmarks include the old Pima County Courthouse, St.
Agustine Cathedral, Hotel Congress, and two history train
depots. With unique shopping, restaurants, vintage theaters, bed-and-breakfasts, exciting nightlife, and eclectic
architecture.
100 S Church Ave, 85710
Arizona-Sonora Desert Museum
The Desert Museum interprets and showcases the Sonor-an
Desert region, widely recognized as the lushest desert on
earth. The museum is a fusion experience: zoo, botanical
garden, art gallery, natural history museum and aquarium.
It is one of the most respected natural history institutions
in the country.
2021 N Kinney Rd, 85743 | www.desertmuseum.org
Sabino Canyon
Located in the Catalina Mountains and part of the Coronado
National For-est, this beautiful canyon offers outdoor recreation including hiking, swimming, biking and picnicking.
5900 N Sabino Canyon Rd, 85750 | www.sabinocanyon.com
Page 55
Exhibitors List & Map
The Exhibitors area is located in the Foyer outside the Arizona Ballroom.
6. The University of Arizona
Center for English as a
Second Language
www.cesl.arizona.edu/
1. VisitTucson
www.visittucson.org/
2. Grand Canyon University
www.gcu.edu/
7. The University of Arizona
College of Humanities
humanities.arizona.edu/
3. Department of Foreign
Affairs, Trade and Development,
Government of Canada
http://www.international.gc.ca/
8. University and College
Intensive English Programs
(UCIEP)
www.uciep.org/
4. Partners of the Americas
www.partners.net/
9. International Test of
English Proficiency (iTEP)
www.itepexam.com/
5. Mexican Association for
International Education (AMPEI)
www.ampei.org.mx/
Arizona Ballroom
1
2
3
4
5
Foyer
Page 56
6
7
8
9
Programa de movilidad
internacional
Compromiso social
Sustentabilidad
76 programas de
licenciatura
90 programas
de posgrado
Más de 100
patentes
registradas
Rectoría
General
Five Campi and Headquarters
(Rectoría General)
Contacto : sectoreducativo@correo.uam.mx
Page 57